Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system - Suse

This is a discussion on Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system - Suse ; Just upgraded to Open Suse 11.0 from 10.3. One thing I noticed is that all my file systems that are in the reiser file system are not accessible. Can't even mount them... What gives? Since the reiser file system appears ...

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Thread: Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

  1. Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

    Just upgraded to Open Suse 11.0 from 10.3. One thing I noticed is
    that all my file systems that are in the reiser file system are not
    accessible. Can't even mount them... What gives?

    Since the reiser file system appears to be not a good thing to have
    anymore, how can one convert to the .ext3 file system?

    Thanks

  2. Re: Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

    On Mon, 23 Jun 2008 22:57:10 -0400, S.Vetter typed this message:

    > Just upgraded to Open Suse 11.0 from 10.3. One thing I noticed is that
    > all my file systems that are in the reiser file system are not
    > accessible. Can't even mount them... What gives?
    >
    > Since the reiser file system appears to be not a good thing to have
    > anymore, how can one convert to the .ext3 file system?
    >
    > Thanks


    Don't know how to convert but I have disk as reiserfs, root and home
    partitions ext3 on the other disk. My reiserfs mount without problem.

  3. Re: Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

    noi ance wrote:
    > On Mon, 23 Jun 2008 22:57:10 -0400, S.Vetter typed this message:
    >
    >> Just upgraded to Open Suse 11.0 from 10.3. One thing I noticed is that
    >> all my file systems that are in the reiser file system are not
    >> accessible. Can't even mount them... What gives?
    >>
    >> Since the reiser file system appears to be not a good thing to have
    >> anymore, how can one convert to the .ext3 file system?
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > Don't know how to convert but I have disk as reiserfs, root and home
    > partitions ext3 on the other disk. My reiserfs mount without problem.


    Got some really strange things going on here... I have a point point
    called /3x0-1 that has a reiserfs on it, on the /dev/sda2. I find that
    that this fs was 90% used. After "upgrading" to 11.0 I find that it is
    1% used! Is the contents really gone? Can I recover the contents? If
    not recoverable, I will consider switching to the OS from the most hated
    vendor around...
    Should have known better to upgrade to a x.0 version...

  4. Re: Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

    S.Vetter wrote:
    > Got some really strange things going on here... I have a point point
    > called /3x0-1 that has a reiserfs on it, on the /dev/sda2. I find that
    > that this fs was 90% used. After "upgrading" to 11.0 I find that it is
    > 1% used! Is the contents really gone? Can I recover the contents? If
    > not recoverable, I will consider switching to the OS from the most hated
    > vendor around...


    Mount it read only, look and tell us.

    > Should have known better to upgrade to a x.0 version...


    x.0 versions with SuSE, SUSE and now openSUSE are just a marketing tool.
    They have absolutely no technical meaning whatsoever. They could have
    easily called it openSUSE 10.4

    Almost no distribution uses the version numbering for technical reasons
    anymore.

    The reason is that development is a continuing process. On what could
    they possibly decide what a major and what a minor version would be?

    houghi
    --
    Theologians can pursuade themselves of anything. Anyone who can worship
    a trinity and insists that his religion is a monotheism can believe
    anything -- just give him time to rationalize it.
    Robert A. Heinlein, JOB: A Comedy of Justice

  5. Re: Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

    noi ance wrote:
    >On Mon, 23 Jun 2008 22:57:10 -0400, S.Vetter typed this message:


    >> Just upgraded to Open Suse 11.0 from 10.3. One thing I noticed is that
    >> all my file systems that are in the reiser file system are not
    >> accessible. Can't even mount them... What gives?
    >>
    >> Since the reiser file system appears to be not a good thing to have
    >> anymore, how can one convert to the .ext3 file system?
    >>
    >> Thanks


    >Don't know how to convert but I have disk as reiserfs, root and home
    >partitions ext3 on the other disk. My reiserfs mount without problem.


    I don't think you can simply convert. I'd wait until you
    install a new system. Then choose ext3 or whatever you want.

    --
    --- Paul J. Gans

  6. Re: Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

    Le Tue, 24 Jun 2008 16:32:30 +0000, Paul J Gans a √©crit¬*:

    > noi ance wrote:
    >>On Mon, 23 Jun 2008 22:57:10 -0400, S.Vetter typed this message:

    >
    >>> Just upgraded to Open Suse 11.0 from 10.3. One thing I noticed is
    >>> that all my file systems that are in the reiser file system are not
    >>> accessible. Can't even mount them... What gives?
    >>>
    >>> Since the reiser file system appears to be not a good thing to
    >>> have
    >>> anymore, how can one convert to the .ext3 file system?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >
    >>Don't know how to convert but I have disk as reiserfs, root and home
    >>partitions ext3 on the other disk. My reiserfs mount without problem.

    >
    > I don't think you can simply convert. I'd wait until you install a new
    > system. Then choose ext3 or whatever you want.


    He doesn't need to convert, it looks to me like there was an error in
    the installation where the disk was reformatted. When I installed SuSE 11.0
    the install erased the label of my Fedora 8 partition which could no longer
    boot. The weird thing is that instead of the install having the default as
    expert partitioning it defaults to partitioning for morons where it makes all
    the decisions for you. This is the microsoft approach that assumes that you
    are only using what you are installing at the moment.
    The default choice was my second hard disk where I have Fedora 8 while there
    were 2 unused partition on the first drive, one of them close to 100M for the
    /boot partition and one at 200G for the / partition.

    Novell has said that they intend to fully support ReiserFS. It is superior to
    ext3 by a long shot. The one thing I hate the most about ext3 is the forced
    file checks after a few reboots, usually 20 to 30 minutes. It tells me that
    I exceeded the 35 reboot after around 10 or 12 reboots.
    Is it possible to disable this **** completely so the check is only made
    when I want to do it? Not when I am in a hurry to boot on my system to check
    my EMAIL.


    --
    Barack Obama for President http://www.barackobama.com/
    http://home.comcast.net/~mcatudal
    We are the Cybernetic Entomology Experts

  7. Re: Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

    On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 14:53:09 -0500, Michel Catudal wrote:
    > The one thing I hate the most about ext3 is the forced file checks
    > after a few reboots, usually 20 to 30 > minutes. It tells me that I
    > exceeded the 35 reboot after around 10 or 12 reboots.

    Checking the file system for consistency on a regular basis is important,
    even more so when the file system is not cleanly unmounted.

    You need to refer to the manual page for tune2fs to fine tune the
    frequency of checking.

    QUOTE

    -c max-mount-counts

    Adjust the number of mounts after which the filesystem will be
    checked by e2fsck(8). If max-mount-counts is 0 or -1, the number
    of times the filesystem is mounted will be disregarded by e2fsck(8)
    and the kernel.

    Staggering the mount-counts at which filesystems are forcibly
    checked will avoid all filesystems being checked at one time
    when using journaled filesystems.

    You should strongly consider the consequences of disabling
    mount-count-dependent checking entirely. Bad disk drives,
    cables, memory, and kernel bugs could all corrupt a filesystem
    without marking the filesystem dirty or in error. If you are
    using journaling on your filesystem, your filesystem will never
    be marked dirty, so it will not normally be checked. A filesystem
    error detected by the kernel will still force an fsck on the
    next reboot, but it may already be too late to prevent data loss
    at that point.

    See also the -i option for time-dependent checking.

    UNQUOTE

  8. Re: Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

    On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 14:53:09 -0500
    Michel Catudal wrote:

    > Is it possible to disable this **** completely so the
    > check is only made when I want to do it? Not when I am in a hurry to
    > boot on my system to check my EMAIL.
    >


    Yep, it can be frustrating sometimes. Unfortunately I don't know
    enough about it to answer your question, except to ask if you
    considered using suspend to ram if its available to you?

    I usually only turn my PC off a couple of times a month, the rest of
    the time I just tell to suspend.

    - It uses no more electricity than if the machine was powered down
    (0.4watts)
    - The wakeup time is a speedy 2-3 seconds
    - My desktop is restored instantly to the state it powered down in, ie
    what I'm probably working on.

    I realise it didn't answer your question, but its a possible
    workaround.

    As always, ymmv.

  9. Re: Open Suse 11.0 and reiser file system

    On 2008-09-21, nordle wrote:
    > On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 14:53:09 -0500
    > Michel Catudal wrote:
    >
    >> Is it possible to disable this **** completely so the
    >> check is only made when I want to do it? Not when I am in a hurry to
    >> boot on my system to check my EMAIL.
    >>

    >
    > Yep, it can be frustrating sometimes. Unfortunately I don't know
    > enough about it to answer your question, except to ask if you
    > considered using suspend to ram if its available to you?
    >
    > I usually only turn my PC off a couple of times a month, the rest of
    > the time I just tell to suspend.
    >
    > - It uses no more electricity than if the machine was powered down
    > (0.4watts)
    > - The wakeup time is a speedy 2-3 seconds
    > - My desktop is restored instantly to the state it powered down in, ie
    > what I'm probably working on.
    >
    > I realise it didn't answer your question, but its a possible
    > workaround.
    >
    > As always, ymmv.


    I normally boot only when the kernel is updated.
    Then I watch 2 TB of checking because the "disks have gone over 60 days
    without checking, check forced".

    Recently I've booted a few extra times because of changing to new
    hardware, but I can already see the checks coming...

    I hate the day when I gave up Reiser

    The next time I get more disk space the file system needs to be
    carefully chosen, I hate this checking.

    I wonder if checking them manually every < 60 days or so would help?

    They could be unmounted and checked one by one regularly, I wonder if
    this would skip the 69 day-thingy?
    --
    Vahis
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    Congressman Wilson has an expression:
    "You can teach them to type, but you can't teach them to grow tits."

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