How to configure openSUSE 10.3 to be IPv6 capable? - Suse

This is a discussion on How to configure openSUSE 10.3 to be IPv6 capable? - Suse ; Hello! Situation: I have a small server running on openSUSE 10.3, which is tied up to the Internet over the private IP number 192.168.178.23. It maintains the private IP address 192.168.1.1 and has its own subnet 192.168.1.0. It has two ...

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Thread: How to configure openSUSE 10.3 to be IPv6 capable?

  1. How to configure openSUSE 10.3 to be IPv6 capable?

    Hello!

    Situation:
    I have a small server running on openSUSE 10.3, which is tied up to
    the Internet over the private IP number 192.168.178.23.
    It maintains the private IP address 192.168.1.1 and has its own subnet
    192.168.1.0. It has two Ethernet cards eth0 and eth1.
    Per DHCP via eth0 it gets assigned the IP address 192.168.178.23, and
    per eth1 it powers the net 192.168.1.0.
    Part of this net 192.168.1.0 is a dual-boot computer with the IP
    address 192.168.1.50 and a notebook under MacOSX, which is attached to
    the same net via WLAN and which gets the IP address 192.168.1.51 via
    my own DHCP deamon working on 192.168.1.1. This DHCP server is
    configured in such a way, that all temporarly added computers get IP
    addresses from a defined IP pool in contrast to my known computers
    with fixed, MAC-bound IP adresses. Additionally, I run on 192.168.1.1
    the DNS server Bind9.

    Problem/Question:
    I would like to now, how to configure this server in such a way that
    he gets along both with IPv4 and with IPv6. My question is now: where
    do I have now what to configure and where possibly touch which
    (configuration) files in order to come to this goal: provide
    functional IPv6 parallel to IPv4? I imagine, that it might not be
    sufficient, to just activate „IPv6“ in the routing configuration of
    openSUSE’s YaST to get the server full IPv6-ready (this simple switch
    in YaST activates/deactivates only the associated kernel module, as
    far as I know).
    Unfortunately, I am not very trained in writing and calculating IPv6
    addresses. Not yet. :-)
    Therefore it would be grateful over each assistance for being able to
    convert the existing addresses if necessary. I assume, at least I also
    have to extend the DNS server configuration by a few AAAA records (but
    with what IPv6 addresses?). Likewise the DHCPD configuration. What is
    with my running mail server postfix? What with the whole bunch of
    other services, which also still run on the system? I think, at the
    end and if everything is tidy and cleanly configured, I should be able
    to successfully do some ping6 commands to my own IPv6 clients and some
    remote IPv6 clients of the WWW (if the latter doesn’t succed, because
    my ISP doesn’t provide IPv6, then at least I want to be able to use
    IPv6 in my home intranet), and I should see some IPv6 adresses in my
    client computers, which they got via DHCP from the servers DHCP and
    DNS deamon.

    Who can help me to make my little home server capable and ready to use
    IPv6 and IPv4 side by side?

    Thanks in advance,
    Sierk

  2. Re: How to configure openSUSE 10.3 to be IPv6 capable?

    sierkb@gmx.de wrote:

    > Hello!
    >
    > Situation:
    > I have a small server running on openSUSE 10.3, which is tied up to
    > the Internet over the private IP number 192.168.178.23.
    > It maintains the private IP address 192.168.1.1 and has its own subnet
    > 192.168.1.0. It has two Ethernet cards eth0 and eth1.
    > Per DHCP via eth0 it gets assigned the IP address 192.168.178.23, and
    > per eth1 it powers the net 192.168.1.0.
    > Part of this net 192.168.1.0 is a dual-boot computer with the IP
    > address 192.168.1.50 and a notebook under MacOSX, which is attached to
    > the same net via WLAN and which gets the IP address 192.168.1.51 via
    > my own DHCP deamon working on 192.168.1.1. This DHCP server is
    > configured in such a way, that all temporarly added computers get IP
    > addresses from a defined IP pool in contrast to my known computers
    > with fixed, MAC-bound IP adresses. Additionally, I run on 192.168.1.1
    > the DNS server Bind9.
    >
    > Problem/Question:
    > I would like to now, how to configure this server in such a way that
    > he gets along both with IPv4 and with IPv6. My question is now: where
    > do I have now what to configure and where possibly touch which
    > (configuration) files in order to come to this goal: provide
    > functional IPv6 parallel to IPv4? I imagine, that it might not be
    > sufficient, to just activate „IPv6“ in the routing configuration of
    > openSUSE’s YaST to get the server full IPv6-ready (this simple switch
    > in YaST activates/deactivates only the associated kernel module, as
    > far as I know).
    > Unfortunately, I am not very trained in writing and calculating IPv6
    > addresses. Not yet. :-)
    > Therefore it would be grateful over each assistance for being able to
    > convert the existing addresses if necessary. I assume, at least I also
    > have to extend the DNS server configuration by a few AAAA records (but
    > with what IPv6 addresses?). Likewise the DHCPD configuration. What is
    > with my running mail server postfix? What with the whole bunch of
    > other services, which also still run on the system? I think, at the
    > end and if everything is tidy and cleanly configured, I should be able
    > to successfully do some ping6 commands to my own IPv6 clients and some
    > remote IPv6 clients of the WWW (if the latter doesn’t succed, because
    > my ISP doesn’t provide IPv6, then at least I want to be able to use
    > IPv6 in my home intranet), and I should see some IPv6 adresses in my
    > client computers, which they got via DHCP from the servers DHCP and
    > DNS deamon.
    >
    > Who can help me to make my little home server capable and ready to use
    > IPv6 and IPv4 side by side?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Sierk


    If I understand the situation correctly, the problem is not with openSuse
    but rather with the DNS of your local ISP. In the US, our Internet and
    communications services are lower than many third world countries and much,
    much more costly.

    --
    Later,
    Darrell Stec darstec@neo.rr.com

    Webpage Sorcery
    http://webpagesorcery.com
    We Put the Magic in Your Webpages

  3. Re: How to configure openSUSE 10.3 to be IPv6 capable?

    sierkb@gmx.de wrote:
    > Hello!
    >
    > Situation:
    > I have a small server running on openSUSE 10.3, which is tied up to
    > the Internet over the private IP number 192.168.178.23.
    > It maintains the private IP address 192.168.1.1 and has its own subnet
    > 192.168.1.0. It has two Ethernet cards eth0 and eth1.
    > Per DHCP via eth0 it gets assigned the IP address 192.168.178.23, and
    > per eth1 it powers the net 192.168.1.0.
    > Part of this net 192.168.1.0 is a dual-boot computer with the IP
    > address 192.168.1.50 and a notebook under MacOSX, which is attached to
    > the same net via WLAN and which gets the IP address 192.168.1.51 via
    > my own DHCP deamon working on 192.168.1.1. This DHCP server is
    > configured in such a way, that all temporarly added computers get IP
    > addresses from a defined IP pool in contrast to my known computers
    > with fixed, MAC-bound IP adresses. Additionally, I run on 192.168.1.1
    > the DNS server Bind9.
    >
    > Problem/Question:
    > I would like to now, how to configure this server in such a way that
    > he gets along both with IPv4 and with IPv6. My question is now: where
    > do I have now what to configure and where possibly touch which
    > (configuration) files in order to come to this goal: provide
    > functional IPv6 parallel to IPv4? I imagine, that it might not be
    > sufficient, to just activate „IPv6“ in the routing configuration of
    > openSUSE’s YaST to get the server full IPv6-ready (this simple switch
    > in YaST activates/deactivates only the associated kernel module, as
    > far as I know).


    IPv6 ideally is designed to be self configuring. You'll get
    an IPv6 address assigned on an IPv6 network if such is present.
    By default, IPv6 should on.... doing an ipconfig should show
    your link local IPv6 address. You'll get a global address if
    you are on a network with IPv6 on it.

    > Unfortunately, I am not very trained in writing and calculating IPv6
    > addresses. Not yet. :-)
    > Therefore it would be grateful over each assistance for being able to
    > convert the existing addresses if necessary. I assume, at least I also
    > have to extend the DNS server configuration by a few AAAA records (but
    > with what IPv6 addresses?). Likewise the DHCPD configuration. What is
    > with my running mail server postfix? What with the whole bunch of
    > other services, which also still run on the system? I think, at the


    BIND has handled IPv6 entries and listening to an IPv6 interface for
    some time. As for DHCP, you can use the latest version of the DHCP
    server and get IPv6 handling, however, again, it's very BETA, things
    like relaying don't work and you'll have to run two copies
    of it, one for IPv4 request and one for IPv6... but again, on an
    IPv6 network, the routing, IP assignments, are done by IPv6
    and a dhcp server isn't required. About the only things that might
    be of use it DDNS integration.

    > end and if everything is tidy and cleanly configured, I should be able
    > to successfully do some ping6 commands to my own IPv6 clients and some
    > remote IPv6 clients of the WWW (if the latter doesn’t succed, because
    > my ISP doesn’t provide IPv6, then at least I want to be able to use
    > IPv6 in my home intranet), and I should see some IPv6 adresses in my
    > client computers, which they got via DHCP from the servers DHCP and
    > DNS deamon.


    You won't be able to do anything IPv6 unless the infrastructure is there
    end to end. That is, unless all of your network equipment is IPv6
    ready and your ISP is IPv6 ready, you won't be able to "ping" IPv6
    WWW addresses on the Internet.

    >
    > Who can help me to make my little home server capable and ready to use
    > IPv6 and IPv4 side by side?


    Many services are NOT IPv6 ready today. These include DHCP (though it
    is getting there), NFS, NIS, most databases, etc. (the list is actually
    quite large). Just something to consider. IPv6 is FAR from prime
    time yet.

    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Sierk


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