openSUSE as a router, how to? - Suse

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Thread: openSUSE as a router, how to?

  1. openSUSE as a router, how to?

    I upgraded my ADSL line to ADSL2+ (24/1)

    I was then downloading a bunch of torrents, all versions of openSUSE 11.0.
    The new speed is just great after coming from a 1/1 connection

    It was great for a short while but then the trobles began.

    I've found out that this kind of heavy high speed traffic is too
    much for the ADSL modem to handle if it does NAT:ing.
    It can't cope with it and crashes.

    So I've changed it to bridge and now it works great.
    Obviously I need the NAT:ing to take place on the server.

    I just have not configured a router before so...

    I put in a second network card and configured it to the LAN.
    The LAN is as it was before and it works fine. As does the Internet on
    the server.

    But the routing is somehow wrong.

    The current results of netstat -r:

    Kernel IP routing table (This is my server)
    Destination Gateway Genmask Flags MSS Window irtt
    Iface
    192.168.1.0 * 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0
    eth1
    a88-112-0-0.eli * 255.255.224.0 U 0 0 0
    eth0
    loopback * 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0
    eth1
    link-local * 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0
    eth0
    loopback * 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0
    lo
    default a88-112-0-1.eli 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0
    eth0


    And another box:

    Kernel IP routing table (This is another box)
    Destination Gateway Genmask Flags MSS Window irtt
    Iface
    192.168.1.0 * 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0
    eth0
    88.112.0.0 * 255.255.224.0 U 0 0 0
    eth0
    link-local * 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0
    eth0
    loopback * 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0
    lo

    AS for LAN, fine. but no Internet connection.

    I wonder if I'll see any hands rising...

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  2. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to?

    Vahis wrote:
    > So I've changed it to bridge and now it works great.
    > Obviously I need the NAT:ing to take place on the server.
    >
    > I just have not configured a router before so...


    Last time I did this is a while ago. I think I just clicked 'masquerade'
    in the openSUSE router and enterd the gateway of that in the other
    machine.

    All done using YaST somewhere in the network settings.

    houghi
    --
    Theologians can pursuade themselves of anything. Anyone who can worship
    a trinity and insists that his religion is a monotheism can believe
    anything -- just give him time to rationalize it.
    Robert A. Heinlein, JOB: A Comedy of Justice

  3. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-24, Vahis wrote:
    > I upgraded my ADSL line to ADSL2+ (24/1)
    >
    > I was then downloading a bunch of torrents, all versions of openSUSE 11.0.
    > The new speed is just great after coming from a 1/1 connection
    >
    > It was great for a short while but then the trobles began.
    >
    > I've found out that this kind of heavy high speed traffic is too
    > much for the ADSL modem to handle if it does NAT:ing.
    > It can't cope with it and crashes.
    >
    > So I've changed it to bridge and now it works great.
    > Obviously I need the NAT:ing to take place on the server.
    >
    > I just have not configured a router before so...
    >
    > I put in a second network card and configured it to the LAN.
    > The LAN is as it was before and it works fine. As does the Internet on
    > the server.
    >
    > But the routing is somehow wrong.
    >
    > The current results of netstat -r:
    >
    > Kernel IP routing table (This is my server)
    > Destination Gateway Genmask Flags MSS Window irtt
    > Iface
    > 192.168.1.0 * 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth1
    > a88-112-0-0.eli * 255.255.224.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth0
    > loopback * 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth1
    > link-local * 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth0
    > loopback * 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0
    > lo
    > default a88-112-0-1.eli 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0
    > eth0
    >
    >
    > And another box:
    >
    > Kernel IP routing table (This is another box)
    > Destination Gateway Genmask Flags MSS Window irtt
    > Iface
    > 192.168.1.0 * 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth0
    > 88.112.0.0 * 255.255.224.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth0
    > link-local * 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0
    > eth0
    > loopback * 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0
    > lo
    >
    > AS for LAN, fine. but no Internet connection.
    >
    > I wonder if I'll see any hands rising...


    I found it:
    The computers in the LAN accessing the Internet via this router did not
    have the DNS servers configured.

    I added the ones from my ISP and now everything works

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  4. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to?

    Vahis wrote:

    > I upgraded my ADSL line to ADSL2+ (24/1)
    >
    > I was then downloading a bunch of torrents, all versions of openSUSE
    > 11.0. The new speed is just great after coming from a 1/1 connection
    >
    >
    > It was great for a short while but then the trobles began.
    >
    > I've found out that this kind of heavy high speed traffic is too
    > much for the ADSL modem to handle if it does NAT:ing.
    > It can't cope with it and crashes.


    ADSL 1 modems will struggle on ADSL2+ connections ! I replaced mine
    because of that. It was easier than messing about. The original modem
    is doing sterling service on another system.

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.

  5. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to?

    On 2008-06-24, Baron wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >
    >> I upgraded my ADSL line to ADSL2+ (24/1)
    >>
    >> I was then downloading a bunch of torrents, all versions of openSUSE
    >> 11.0. The new speed is just great after coming from a 1/1 connection
    >>
    >>
    >> It was great for a short while but then the trobles began.
    >>
    >> I've found out that this kind of heavy high speed traffic is too
    >> much for the ADSL modem to handle if it does NAT:ing.
    >> It can't cope with it and crashes.

    >
    > ADSL 1 modems will struggle on ADSL2+ connections ! I replaced mine
    > because of that. It was easier than messing about. The original modem
    > is doing sterling service on another system.
    >


    This is is an ADSL2+ modem.

    System Name:
    ZyNOS F/W Version: V3.40(PE.11) | 05/22/2006
    DSL FW Version:TI AR7 05.01.03.00
    Standard:ADSL2+

    But further experience has shown that the problems haven't disappeared
    after all.

    Now it's been bridging and openSUSE has been routing.

    I have now tested this with two different ADSL modems.
    The one that is included in my new ADSL2+ package is in the mail.
    So I'll be testing a new modem soon.

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  6. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    Vahis wrote:
    >> I wonder if I'll see any hands rising...

    >
    > I found it:
    > The computers in the LAN accessing the Internet via this router did not
    > have the DNS servers configured.
    >
    > I added the ones from my ISP and now everything works


    Mmm, strange. Normaly that should be done automaticaly with DHCP.

    houghi
    --
    The whole principle [of censorship] is wrong. It's like demanding that
    grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't have steak.
    -- Robert A. Heinlein in "The Man Who Sold the Moon"

  7. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-25, houghi wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >>> I wonder if I'll see any hands rising...

    >>
    >> I found it:
    >> The computers in the LAN accessing the Internet via this router did not
    >> have the DNS servers configured.
    >>
    >> I added the ones from my ISP and now everything works

    >
    > Mmm, strange. Normaly that should be done automaticaly with DHCP.
    >

    The machines in the LAN do not use DHCP server. The whole LAN is
    192.168.x.x fixed IP:s.

    The server gets its external address from ISP though.

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  8. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    Vahis wrote:
    > The machines in the LAN do not use DHCP server. The whole LAN is
    > 192.168.x.x fixed IP:s.


    Even stranger. I have configured my DHCP server (which is also my modem
    and router and firewall and coffeemaker) that it gives the same IP to
    the same machine all the time. That server also has the DNS IP adresses
    and passes them on to the machines.

    They are in the 192.168.1.x range. All 4 of therm (including the router)

    Then I have put the same hosts file on each machine:
    127.0.0.1 localhost news test php
    192.168.1.200 penne.houghi penne
    192.168.1.254 router
    192.168.1.201 pizza
    192.168.1.202 pasta


    localhost is obvious, news is for Usenet test is for testpage on Apache
    and php is for phpMyAdmin

    houghi
    --
    The whole principle [of censorship] is wrong. It's like demanding that
    grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't have steak.
    -- Robert A. Heinlein in "The Man Who Sold the Moon"

  9. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On Wed, 25 Jun 2008 13:22:00 +0200, houghi wrote:

    > Vahis wrote:
    >> The machines in the LAN do not use DHCP server. The whole LAN is
    >> 192.168.x.x fixed IP:s.

    >
    > Even stranger. I have configured my DHCP server (which is also my modem
    > and router and firewall and coffeemaker) that it gives the same IP to
    > the same machine all the time. That server also has the DNS IP adresses
    > and passes them on to the machines.
    >



    you probably never turn anything off for long enough for the lease to
    expire

  10. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-25, houghi wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >> The machines in the LAN do not use DHCP server. The whole LAN is
    >> 192.168.x.x fixed IP:s.

    >
    > Even stranger.


    I don't see anything strange there.

    > I have configured my DHCP server (which is also my modem
    > and router and firewall and coffeemaker) that it gives the same IP to
    > the same machine all the time. That server also has the DNS IP adresses
    > and passes them on to the machines.


    That's how I had mine while the ADSL modem did everything.
    >
    > They are in the 192.168.1.x range. All 4 of therm (including the router)
    >
    > Then I have put the same hosts file on each machine:
    > 127.0.0.1 localhost news test php
    > 192.168.1.200 penne.houghi penne
    > 192.168.1.254 router
    > 192.168.1.201 pizza
    > 192.168.1.202 pasta
    >
    >

    My LAN is very similar.

    But now I have the ADSL modem bridging and my server has a new external NIC.
    The LAN is like it used to be.

    A nice new feature came along with this new configuration:
    I can now browse my web server also by pointing to its external address.
    Being on any machine, even the server itself

    I also now have real-time Full HD stream of all free DVB-T channels and
    I can record them on my ISP's server, I have 5 TB disk space there.

    Plus video-on-demand rental of movies.

    I had to buy a new screen, 1920x1200 with speakers though, € 299.

    The next thing is to put a DHCP server running.
    I'll make a new server with 11.0 for all this soon

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  11. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    Vahis wrote:
    > On 2008-06-25, houghi wrote:
    >> Vahis wrote:
    >>> The machines in the LAN do not use DHCP server. The whole LAN is
    >>> 192.168.x.x fixed IP:s.

    >>
    >> Even stranger.

    >
    > I don't see anything strange there.


    Fixed IP? Strange!

    > That's how I had mine while the ADSL modem did everything.


    openSUSE can do that for you as well.

    > But now I have the ADSL modem bridging and my server has a new external NIC.
    > The LAN is like it used to be.


    It now misses a DHCP server which you could install with YaST and
    probably configure it there as well.

    > A nice new feature came along with this new configuration:
    > I can now browse my web server also by pointing to its external address.
    > Being on any machine, even the server itself


    Why would that be different from before?

    > I also now have real-time Full HD stream of all free DVB-T channels and
    > I can record them on my ISP's server, I have 5 TB disk space there.


    I am so jealous.

    > Plus video-on-demand rental of movies.


    Not so much. Just use torrents. ;-)

    > I had to buy a new screen, 1920x1200 with speakers though, ? 299.


    Pfft. I have two, yet two, 1920x1200 and also a 1600x1200 for wich I do
    not have a connection at this moment.
    I am looking into buying a new PC where I can connect 3 screens. Will
    proably be a quadcore with 8GB in memory an 2 1TB HD's

    > The next thing is to put a DHCP server running.


    Ah, now we are talking. ;-)

    > I'll make a new server with 11.0 for all this soon


    Neat. Are you going extremely small (like 486 with almost nothing, just
    2 network cards and a small HD) or extremely large and fast?

    houghi
    --
    The whole principle [of censorship] is wrong. It's like demanding that
    grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't have steak.
    -- Robert A. Heinlein in "The Man Who Sold the Moon"

  12. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-25, houghi wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >> On 2008-06-25, houghi wrote:
    >>> Vahis wrote:
    >>>> The machines in the LAN do not use DHCP server. The whole LAN is
    >>>> 192.168.x.x fixed IP:s.
    >>>
    >>> Even stranger.

    >>
    >> I don't see anything strange there.

    >
    > Fixed IP? Strange!


    What's so strange about fixed addresses in a LAN?
    >
    >> That's how I had mine while the ADSL modem did everything.

    >
    > openSUSE can do that for you as well.


    I know.

    >
    >> But now I have the ADSL modem bridging and my server has a new external NIC.
    >> The LAN is like it used to be.

    >
    > It now misses a DHCP server which you could install with YaST and
    > probably configure it there as well.


    I will. YaST can do it.

    >
    >> A nice new feature came along with this new configuration:
    >> I can now browse my web server also by pointing to its external address.
    >> Being on any machine, even the server itself

    >
    > Why would that be different from before?


    I don't know. It just didn't work before. But I never gave it another
    thought.

    >
    >> I also now have real-time Full HD stream of all free DVB-T channels and
    >> I can record them on my ISP's server, I have 5 TB disk space there.

    >
    > I am so jealous.


    The price is not that bad either, € 38/month:

    DVB-T box
    Full Rate ADSL2+ modem

    4 Mbs down 1 Mbs up
    Another 50GB disk space (I now have 50)
    5 TB for the recorded TV programs

    I'd like to have more upstream but that's not possible.
    Not as a home line that is. That's a big setback

    I haven't received the HW yet though.

    >
    >> Plus video-on-demand rental of movies.

    >
    > Not so much. Just use torrents. ;-)


    They download real fast now, too.
    >
    >> I had to buy a new screen, 1920x1200 with speakers though, ? 299.

    >
    > Pfft. I have two, yet two, 1920x1200 and also a 1600x1200 for wich I do
    > not have a connection at this moment.
    > I am looking into buying a new PC where I can connect 3 screens. Will
    > proably be a quadcore with 8GB in memory an 2 1TB HD's


    I'm looking for something similar. Less screens, though.
    I just wonder about all the different HW available.

    Which proc, which mobo, which psu, which case etc.

    >
    >> The next thing is to put a DHCP server running.

    >
    > Ah, now we are talking. ;-)


    I don't need it much, though.

    >
    >> I'll make a new server with 11.0 for all this soon

    >
    > Neat. Are you going extremely small (like 486 with almost nothing, just
    > 2 network cards and a small HD) or extremely large and fast?


    The latter.
    A machine that runs virtual machines fast and in numbers

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  13. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to?

    Vahis wrote:

    > On 2008-06-24, Baron wrote:
    >> Vahis wrote:
    >>
    >>> I upgraded my ADSL line to ADSL2+ (24/1)
    >>>
    >>> I was then downloading a bunch of torrents, all versions of openSUSE
    >>> 11.0. The new speed is just great after coming from a 1/1 connection
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> It was great for a short while but then the trobles began.
    >>>
    >>> I've found out that this kind of heavy high speed traffic is too
    >>> much for the ADSL modem to handle if it does NAT:ing.
    >>> It can't cope with it and crashes.

    >>
    >> ADSL 1 modems will struggle on ADSL2+ connections ! I replaced mine
    >> because of that. It was easier than messing about. The original
    >> modem is doing sterling service on another system.
    >>

    >
    > This is is an ADSL2+ modem.
    >
    > System Name:
    > ZyNOS F/W Version: V3.40(PE.11) | 05/22/2006
    > DSL FW Version:TI AR7 05.01.03.00
    > Standard:ADSL2+


    Its a make/name/brand I've never heard of. However the bit that
    says "Version:T1" suggests that its early ! Maybe there is a firmware
    update for it ?

    > But further experience has shown that the problems haven't disappeared
    > after all.


    See above !

    > Now it's been bridging and openSUSE has been routing.
    >
    > I have now tested this with two different ADSL modems.
    > The one that is included in my new ADSL2+ package is in the mail.
    > So I'll be testing a new modem soon.
    >
    > Vahis


    Could be that the one supplied by your ISP has modified firmware !
    There are a number of UK ISP's do that trick. It nicely prevents you
    from using it with another ISP. BT are notorious for it.

    A chap I know moved from BT and found that he couldn't make his modem
    work with the new provider. So he found out what the retail version
    was, downloaded the firmware, then flashed the modem to make it work
    for him. Just afterwards he then dumped it because his new ISP sent
    him a nice wireless one.

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.

  14. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    Vahis wrote:
    >>> I don't see anything strange there.

    >>
    >> Fixed IP? Strange!

    >
    > What's so strange about fixed addresses in a LAN?


    In this day and age of DHCP it is just odd that one would still use it.

    > I'm looking for something similar. Less screens, though.
    > I just wonder about all the different HW available.
    >
    > Which proc, which mobo, which psu, which case etc.


    And what belongs to what. I use something like
    http://www.alternate.nl/html/builder...eeName=Builder Sorry,
    it is in Dutch. What it doers is look what you have selected and then
    not present something for the next choice.

    So first click on Processor and select e.g. the AMD Phenom\u2122 X4 Quad
    9850. To add it to the configuration, click on the 'wheel'.
    You will then get back to 'Vereiste Componenten' and click on
    'Moederbord'. Select one and add it. Next select memory and so on.

    If somebody has an English site that does this, I would love to hear
    about it as it comes in very handy. You can then still buy it wherever
    you want, but at least you know what goes together with what.

    >> Neat. Are you going extremely small (like 486 with almost nothing, just
    >> 2 network cards and a small HD) or extremely large and fast?

    >
    > The latter.
    > A machine that runs virtual machines fast and in numbers


    Then I would go for the quadcode with 8GB in memory. Main thing is that
    the motherboard supports 8GB. I would then also look for a second
    screen. That way you can have an OS on each screen.

    houghi
    --
    The whole principle [of censorship] is wrong. It's like demanding that
    grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't have steak.
    -- Robert A. Heinlein in "The Man Who Sold the Moon"

  15. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to?

    On 2008-06-25, Baron wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >
    >> On 2008-06-24, Baron wrote:
    >>> Vahis wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I upgraded my ADSL line to ADSL2+ (24/1)
    >>>>
    >>>> I was then downloading a bunch of torrents, all versions of openSUSE
    >>>> 11.0. The new speed is just great after coming from a 1/1 connection
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> It was great for a short while but then the trobles began.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've found out that this kind of heavy high speed traffic is too
    >>>> much for the ADSL modem to handle if it does NAT:ing.
    >>>> It can't cope with it and crashes.
    >>>
    >>> ADSL 1 modems will struggle on ADSL2+ connections ! I replaced mine
    >>> because of that. It was easier than messing about. The original
    >>> modem is doing sterling service on another system.
    >>>

    >>
    >> This is is an ADSL2+ modem.
    >>
    >> System Name:
    >> ZyNOS F/W Version: V3.40(PE.11) | 05/22/2006
    >> DSL FW Version:TI AR7 05.01.03.00
    >> Standard:ADSL2+

    >
    > Its a make/name/brand I've never heard of. However the bit that
    > says "Version:T1" suggests that its early ! Maybe there is a firmware
    > update for it ?


    Zyxel. Latest but not very new FW.
    >
    >> But further experience has shown that the problems haven't disappeared
    >> after all.

    >
    > See above !
    >
    >> Now it's been bridging and openSUSE has been routing.
    >>
    >> I have now tested this with two different ADSL modems.
    >> The one that is included in my new ADSL2+ package is in the mail.
    >> So I'll be testing a new modem soon.
    >>
    >> Vahis

    >
    > Could be that the one supplied by your ISP has modified firmware !
    > There are a number of UK ISP's do that trick. It nicely prevents you
    > from using it with another ISP. BT are notorious for it.


    Also this Zyxel is originallt from them.
    >
    > A chap I know moved from BT and found that he couldn't make his modem
    > work with the new provider. So he found out what the retail version
    > was, downloaded the firmware, then flashed the modem to make it work
    > for him. Just afterwards he then dumped it because his new ISP sent
    > him a nice wireless one.
    >


    Even moving from one DSLAM to another has influence.
    Or staying in the same place while a neighbor subscribes for a line or
    changes something or...

    My distance to the DSLAM is over 3 km. That's pretty critical.
    Fast connections in old telephone copper lines is something where you
    also need a bit of luck.


    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  16. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-25, houghi wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >>>> I don't see anything strange there.
    >>>
    >>> Fixed IP? Strange!

    >>
    >> What's so strange about fixed addresses in a LAN?

    >
    > In this day and age of DHCP it is just odd that one would still use it.


    I am. What's the setback?

    >
    >> I'm looking for something similar. Less screens, though.
    >> I just wonder about all the different HW available.
    >>
    >> Which proc, which mobo, which psu, which case etc.

    >
    > And what belongs to what. I use something like
    > http://www.alternate.nl/html/builder...eeName=Builder Sorry,
    > it is in Dutch. What it doers is look what you have selected and then
    > not present something for the next choice.
    >
    > So first click on Processor and select e.g. the AMD Phenom\u2122 X4 Quad
    > 9850. To add it to the configuration, click on the 'wheel'.
    > You will then get back to 'Vereiste Componenten' and click on
    > 'Moederbord'. Select one and add it. Next select memory and so on.


    That's a good page. I'll start to see what it suggests.

    > If somebody has an English site that does this, I would love to hear
    > about it as it comes in very handy. You can then still buy it wherever
    > you want, but at least you know what goes together with what.


    I would like that, too. It looks very useful.
    >
    >>> Neat. Are you going extremely small (like 486 with almost nothing, just
    >>> 2 network cards and a small HD) or extremely large and fast?

    >>
    >> The latter.
    >> A machine that runs virtual machines fast and in numbers

    >
    > Then I would go for the quadcode with 8GB in memory. Main thing is that
    > the motherboard supports 8GB. I would then also look for a second
    > screen. That way you can have an OS on each screen.


    We'll see. There's always a problem with the dough, too.
    And I'd like a silent one, so case, psu and cooling will cost extra

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  17. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    Vahis wrote:
    >> In this day and age of DHCP it is just odd that one would still use it.

    >
    > I am. What's the setback?


    That you forget things, like entereing the DNS servers.

    > We'll see. There's always a problem with the dough, too.
    > And I'd like a silent one, so case, psu and cooling will cost extra


    Watercooling. I have made a machine once based on a quad core and the
    price was just above 1.000EUR
    This was without watercooling, but with the ability to connect 3
    screens, 2TB HD and 8GB of memory. Also a new tower and power.

    Some things that I got from a friend. When you realy start to buy, ask
    people who realy know (e.g. in a hardware group for the specifications
    and in a Linux group to see if it will work)
    Memory: Faster is better, as long as your mobo supports it, but also
    look at the specifications with the CAS-latency. (e.g. 4-4-4 is faster
    then 10-4-4)

    The most difficult part is selecting a motherboard, I think. What do you
    need and what don't you need.

    Oh and there is also http://www.alternate.eu in English. You can then
    still compare products. Unfortunatly no PC builder. :-(

    houghi
    --
    But I will accept the rules that you feel necessary to your freedom. I am
    free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I
    tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free
    because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  18. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On Thu, 26 Jun 2008, Vahis wrote:-

    >On 2008-06-25, houghi wrote:
    >> Vahis wrote:


    >>> What's so strange about fixed addresses in a LAN?

    >>
    >> In this day and age of DHCP it is just odd that one would still use it.

    >
    >I am. What's the setback?


    As Houghi said, setting up a static address means you need to remember
    to set up everything about it. This includes routeing, DNS servers, etc.
    and it's possible to miss out some things.

    On the other hand, once the DHCP server has all the options set, it's
    basically a case of plug and go. And you don't have to let the DHCP
    server give the machines dynamic IPs. You can use a few "host"
    directives to specify fixed addresses.

    My network has a nice mix of systems with static IPs, systems that use
    DHCP and get static IPs, and the few that get a dynamic IP address.
    Those that are statically assigned are the servers, those that get their
    static addresses via DHCP are my other machines. Finally, those that get
    the dynamic IPs are either machines that are guests on my network[0],
    or virtual machines used for testing installations.


    [0] Like where I'm fixing something for someone and can't talk them
    through the process over the phone.

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  19. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    David Bolt wrote:
    > My network has a nice mix of systems with static IPs, systems that use
    > DHCP and get static IPs, and the few that get a dynamic IP address.
    > Those that are statically assigned are the servers, those that get their
    > static addresses via DHCP are my other machines. Finally, those that get
    > the dynamic IPs are either machines that are guests on my network[0],
    > or virtual machines used for testing installations.


    Why the static adresses for the servers? I would also give them dynamic
    adresses. Then when you want to change something, you have a single
    point to change it.

    houghi
    --
    But I will accept the rules that you feel necessary to your freedom. I am
    free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I
    tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free
    because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  20. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-26, David Bolt wrote:
    > On Thu, 26 Jun 2008, Vahis wrote:-
    >
    >>On 2008-06-25, houghi wrote:
    >>> Vahis wrote:

    >
    >>>> What's so strange about fixed addresses in a LAN?
    >>>
    >>> In this day and age of DHCP it is just odd that one would still use it.

    >>
    >>I am. What's the setback?

    >
    > As Houghi said, setting up a static address means you need to remember
    > to set up everything about it. This includes routeing, DNS servers, etc.
    > and it's possible to miss out some things.


    Exactly what happened. In this case it felt just simpler and faster, new
    nic into the server, new gateway for the clients, you're done.
    Except that I forgot the DNS server addresses.

    As soon as I receive the new ADSL router box I should be back to normal.
    I don't know if I'd need my own DHCP server for anything.

    I have thought of trying VPN, maybe then its needed.
    I haven't set up VPN:s ever.

    >
    > On the other hand, once the DHCP server has all the options set, it's
    > basically a case of plug and go. And you don't have to let the DHCP
    > server give the machines dynamic IPs. You can use a few "host"
    > directives to specify fixed addresses.


    You guys seem to want me to set up a DHCP server
    OK. But I haven't got time to rock the boat before Saturday.
    Saturday settled then
    >
    > My network has a nice mix of systems with static IPs, systems that use
    > DHCP and get static IPs, and the few that get a dynamic IP address.
    > Those that are statically assigned are the servers, those that get their
    > static addresses via DHCP are my other machines. Finally, those that get
    > the dynamic IPs are either machines that are guests on my network[0],
    > or virtual machines used for testing installations.


    I have a mixture bit like that. In case you meant static IP:s for the
    servers are external, I wish I had them, too.
    >
    >
    > [0] Like where I'm fixing something for someone and can't talk them
    > through the process over the phone.
    >


    Same here


    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

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