Gremlins in 11.0 - Suse

This is a discussion on Gremlins in 11.0 - Suse ; This morning, I attempted my usual bootup in openSUSE 11.0, and it got as far as the green screen with the horizontal progress bar. The bar went about a quarter of the way and then it froze. I did a ...

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Thread: Gremlins in 11.0

  1. Gremlins in 11.0

    This morning, I attempted my usual bootup in openSUSE 11.0, and it got
    as far as the green screen with the horizontal progress bar. The bar
    went about a quarter of the way and then it froze. I did a hot
    re-boot and tried again. Same result. Then, I inserted the openSUSE
    11.0 DVD and attempted to do a repair. Same result, even when
    operating from the DVD!

    What was left to try? For want of a better inspiration, I put it in
    memory test from the DVD and let it cook for an hour and a half while
    I prepared breakfast. After that, I did another hot re-boot and
    decided to try Fail-safe. This worked and put me into what looked
    like the normal desktop. To see what would happen if I switched it
    off and tried again, I did so and then went into the normal KDE 3.5

    Everything is back to normal, but I have no idea what was wrong or
    really how I got everything back right. ;-)

    Puzzled,

    Godzilla

  2. Re: Gremlins in 11.0

    Godzilla wrote:

    > This morning, I attempted my usual bootup in openSUSE 11.0, and it got
    > as far as the green screen with the horizontal progress bar. The bar
    > went about a quarter of the way and then it froze. I did a hot
    > re-boot and tried again. Same result. Then, I inserted the openSUSE
    > 11.0 DVD and attempted to do a repair. Same result, even when
    > operating from the DVD!
    >
    > What was left to try? For want of a better inspiration, I put it in
    > memory test from the DVD and let it cook for an hour and a half while
    > I prepared breakfast. After that, I did another hot re-boot and
    > decided to try Fail-safe. This worked and put me into what looked
    > like the normal desktop. To see what would happen if I switched it
    > off and tried again, I did so and then went into the normal KDE 3.5
    >
    > Everything is back to normal, but I have no idea what was wrong or
    > really how I got everything back right. ;-)
    >
    > Puzzled,
    >
    > Godzilla


    Assuming you did not do this: Press the ESC key while the green loading
    screen in on.

    You may have the drives being scanned, it does it automatically (during
    boot) if scan has not run in more than 62 days, and it can take some time
    with large or multiple partitions - 260G or larger drives amay require an
    extra 5 minutes or more.

    Aorry, I don't remember the correct spelling of the disk scan utility.

    John

  3. Re: Gremlins in 11.0

    On Sat, 30 Aug 2008 07:47:22 -0700, John Bowling wrote:
    > Aorry, I don't remember the correct spelling of the disk scan utility.


    fsck

    Usually the frequency for forcing fsck to check a cleanly umounted file
    system is related to the size of the filesytem.

    You can alter this frequency with tune2fs, assuming an ext{2,3} file
    system.

    QUOTE
    -c max-mount-counts
    Adjust the number of mounts after which the
    filesystem will be checked by e2fsck(8).
    If max-mount-counts is 0 or -1, the number
    of times the filesystem is mounted will be
    disregarded by e2fsck(8) and the kernel.
    Staggering the mount-counts at which filesystems
    are forcibly checked will avoid all
    filesystems being checked at one time
    when using journaled filesystems.

    UNQUOTE

    If something is causing a problem during the boot up sequence, assuming
    the bootlog process is turned on, you can have a look at the file in

    /var/log/boot.msg

  4. Re: Gremlins in 11.0

    J G Miller wrote:

    > On Sat, 30 Aug 2008 07:47:22 -0700, John Bowling wrote:
    >> Aorry, I don't remember the correct spelling of the disk scan
    >> utility.

    >
    > fsck
    >
    > Usually the frequency for forcing fsck to check a cleanly umounted
    > file system is related to the size of the filesytem.
    >
    > You can alter this frequency with tune2fs, assuming an ext{2,3} file
    > system.
    >
    > QUOTE
    > -c max-mount-counts
    > Adjust the number of mounts after which the
    > filesystem will be checked by e2fsck(8).
    > If max-mount-counts is 0 or -1, the number
    > of times the filesystem is mounted will be
    > disregarded by e2fsck(8) and the kernel.
    > Staggering the mount-counts at which filesystems
    > are forcibly checked will avoid all
    > filesystems being checked at one time
    > when using journaled filesystems.
    >
    > UNQUOTE
    >
    > If something is causing a problem during the boot up sequence,
    > assuming the bootlog process is turned on, you can have a look at
    > the file in
    >
    > /var/log/boot.msg


    That was a productive idea. I found this entry in boot.msg:
    fsck 1.40.8 (13-Mar-2008)

    I would interpret that to mean that the last time that fsck was done
    was 13-Mar-2008, unless that was the date of the latest edition of
    fsck ???

    Thanks for the clue :-)

    Godzilla


  5. Re: Gremlins in 11.0

    On Sat, 30 Aug 2008 12:18:07 -0500, Godzilla wrote:

    > I found this entry in boot.msg:
    > fsck 1.40.8 (13-Mar-2008)
    > I would interpret that to mean that the last time that fsck was done was
    > 13-Mar-2008, unless that was the date of the latest edition of fsck ???


    That is the version number and version date of the executable, indicating
    you have an up to date version.

    The question is, what does it say after that line?

    Incidentally, what you can always do to manually check your file systems,
    is to boot from the openSUSE CD/DVD and go into *rescue* mode, without
    any of your filesystems being mounted.

    Then run fsck against the ext{2,3} file systems on your hard disks

    fsck -C -f /dev/{h,s}da{5,6,7}

    using the appropriate hda{partion_number} or sda{partition_number}
    of the ext{2,3} file system obtained from

    fdisk -l

    The -C produces a nice bar chart to watch the progress.
    The -f is to force the checking even though the filesystem has been
    cleanly unmounted.

    The critical aspect of all of this is that fsck must never be run
    on a mounted read-write filesystem or the filesystem in all probability
    will become corrupted and then impossible to recover.

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