OpenSUSE 11.0: Is installing with RAID and LVM possible? - Suse

This is a discussion on OpenSUSE 11.0: Is installing with RAID and LVM possible? - Suse ; Has anybody managed to use the OpenSUSE 11.0 installation DVD to install and then boot using LVM and RAID? I have managed to get myself really confused and thought I would ask before trying different variations of the installation. I ...

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Thread: OpenSUSE 11.0: Is installing with RAID and LVM possible?

  1. OpenSUSE 11.0: Is installing with RAID and LVM possible?

    Has anybody managed to use the OpenSUSE 11.0 installation DVD to install and
    then boot using LVM and RAID?

    I have managed to get myself really confused and thought I would ask before
    trying different variations of the installation.

    I get to the disk partitioning screen and I select 'LVM Based' as the
    partitioning type. This displays:

    Create boot partition /dev/sda1 70.5 MB with ext3
    Create partition /dev/sda2 (465.5GB) with id=8E
    Create volume group system from /dev/sda2
    Create logical volume /dev/system/home (25 GB) for /home with ext3
    Create logical volume /dev/system/root (20 GB) for / with ext3
    Create swap logical volume /dev/system/swap (2 GB)

    I then select 'Edit Partition Setup...' and this is displayed:

    /dev/mapper/isw_dcghefacg_RAID Volume 1 465.7 GB BIOS RAID isw_...
    /dev/sda 465.7 GB SAMSUNG-HD502IJ
    /dev/sda1 70.5 MB F Linux native (Ext3) /boot
    /dev/sda2 456.6 GB Linux LVM
    /dev/sdb 465.7 GB SAMSUNG-HD502IJ
    /dev/system 465.6 GB LVM2 system
    /dev/system/home 25.0 GB F LV /home
    /dev/system/root 20.0 GB F LV /
    /dev/system/swap 2.0 GB F LV /swap

    If I then select 'RAID... -> Create RAID' I am presented with ...

    To use RAID, at least 2 partitions of type 0xFD (or 0x83) are required.
    Change your partition table accordingly. In most cases, this can be done
    in the following way: click 'Create', select 'Do not format', and set the
    File System ID to 0xFD.

    And at this point I realise I am out of my depth.

    If anybody could point me in the right direction I would be grateful. I will
    endeavour to keep notes and post how I get it working.

    Thanks in advance, Stanley


  2. Re: OpenSUSE 11.0: Is installing with RAID and LVM possible?

    On Fri, 25 Jul 2008 16:11:00 +0100, Stanley typed this message:

    > Has anybody managed to use the OpenSUSE 11.0 installation DVD to install
    > and then boot using LVM and RAID?
    >
    > I have managed to get myself really confused and thought I would ask
    > before trying different variations of the installation.
    >
    > I get to the disk partitioning screen and I select 'LVM Based' as the
    > partitioning type. This displays:
    >
    > Create boot partition /dev/sda1 70.5 MB with ext3 Create
    > partition /dev/sda2 (465.5GB) with id=8E Create volume group
    > system from /dev/sda2 Create logical volume /dev/system/home (25
    > GB) for /home with ext3 Create logical volume /dev/system/root
    > (20 GB) for / with ext3 Create swap logical volume
    > /dev/system/swap (2 GB)
    >
    > I then select 'Edit Partition Setup...' and this is displayed:
    >
    > /dev/mapper/isw_dcghefacg_RAID Volume 1 465.7 GB BIOS RAID isw_...
    > /dev/sda 465.7 GB SAMSUNG-HD502IJ
    > /dev/sda1 70.5 MB F Linux native (Ext3)
    > /boot /dev/sda2 456.6 GB Linux LVM
    > /dev/sdb 465.7 GB SAMSUNG-HD502IJ
    > /dev/system 465.6 GB LVM2 system
    > /dev/system/home 25.0 GB F LV /home
    > /dev/system/root 20.0 GB F LV /
    > /dev/system/swap 2.0 GB F LV /swap
    >
    > If I then select 'RAID... -> Create RAID' I am presented with ...
    >
    > To use RAID, at least 2 partitions of type 0xFD (or 0x83) are
    > required. Change your partition table accordingly. In most cases,
    > this can be done in the following way: click 'Create', select 'Do not
    > format', and set the File System ID to 0xFD.
    >
    > And at this point I realise I am out of my depth.
    >
    > If anybody could point me in the right direction I would be grateful. I
    > will endeavour to keep notes and post how I get it working.
    >
    > Thanks in advance, Stanley


    Don't select LVM and don't select RAID.

    Use custom or Edit Partition Setup if you want to keep existing
    partitions or partition the drive yourself.

    If you're keeping an existing partition setup, you must assign /, and
    label the existing partitions and decide which should not be formatted.

  3. Re: OpenSUSE 11.0: Is installing with RAID and LVM possible?

    Stanley a écrit :
    > Has anybody managed to use the OpenSUSE 11.0 installation DVD to install and
    > then boot using LVM and RAID?
    >
    > I have managed to get myself really confused and thought I would ask before
    > trying different variations of the installation.
    >
    > I get to the disk partitioning screen and I select 'LVM Based' as the
    > partitioning type. This displays:
    >
    > Create boot partition /dev/sda1 70.5 MB with ext3
    > Create partition /dev/sda2 (465.5GB) with id=8E
    > Create volume group system from /dev/sda2
    > Create logical volume /dev/system/home (25 GB) for /home with ext3
    > Create logical volume /dev/system/root (20 GB) for / with ext3
    > Create swap logical volume /dev/system/swap (2 GB)
    >
    > I then select 'Edit Partition Setup...' and this is displayed:
    >
    > /dev/mapper/isw_dcghefacg_RAID Volume 1 465.7 GB BIOS RAID isw_...
    > /dev/sda 465.7 GB SAMSUNG-HD502IJ
    > /dev/sda1 70.5 MB F Linux native (Ext3) /boot
    > /dev/sda2 456.6 GB Linux LVM
    > /dev/sdb 465.7 GB SAMSUNG-HD502IJ
    > /dev/system 465.6 GB LVM2 system
    > /dev/system/home 25.0 GB F LV /home
    > /dev/system/root 20.0 GB F LV /
    > /dev/system/swap 2.0 GB F LV /swap
    >
    > If I then select 'RAID... -> Create RAID' I am presented with ...
    >
    > To use RAID, at least 2 partitions of type 0xFD (or 0x83) are required.
    > Change your partition table accordingly. In most cases, this can be done
    > in the following way: click 'Create', select 'Do not format', and set the
    > File System ID to 0xFD.
    >
    > And at this point I realise I am out of my depth.
    >
    > If anybody could point me in the right direction I would be grateful. I will
    > endeavour to keep notes and post how I get it working.
    >
    > Thanks in advance, Stanley
    >


    I've done something which partially looks like what you're talking
    about, but:

    1) I've never used bios raid which is generally "fake raid"; my advice
    is not to use this feature (bios raid), but instead use linux software raid;

    2) I've never stored "/" partition on an LVM+Software Raid, but only on
    a normal Software Raid.

    3) idem for swap partition, and /boot partition

    4) other partitions are on LVM+Software Raid partitions

    having said that, here is the operating mode:

    1) disable raid feature in bios
    2) partition your disks with:
    2a) create a "FD" partition on sda for (usually 100M : sda1)
    2b) create a "FD" partition on sdb for (usually 100M: sdb1)
    2c) create a raid 1 array (md0) for sda1 and sdb1 on /boot and ask for
    formatting with the file system adapted to your needs (ext3 or reiser)

    2d) repeat steps 2a to 2c for a swap partition; you should have sda2 and
    sdb2 mapped to a "md1" raid 1 array (with format = swap)

    2e) repeat steps 2a to 2c for the "/" partition; you should have sda3
    and sdb3 mapped to a "md2" raid 1 array

    2f) create an extended partition with the size adapted to your needs
    (sda4 AND sdb4); do not mirror (MD) them;

    2g) create a logical partition sda5 and sdb5 on each disk, each of the
    same size; choose NO format and FD type for each partition; mirror them
    (raid 1 array); you should have now an "md3" raid partition NOT formatted

    2h) now comes the lvm; chose the lvm menu; create a lvm volume using the
    MD3 partition; now you have a LVM partition using a software raid1 array.

    then allocate the data partitions inside you LVM volume (they are
    automatically mirrored, as the volume itself is mirrored)


    I don't pretend this is the best way to do things;
    This is the way I've chosen, and I'm very satisfied with it.


    BTW, in your grub menu, remove "resume=/dev/sda2" or "resume=/dev/md1"
    because you can't resume from a software mirrored swap partition (at
    least in 10.2)

    HTH
    fabrice


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