openSUSE as a router, how to? - Suse

This is a discussion on openSUSE as a router, how to? - Suse ; On 2008-06-26, houghi wrote: > David Bolt wrote: >> My network has a nice mix of systems with static IPs, systems that use >> DHCP and get static IPs, and the few that get a dynamic IP address. >> Those ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 33 of 33

Thread: openSUSE as a router, how to?

  1. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-26, houghi wrote:
    > David Bolt wrote:
    >> My network has a nice mix of systems with static IPs, systems that use
    >> DHCP and get static IPs, and the few that get a dynamic IP address.
    >> Those that are statically assigned are the servers, those that get their
    >> static addresses via DHCP are my other machines. Finally, those that get
    >> the dynamic IPs are either machines that are guests on my network[0],
    >> or virtual machines used for testing installations.

    >
    > Why the static adresses for the servers? I would also give them dynamic
    > adresses. Then when you want to change something, you have a single
    > point to change it.
    >


    I thought David meant static external addresses for the servers.

    I'd like that, too.

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  2. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On Thu, 26 Jun 2008, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:
    >> My network has a nice mix of systems with static IPs, systems that use
    >> DHCP and get static IPs, and the few that get a dynamic IP address.
    >> Those that are statically assigned are the servers, those that get their
    >> static addresses via DHCP are my other machines. Finally, those that get
    >> the dynamic IPs are either machines that are guests on my network[0],
    >> or virtual machines used for testing installations.

    >
    >Why the static adresses for the servers?


    They are sat behind a router that's doing port forwarding so any changes
    would need to be made there, on the DHCP server itself, and on each of
    the other machines.

    >I would also give them dynamic
    >adresses.


    Some things don't work too well like that, especially when the various
    functions are split up a bit.

    For example, one of my systems hosts the database server. This is
    separate from the machine running the web server and so, for the scripts
    running on the web server to be able to find it, it needs to be on a
    static IP address. Also, this system is also running a DNS server which
    requires a static IP address so the other systems can find it.

    Another system hosts the machine that acts as a central mail gateway and
    pop3 server, so it needs to have a static address so the other machines
    know where to mails are supposed to end up.

    Then there's the web server. That's accessible from outside my network,
    and the router does port-forwarding to it, so that needs a static IP
    address. The DHCP server is also running on that same system, although
    it doesn't actually need to be on a static IP address. Again, this
    system is also running a DNS server which requires a static IP address
    so the other systems can find it.

    All in all, there are a total of three systems that are actually
    configured with static IP. The rest of them request their IP addresses
    using DHCP, which is configured to give them the same static address.

    >Then when you want to change something, you have a single
    >point to change it.


    Not with the various functions spread out between the various systems.
    To make changes could require changes to single systems, or it may only
    require one change. While I can swap which system if providing the web
    service with a single change of the forwarding rules, the database
    server would need a change of DNS on at least two systems.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  3. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On Thu, 26 Jun 2008, Vahis wrote:-

    >I thought David meant static external addresses for the servers.


    No, I only have a single static address. I did have the choice to have a
    block of 8 but, at the time I upgraded my service, I decided not to
    bother. Thinking back, I may have made a mistake in opting for a single
    address, but I'm not too worried about it. I can probably change again
    at a later date.

    As for now, the various net-facing servers are on static IPs on my
    network and the router just does the necessary port-forwarding to them.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  4. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-26, David Bolt wrote:
    > On Thu, 26 Jun 2008, Vahis wrote:-
    >
    >>I thought David meant static external addresses for the servers.

    >
    > No, I only have a single static address.


    I wish I had one. But OTOH my current price is tolerable

    > I did have the choice to have a
    > block of 8 but, at the time I upgraded my service, I decided not to
    > bother. Thinking back, I may have made a mistake in opting for a single
    > address, but I'm not too worried about it. I can probably change again
    > at a later date.
    >
    > As for now, the various net-facing servers are on static IPs on my
    > network and the router just does the necessary port-forwarding to them.
    >


    That's how my lan is.
    It's just the external IP that needs no-ip service that I hate.

    I'd do fine with one static address. That'd need to be a corporate
    account which I can't/won't pay for...

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  5. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On Thu, 26 Jun 2008, Vahis wrote:-

    >On 2008-06-26, David Bolt wrote:
    >> On Thu, 26 Jun 2008, Vahis wrote:-
    >>
    >>>I thought David meant static external addresses for the servers.

    >>
    >> No, I only have a single static address.

    >
    >I wish I had one. But OTOH my current price is tolerable


    I've had a static IP since I got my first dial-up, over ten years ago,
    and have had one ever since. That doesn't mean I have the same IP
    address as I had at the beginning, as I've had two changes of account
    since then, the first being my first ADSL account, and the second when I
    moved to "business" ADSL a different telephone line.

    >> As for now, the various net-facing servers are on static IPs on my
    >> network and the router just does the necessary port-forwarding to them.
    >>

    >
    >That's how my lan is.
    >It's just the external IP that needs no-ip service that I hate.
    >
    >I'd do fine with one static address.


    That was why I opted for the single IP address. I'd been port-forwarding
    to my various servers for a long while, even before I moved from dial-up
    to ADSL, and so there was less configurations to change by sticking with
    a single IP address.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  6. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    Vahis wrote:
    > As soon as I receive the new ADSL router box I should be back to normal.
    > I don't know if I'd need my own DHCP server for anything.


    Most likely your new modem will have a DHCP server and if not, you can
    still configure one server to be DHCP server for your modem as well.

    > I have thought of trying VPN, maybe then its needed.
    > I haven't set up VPN:s ever.


    No. DHCP is never 'needed'. It is just 'usefull'.

    > You guys seem to want me to set up a DHCP server
    > OK. But I haven't got time to rock the boat before Saturday.
    > Saturday settled then


    Yeah, we will force you to learn. That said, I never have installed a
    DHCP server myself, except for what my modem does.

    houghi
    --
    But I will accept the rules that you feel necessary to your freedom. I am
    free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I
    tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free
    because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  7. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    David Bolt wrote:
    >
    >
    > On Thu, 26 Jun 2008, Vahis wrote:-
    >
    >>I thought David meant static external addresses for the servers.

    >
    > No, I only have a single static address. I did have the choice to have a
    > block of 8 but, at the time I upgraded my service,


    I have seen companies who had 8 and no serious real need for hem, exept
    lazyness. www for one, ftp for the next and mail yet another one. That
    is what you use a router for.

    > I decided not to
    > bother. Thinking back, I may have made a mistake in opting for a single
    > address, but I'm not too worried about it. I can probably change again
    > at a later date.


    What would you be able to do that you can't with a single adress and
    router configuration that you actualy use?

    houghi
    --
    But I will accept the rules that you feel necessary to your freedom. I am
    free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I
    tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free
    because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  8. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    David Bolt wrote:
    > I've had a static IP since I got my first dial-up, over ten years ago,
    > and have had one ever since. That doesn't mean I have the same IP
    > address as I had at the beginning, as I've had two changes of account
    > since then, the first being my first ADSL account, and the second when I
    > moved to "business" ADSL a different telephone line.


    Only recently it became possible to have a fixed IP for no extra charge
    in Belgium. The only reason companies charge extra for a fixed IP is so
    they can charge extra. There is no need for them to do so. Not
    technicaly, not financialy in terms of costs.

    One could even argue that a fixed IP would be cheaper for the provider.

    houghi
    --
    But I will accept the rules that you feel necessary to your freedom. I am
    free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I
    tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free
    because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  9. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    David Bolt wrote:
    >>I would also give them dynamic
    >>adresses.

    >
    > Some things don't work too well like that, especially when the various
    > functions are split up a bit.
    >
    > For example, one of my systems hosts the database server. This is
    > separate from the machine running the web server and so, for the scripts
    > running on the web server to be able to find it, it needs to be on a
    > static IP address. Also, this system is also running a DNS server which
    > requires a static IP address so the other systems can find it.


    It could still get those from a DHCP server.

    > Another system hosts the machine that acts as a central mail gateway and
    > pop3 server, so it needs to have a static address so the other machines
    > know where to mails are supposed to end up.


    Could get it from the DHCP server.

    > Then there's the web server. That's accessible from outside my network,
    > and the router does port-forwarding to it, so that needs a static IP
    > address.


    From the DHCP server as well.

    > The DHCP server is also running on that same system, although
    > it doesn't actually need to be on a static IP address. Again, this
    > system is also running a DNS server which requires a static IP address
    > so the other systems can find it.


    It could get the IP from the DHCP server, although I am not 100% sure
    because it IS the DHCP server.

    > All in all, there are a total of three systems that are actually
    > configured with static IP. The rest of them request their IP addresses
    > using DHCP, which is configured to give them the same static address.


    At least 2 will be able to work with a fixed IP deliverd by the DHCP
    server. Just the DHCP server itself _MIGHT_ be an exeption.

    >>Then when you want to change something, you have a single
    >>point to change it.

    >
    > Not with the various functions spread out between the various systems.


    Yes, it will.

    > To make changes could require changes to single systems, or it may only
    > require one change. While I can swap which system if providing the web
    > service with a single change of the forwarding rules, the database
    > server would need a change of DNS on at least two systems.


    We are talking about what IP adress a machine has. That is all. This has
    nothing to do with what server is running on it or what else you might
    need to change.

    All we are talking about is if a machine is 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.0.2.
    That's it. Next to that you can also force DNS to it and some other
    things.

    Real life situation:

    Your webserver is 192.168.0.1 and called webserv.localdomain as well as
    old-one. Your router forwards traffic to 192.168.0.1 on port 80.

    Now you need to change that server. You place a new machine on
    192.168.0.2 and call it new-one. Once you can go life you do first the
    DHCP. You give the newser server IP 192.168.0.1 via DHCP and the older
    192.168.0.2. The next thing is to change the DNS settings for old-one
    and new-one.

    houghi
    --
    But I will accept the rules that you feel necessary to your freedom. I am
    free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I
    tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free
    because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  10. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-26, houghi wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >> As soon as I receive the new ADSL router box I should be back to normal.
    >> I don't know if I'd need my own DHCP server for anything.

    >
    > Most likely your new modem will have a DHCP server and if not, you can
    > still configure one server to be DHCP server for your modem as well.


    Sure it does. My current one has it, too.
    It's just that the current one doesn't seem to have enough torque to
    take care of routing and and stuff with my current traffic.

    This is only my own deduction and theories though.
    That's how it looks like when it freezes.
    It was fine with 1/1 line, with 24/1 it seems to go tits up.
    If I don't run Vuze at all it copes better.

    >
    >> I have thought of trying VPN, maybe then its needed.
    >> I haven't set up VPN:s ever.

    >
    > No. DHCP is never 'needed'. It is just 'usefull'.
    >
    >> You guys seem to want me to set up a DHCP server
    >> OK. But I haven't got time to rock the boat before Saturday.
    >> Saturday settled then

    >
    > Yeah, we will force you to learn. That said, I never have installed a
    > DHCP server myself, except for what my modem does.


    There doesn't seem to be much in it.
    But that's because of Yet Another Setup Tool

    MHO:
    If a distro doesn't have YaST, don't touch it!


    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  11. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to? Solved!

    On 2008-06-26, Vahis wrote:
    > On 2008-06-26, houghi wrote:
    >> Vahis wrote:

    >
    > MHO:
    > If a distro doesn't have YaST, don't touch it!
    >

    P.S. It should have a button to do this though:

    #!/bin/sh
    sqlite3 /var/cache/zypp/zypp.db vacuum
    rpm --rebuilddb # takes long
    for fn in /var/cache/zypp/zypp.db \
    /var/lib/rpm/Packages \
    /var/lib/rpm/Filemd5s \
    /var/lib/rpm/Dirnames \
    /var/lib/rpm/Basenames
    do
    cp $fn $fn.new || exit 1
    rm $fn
    mv $fn.new $fn
    done

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  12. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to?

    Vahis wrote:

    > On 2008-06-25, Baron wrote:
    >> Vahis wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2008-06-24, Baron wrote:
    >>>> Vahis wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I upgraded my ADSL line to ADSL2+ (24/1)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I was then downloading a bunch of torrents, all versions of
    >>>>> openSUSE 11.0. The new speed is just great after coming from a 1/1
    >>>>> connection
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It was great for a short while but then the trobles began.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I've found out that this kind of heavy high speed traffic is too
    >>>>> much for the ADSL modem to handle if it does NAT:ing.
    >>>>> It can't cope with it and crashes.
    >>>>
    >>>> ADSL 1 modems will struggle on ADSL2+ connections ! I replaced
    >>>> mine
    >>>> because of that. It was easier than messing about. The original
    >>>> modem is doing sterling service on another system.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> This is is an ADSL2+ modem.
    >>>
    >>> System Name:
    >>> ZyNOS F/W Version: V3.40(PE.11) | 05/22/2006
    >>> DSL FW Version:TI AR7 05.01.03.00
    >>> Standard:ADSL2+

    >>
    >> Its a make/name/brand I've never heard of. However the bit that
    >> says "Version:T1" suggests that its early ! Maybe there is a
    >> firmware update for it ?

    >
    > Zyxel. Latest but not very new FW.


    Zyxel, I have heard of ! But didn't associate it with "ZyNOS"

    >>> But further experience has shown that the problems haven't
    >>> disappeared after all.

    >>
    >> See above !
    >>
    >>> Now it's been bridging and openSUSE has been routing.
    >>>
    >>> I have now tested this with two different ADSL modems.
    >>> The one that is included in my new ADSL2+ package is in the mail.
    >>> So I'll be testing a new modem soon.
    >>>
    >>> Vahis

    >>
    >> Could be that the one supplied by your ISP has modified firmware !
    >> There are a number of UK ISP's do that trick. It nicely prevents you
    >> from using it with another ISP. BT are notorious for it.

    >
    > Also this Zyxel is originally from them.


    From BT ? I thought they used "Thompson" devices.

    >> A chap I know moved from BT and found that he couldn't make his modem
    >> work with the new provider. So he found out what the retail version
    >> was, downloaded the firmware, then flashed the modem to make it work
    >> for him. Just afterwards he then dumped it because his new ISP sent
    >> him a nice wireless one.
    >>

    >
    > Even moving from one DSLAM to another has influence.
    > Or staying in the same place while a neighbor subscribes for a line or
    > changes something or...


    Yes I agree ! the guy next door gets a slightly worse download rate
    than I do. Same ISP same exchange. We're about 700Mts away.

    > My distance to the DSLAM is over 3 km. That's pretty critical.
    > Fast connections in old telephone copper lines is something where you
    > also need a bit of luck.
    >
    >
    > Vahis


    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.

  13. Re: openSUSE as a router, how to?

    On 2008-06-26, Baron wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >
    >> On 2008-06-25, Baron wrote:
    >>> Vahis wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 2008-06-24, Baron wrote:
    >>>>> Vahis wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I upgraded my ADSL line to ADSL2+ (24/1)
    >>>>>>


    >>>>>
    >>>>> ADSL 1 modems will struggle on ADSL2+ connections ! I replaced
    >>>>> mine
    >>>>> because of that. It was easier than messing about. The original
    >>>>> modem is doing sterling service on another system.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> This is is an ADSL2+ modem.
    >>>>
    >>>> System Name:
    >>>> ZyNOS F/W Version: V3.40(PE.11) | 05/22/2006
    >>>> DSL FW Version:TI AR7 05.01.03.00
    >>>> Standard:ADSL2+
    >>>
    >>> Its a make/name/brand I've never heard of. However the bit that
    >>> says "Version:T1" suggests that its early ! Maybe there is a
    >>> firmware update for it ?

    >>
    >> Zyxel. Latest but not very new FW.

    >
    > Zyxel, I have heard of ! But didn't associate it with "ZyNOS"
    >


    Prestige 660HW-61.
    ZyNOS F/W Version: V3.40(PE.11) is the OS:
    http://www.tcgweb.com/netgear/index.htm



    >>>> Now it's been bridging and openSUSE has been routing.
    >>>>
    >>>> I have now tested this with two different ADSL modems.
    >>>> The one that is included in my new ADSL2+ package is in the mail.
    >>>> So I'll be testing a new modem soon.
    >>>>
    >>>> Vahis
    >>>
    >>> Could be that the one supplied by your ISP has modified firmware !
    >>> There are a number of UK ISP's do that trick. It nicely prevents you
    >>> from using it with another ISP. BT are notorious for it.

    >>
    >> Also this Zyxel is originally from them.

    >
    > From BT ? I thought they used "Thompson" devices.


    No. From my ISP. And the firmware is from Zyxel download.
    >
    >>> A chap I know moved from BT and found that he couldn't make his modem
    >>> work with the new provider. So he found out what the retail version
    >>> was, downloaded the firmware, then flashed the modem to make it work
    >>> for him. Just afterwards he then dumped it because his new ISP sent
    >>> him a nice wireless one.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Even moving from one DSLAM to another has influence.
    >> Or staying in the same place while a neighbor subscribes for a line or
    >> changes something or...

    >
    > Yes I agree ! the guy next door gets a slightly worse download rate
    > than I do. Same ISP same exchange. We're about 700Mts away.
    >
    >> My distance to the DSLAM is over 3 km. That's pretty critical.
    >> Fast connections in old telephone copper lines is something where you
    >> also need a bit of luck.
    >>

    I wish I lived in a telephone center, NOT.

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2