How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interface setting - Suse

This is a discussion on How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interface setting - Suse ; (Similar posting also posted in the SUSE Forum::Wirless Network) My wireless network card (D-link Air Plus DWL-G520) stopped working and lost the network connectivity after an update (automatic update) was installed on April 12, 2008. Unfortunately, I didn't check what ...

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Thread: How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interface setting

  1. How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interface setting

    (Similar posting also posted in the SUSE Forum::Wirless Network)

    My wireless network card (D-link Air Plus DWL-G520) stopped working
    and lost the network connectivity after an update (automatic update)
    was installed on April 12, 2008. Unfortunately, I didn't check what
    update was that.

    I am using madwifi driver for my wireless card.
    I reinstalled the driver, but it didn't help.
    Later I found a temporary work around solution with following steps:

    1) Assigned the Wireless Interface Firewall Zone to "External" from
    YAST (Yast Control Centre -> Network Devices -> Network Cards ->
    Network Settings -> Configure -> General -> Firewall Zone -> External)
    2) Configure the Wireless Interface Firewall Zone to "External" from
    "Firewall Configuration" (Yast Control Centre -> Security and Users ->
    Firewall -> Interface -> Change -> Interface Zone to "External")

    But, if I reboot the PC, then I find the Network Device's Firewall (#1
    above) configuration resets to " No Zone, All Traffic Blocked".

    I believe it is happening for "Firewall Setup" for which interface's
    firewall zone is not saved after configured.

    Please let me know how to make the above configuration permanent ?

  2. Re: How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interface setting

    On 2008-04-16 06:03, akarui.tomodachi@gmail.com wrote:
    > (Similar posting also posted in the SUSE Forum::Wirless Network)
    >
    > My wireless network card (D-link Air Plus DWL-G520) stopped working
    > and lost the network connectivity after an update (automatic update)
    > was installed on April 12, 2008. Unfortunately, I didn't check what
    > update was that.
    >
    > I am using madwifi driver for my wireless card.
    > I reinstalled the driver, but it didn't help.
    > Later I found a temporary work around solution with following steps:
    >
    > 1) Assigned the Wireless Interface Firewall Zone to "External" from
    > YAST (Yast Control Centre -> Network Devices -> Network Cards ->
    > Network Settings -> Configure -> General -> Firewall Zone -> External)
    > 2) Configure the Wireless Interface Firewall Zone to "External" from
    > "Firewall Configuration" (Yast Control Centre -> Security and Users ->
    > Firewall -> Interface -> Change -> Interface Zone to "External")
    >
    > But, if I reboot the PC, then I find the Network Device's Firewall (#1
    > above) configuration resets to " No Zone, All Traffic Blocked".
    >
    > I believe it is happening for "Firewall Setup" for which interface's
    > firewall zone is not saved after configured.
    >
    > Please let me know how to make the above configuration permanent ?


    What you did should be permanent, so if not, you maybe locked some
    config file by editing it by hand so YaST could not save it,
    and instead created a new config file somewhere,
    with a name ending with .SuSEconfig

    Try:

    find /etc -name \*.SuSEconfig

    if you find one, you need to resolve it, or YaST is unable to configure
    that function.

    /bb

  3. Re: How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interfacesetting

    I don't see any config file other than a log file.

    The find from the root directry outputs as below:

    Linux-2000:/ # find ./ -name "*.SuSEconfig"
    ../var/log/YaST2/y2log.SuSEconfig

    Every time after start, I have to manually configure the wireless
    interface (as mentioned before) to get connected.



  4. Re: How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interface setting

    akarui.tomodachi@gmail.com wrote:


    This is not a flame. This is advice on how to get better help and keep
    this newsgroup clean
    Short story: Please read http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/

    Long story:
    Google unfortunately decided not to use the standards of quoting on
    Usenet. There are several solutions to this problem. The best is to use a
    newsreader. For Windows there is e.g. FreeAgent and for Linux there is
    Pan, Knode or slrn, among others.

    Just point your newsreader to your providers Usenet server. If they do not
    have a Usenetserver, look up a payserver, like http://giganews.com or a
    free server like news.sunsite.dk (registration required)

    Now what if you are not at home all the time and that is your reason to
    select google? Glad you asked.
    If you have a fixed connection, you can use a dyndns server to make a
    connection to your home linux machine over ssl and use anything that is
    on your home computer.
    e.g. ssh home.example.com and then run slrn. GUI interfaces are possible
    as well on any OS.
    If you are unable to keep a connection up, you can register at
    http://www.rootshell.be and then connect to there and use slrn on that
    machine. slrn is textbased and might be scary at first. As Usenet is
    text anyway, you will very fast learn how to use it and configure it.

    Only if all else fails and you have no option in using Usnet in any other
    way, including waiting till you get home, you can use Google. You can
    still quote correctly as described on the following page:
    http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/

    Understand that many people already filter out google postings. So best
    look for an alternative. Usenet is not WWW. If you want WWW, look up
    a webforum. This is not a webforum.

    I sympathize with your problems, and am more than willing to help you
    solve them. To do so you should follow the correct quoting principles
    and good Netiquette explained in this FAQ available at;
    http://www.plainfaqs.org/linux/

    Until then I and many other regulars who could give you good advice
    won't do so. So in the interest of solving your problems, quote correctly
    and ask Google to reinstate the correct way of quoting.

    Remember: this was not a flame, this was helping you to get the best response
    and help possible.

    houghi
    --
    This was written under the influence of the following:
    | Artist : Die Toten Hosen
    | Song : Das Wort zum Sonntag
    | Album : Bis zum bitteren Ende

  5. Re: How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interfacesetting

    On 2008-04-17 08:02, akarui.tomodachi@gmail.com wrote:
    > I don't see any config file other than a log file.
    >
    > The find from the root directry outputs as below:
    >
    > Linux-2000:/ # find ./ -name "*.SuSEconfig"
    > ./var/log/YaST2/y2log.SuSEconfig
    >
    > Every time after start, I have to manually configure the wireless
    > interface (as mentioned before) to get connected.
    >
    >


    My suggestion was to look for them in the /etc tree , but since you found
    none, it was not that problem.

    But since you found a log file, why not read it and look for something
    that can give you a hint about what was wrong.

    You can also run /sbin/SuSEconfig by hand and look for errors and warnings.

    /bb

  6. Re: How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interfacesetting

    > My suggestion was to look for them in the /etc tree , but since you found
    > none, it was not that problem.
    >
    > But since you found a log file, why not read it and look for something
    > that can give you a hint about what was wrong.
    >
    > /bb
    >

    The "tail" of the log file shows as below. I also observed (using
    "tail -f") while the wireless card's firewall configuration was set
    from YAST, but nothing was logged into this file.

    /** tail of the log file **/
    Linux-2000:/etc/sysconfig # tail /var/log/YaST2/y2log.SuSEconfig
    Running module words only
    Reading /etc/sysconfig and updating the system...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.words...
    Finished.
    Starting SuSEconfig, the SuSE Configuration Tool...
    Running in verbose mode.
    Running in full featured mode.
    Reading /etc/sysconfig and updating the system...
    skipping modules
    Finished.
    Linux-2000:/etc/sysconfig #
    /*************************/

    > You can also run /sbin/SuSEconfig by hand and look for errors and warnings.


    I get following outputs after running the "./sbin/SuSEconfig". No
    error found.
    /************************
    Linux-2000:/sbin # ./SuSEconfig
    Starting SuSEconfig, the SuSE Configuration Tool...
    Running in full featured mode.
    Reading /etc/sysconfig and updating the system...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.desktop-file-utils...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.fonts...
    Creating fonts.{scale,dir} files ...........
    /etc/fonts/suse-font-dirs.conf unchanged
    /etc/fonts/suse-hinting.conf unchanged
    /etc/fonts/suse-bitmaps.conf unchanged
    Creating cache files for
    fontconfig .................................................
    generating java font setup
    Warning: cannot find a sans serif Japanese font. Japanese in Java
    might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a serif Japanese font. Japanese in Java might not
    work.
    Warning: cannot find a sans serif simplified Chinese font. Simplified
    Chinese in Java might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a serif simplified Chinese font. Simplified
    Chinese in Java might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a sans serif traditional Chinese font.
    Traditional Chinese in Java might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a serif traditional Chinese font. Traditional
    Chinese in Java might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a sans serif Korean font. Korean in Java might
    not work.
    Warning: cannot find a serif Korean font. Korean in Java might not
    work.
    writing /usr/lib/jvm/java-1.5.0-sun-1.5.0_update15/jre/lib/
    fontconfig.SuSE.properties
    Generating CJK setup for xpdf ...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.gnome-vfs2...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.groff...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.gtk2...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.ispell...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.perl...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.permissions...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.postfix...
    Setting up postfix local as MDA...
    Setting SPAM protection to "off"...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.scpm...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.words...
    Finished.
    Linux-2000:/sbin #
    /******************************************/


  7. Re: How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interfacesetting

    On Apr 17, 4:31 am, birre wrote:
    > On 2008-04-17 08:02, akarui.tomoda...@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    > > I don't see any config file other than a log file.

    >
    > > The find from the root directry outputs as below:

    >
    > > Linux-2000:/ # find ./ -name "*.SuSEconfig"
    > > ./var/log/YaST2/y2log.SuSEconfig

    >
    > > Every time after start, I have to manually configure the wireless
    > > interface (as mentioned before) to get connected.

    >
    > My suggestion was to look for them in the /etc tree , but since you found
    > none, it was not that problem.
    >
    > But since you found a log file, why not read it and look for something
    > that can give you a hint about what was wrong.
    >
    > You can also run /sbin/SuSEconfig by hand and look for errors and warnings.
    >
    > /bb


    I don't see any error while running ./sbin/SuSEconfig:
    /***************
    Linux-2000:/sbin # ./SuSEconfig
    Starting SuSEconfig, the SuSE Configuration Tool...
    Running in full featured mode.
    Reading /etc/sysconfig and updating the system...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.desktop-file-utils...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.fonts...
    Creating fonts.{scale,dir} files ...........
    /etc/fonts/suse-font-dirs.conf unchanged
    /etc/fonts/suse-hinting.conf unchanged
    /etc/fonts/suse-bitmaps.conf unchanged
    Creating cache files for
    fontconfig .................................................
    generating java font setup
    Warning: cannot find a sans serif Japanese font. Japanese in Java
    might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a serif Japanese font. Japanese in Java might not
    work.
    Warning: cannot find a sans serif simplified Chinese font. Simplified
    Chinese in Java might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a serif simplified Chinese font. Simplified
    Chinese in Java might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a sans serif traditional Chinese font.
    Traditional Chinese in Java might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a serif traditional Chinese font. Traditional
    Chinese in Java might not work.
    Warning: cannot find a sans serif Korean font. Korean in Java might
    not work.
    Warning: cannot find a serif Korean font. Korean in Java might not
    work.
    writing /usr/lib/jvm/java-1.5.0-sun-1.5.0_update15/jre/lib/
    fontconfig.SuSE.properties
    Generating CJK setup for xpdf ...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.gnome-vfs2...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.groff...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.gtk2...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.ispell...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.perl...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.permissions...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.postfix...
    Setting up postfix local as MDA...
    Setting SPAM protection to "off"...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.scpm...
    Executing /sbin/conf.d/SuSEconfig.words...
    Finished.
    ***********************/

  8. Re: How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interfacesetting

    On 2008-04-18 04:12, akarui.tomodachi@gmail.com wrote:

    > I don't see any error while running ./sbin/SuSEconfig:


    I'm out of ideas, but read the files in /etc/sysconfig/network, and
    the file /etc/sysconfig/SuSEfirewall2 , and identify the faulty settings.

    Run YaST2 again, and setup the card to managed, start on boot, no usercontrol,
    no network manager , and save.

    Check if it was saved as you expected in config and ifcfg-eth-id

    I don't think I can help much here, maybe better you dig the wiki for more info,
    or maybe someone else has any hints.

    /bb

  9. Re: How to save the Firewall Zone setup for wireless Interfacesetting

    On Apr 21, 4:25 am, birre wrote:
    > On 2008-04-18 04:12, akarui.tomoda...@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    > > I don't see any error while running ./sbin/SuSEconfig:

    >
    > I'm out of ideas, but read the files in /etc/sysconfig/network, and
    > the file /etc/sysconfig/SuSEfirewall2 , and identify the faulty settings.
    >
    > Run YaST2 again, and setup the card to managed, start on boot, no usercontrol,
    > no network manager , and save.
    >
    > Check if it was saved as you expected in config and ifcfg-eth-id
    >
    > I don't think I can help much here, maybe better you dig the wiki for more info,
    > or maybe someone else has any hints.
    >
    > /bb


    I am totally lost and this problem is very annoying. Every time I have
    to "manually" configure the "Firewall setup for the Interface" to get
    the connection started.
    Anyway, according to Birre's sugestion, I checked both "/etc/sysconfig/
    network/config" and "/etc/sysconfig/network/ifcfg-ath0" file. Nothing
    unusual found.

    /****** Content of the ifcfg-ath0 **********/
    BOOTPROTO='dhcp+autoip'
    BROADCAST=''
    ETHTOOL_OPTIONS=''
    IPADDR=''
    MTU=''
    NAME='D-Link AirPlus DWL-G520 Wireless PCI Adapter(rev.B)'
    NETMASK=''
    NETWORK=''
    REMOTE_IPADDR=''
    STARTMODE='auto'
    USERCONTROL='no'
    WIRELESS_AP=''
    WIRELESS_AUTH_MODE='no-encryption'
    WIRELESS_BITRATE='auto'
    WIRELESS_CA_CERT=''
    WIRELESS_CHANNEL=''
    WIRELESS_CLIENT_CERT=''
    WIRELESS_CLIENT_KEY=''
    WIRELESS_CLIENT_KEY_PASSWORD=''
    WIRELESS_DEFAULT_KEY='0'
    WIRELESS_EAP_AUTH=''
    WIRELESS_EAP_MODE=''
    WIRELESS_ESSID=''
    WIRELESS_FREQUENCY=''
    WIRELESS_KEY=''
    WIRELESS_KEY_0=''
    WIRELESS_KEY_1=''
    WIRELESS_KEY_2=''
    WIRELESS_KEY_3=''
    WIRELESS_KEY_LENGTH='128'
    WIRELESS_MODE='Managed'
    WIRELESS_NICK=''
    WIRELESS_NWID=''
    WIRELESS_PEAP_VERSION=''
    WIRELESS_POWER='yes'
    WIRELESS_WPA_ANONID=''
    WIRELESS_WPA_IDENTITY=''
    WIRELESS_WPA_PASSWORD=''
    WIRELESS_WPA_PSK=''
    *****/


    /****** Content of the config **********/
    ## Path: Network/General
    ## Description: Set some general network configuration
    ## Type: string("","-","+")
    ## Default: "+"
    ## ServiceRestart: network
    #
    # DEFAULT_BROADCAST is used when no individual BROADCAST is set. It
    can get one
    # of the following values:
    # "" : don't set a broadcast address
    # "-" : use IPADDR with all host bits deleted
    # "+" : use IPADDR with all host bits set
    DEFAULT_BROADCAST="+"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: yes
    # sometimes we want some script to be executed after an interface has
    been
    # brought up, or before an interface is taken down.
    # default dir is /etc/sysconfig/network/if-up.d for POST_UP and
    # /etc/sysconfig/network/if-down.d for PRE_DOWN
    # Note: if you use NetworkManager then down scripts will be called
    after the
    # interface is down and not before.
    GLOBAL_POST_UP_EXEC="yes"
    GLOBAL_PRE_DOWN_EXEC="yes"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: no
    # If ifup should check if an ip address is already in use, set this to
    yes.
    # Make sure that packet sockets (CONFIG_PACKET) are supported in the
    kernel,
    # since this feature uses arping, which depends on that.
    # Also be aware that this takes one second per interface; consider
    that when
    # setting up a lot of interfaces.
    CHECK_DUPLICATE_IP="no"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: no
    # Switch on/off debug messages for all network configuration stuff. If
    set to no
    # most scripts can enable it locally with "-o debug".
    DEBUG="no"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: yes
    # All error and info messages from network and hardware configuration
    scripts go
    # to stderr. Most tools that call sysconfig scripts (udev, rcnetwork,
    scpm,
    # YaST) catch these messages and can log them. So some messages appear
    twice in
    # syslog. If you don't like that, then set USE_SYSLOG=no.
    USE_SYSLOG="yes"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: yes
    # There are some services (ppp, ippp, dhcp-client, pcmcia, hotplug)
    that have to
    # change the /etc/resolv.conf dynamically at certain times. E.g. if
    ppp/ippp
    # establishes a connection and is supplied by the peer with a list of
    # nameservers. Or pcmcia needs to set the correct nameserver for the
    choosen
    # configuration scheme. If you don't like these services to change
    # /etc/resolv.conf at all, then set this variable to "no".
    # If unsure, leave it at the default (which is "yes").
    #
    MODIFY_RESOLV_CONF_DYNAMICALLY="yes"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: no
    # Like MODIFY_RESOLV_CONF_DYNAMICALLY, except it modifies
    # /etc/named.d/forwarders.conf instead of resolv.conf.
    # If unsure, leave it at the default (which is "no").
    #
    MODIFY_NAMED_CONF_DYNAMICALLY="no"

    ## Type: string
    ## Default: ""
    # If you need a special nameserver that should always be prepended to
    the list
    # of dynamically changed nameservers, you may add it here.
    #
    MODIFY_RESOLV_CONF_STATIC_DNS=""

    # Handling of network connections
    # ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    # These features are designed for the convenience of the experienced
    # user. If you encounter problems you don't understand then switch
    # them off. That is the default.
    # Please do not complain if you get troubles. But if you want help to
    # make them smarter write to .

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: no
    #
    # If you are interested in the connections and nfs mounts that use a
    # network interface, you can set CONNECTION_SHOW_WHEN_IFSTATUS="yes".
    # Then you will see them with 'ifstatus ' (or 'ifstatus
    # ')
    # This one _should_ never harm
    #
    CONNECTION_SHOW_WHEN_IFSTATUS="no"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: no
    #
    # If an interface should be set down only if there are no active
    # connections, then use CONNECTION_CHECK_BEFORE_IFDOWN="yes"
    #
    CONNECTION_CHECK_BEFORE_IFDOWN="no"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: no
    #
    # If these connetions (without the nfs mounts) should be closed when
    # shutting down an interface, set
    CONNECTION_CLOSE_BEFORE_IFDOWN="yes".
    # WARNING: Be aware that this may terminate applications which need
    # one of these connections!
    #
    CONNECTION_CLOSE_BEFORE_IFDOWN="no"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: no
    #
    # If you are a mobile laptop user and like even nfs mounts to be
    # closed when you leave your current workplace, then set
    # CONNECTION_UMOUNT_NFS_BEFORE_IFDOWN="yes". This does only work
    # if CONNECTION_CLOSE_BEFORE_IFDOWN="yes", too.
    # WARNING: Be aware that this may terminate applications which use
    # these nfs mounts as working directory. Be very carefull if your home
    # is mounted via nfs!!!
    # WARNING: This may even lead to hanging ifdown processes if there are
    # processes that could not be terminated. If you are using
    # hotpluggable devices (pcmcia, usb, firewire), first shut them down
    # before unplugging!
    #
    CONNECTION_UMOUNT_NFS_BEFORE_IFDOWN="no"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: no
    #
    # If terminating processes that use a connection or nfs mount is not
    # enough, then they can be killed after an unsuccesfull termination.
    # If you want that set CONNECTION_SEND_KILL_SIGNAL="yes"
    #
    CONNECTION_SEND_KILL_SIGNAL="no"

    ## Type: string
    ## Default: ""
    #
    # Here you may specify which interfaces have to be up and configured
    properly
    # after 'rcnetwork start'. rcconfig will return 'failed' if any of
    these
    # interfaces is not up. You may use interface names as well but better
    use
    # hardware descriptions of the devices (eth-id- or eth-
    bus-... See
    # man ifup for 'hardware description'). The network start script will
    wait for
    # these interfaces, but not longer as set in WAIT_FOR_INTERFACES.
    # You need not to add dialup or tunnel interfaces here, only physical
    devices.
    # The interface 'lo' is always considered to be mandatory and can be
    omitted.
    #
    # If this variable is empty, rcnetwork tries to derive the list of
    mandatory
    # devices automatically from the list of existing configurations.
    Configurations
    # with names bus-pcmcia or bus-usb or with STARTMODE=hotplug are
    skipped. (try
    # '/etc/init.d/rc5.d/S*network start -o debug fake | grep MANDAT')
    MANDATORY_DEVICES=""

    ## Type: integer
    ## Default: 20
    #
    # Some interfaces need some time to come up or come asynchronously via
    hotplug.
    # WAIT_FOR_INTERFACES is a global wait for all mandatory interfaces in
    # seconds. If empty no wait occurs.
    #
    WAIT_FOR_INTERFACES="20"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: yes
    #
    # With this variable you can determine if the SuSEfirewall when
    enabled
    # should get started when network interfaces are started.
    FIREWALL="yes"

    ## Type: string
    ## Default: "eth*[0-9]|tr*[0-9]|wlan[0-9]|ath[0-9]"
    #
    # Automatically add a linklocal route to the matching interfaces.
    # This string is used in a bash "case" statement, so it may contain
    # '*', '[', ']' and '|' meta-characters.
    #
    LINKLOCAL_INTERFACES="eth*[0-9]|tr*[0-9]|wlan[0-9]|ath[0-9]"

    ## Type: string
    ## Default: "-f -I"
    #
    # Set default options for ifplugd. You may also set them in an ifcfg-*
    file
    # individually. Have a look at 'man ifplug' for details. We let
    ifplugd set the
    # interface UP when starting, because there are many interfaces where
    link beat
    # cannot be detected otherwise. If you want the interface to stay down
    then add
    # the option '-a'. If you like ifplugd to beep on cable (un)plug,
    remove '-b'.
    #
    IFPLUGD_OPTIONS="-f -I -b"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: no
    #
    # Instead of the usual network setup (now called 'NetControl') you may
    also use
    # 'NetworkManager' to control your interfaces.
    #
    # NetControl is what you were used to in SUSE Linux up to now. It has
    a wide
    # range of configurations means for setting up any number of different
    virtual
    # and real interfaces. It should be used if you:
    # - want a static network setup
    # - have many interfaces
    # - need VLAN, bonding, bridging, multiple IP addresses
    # - must restrict network control to root
    # It may also switch interfaces automatically, but lacks a usable GUI
    for normal
    # users.
    #
    # NetworkManager lets the user control interfaces and switches
    automatically if
    # network interfaces lose/gain physical connection. It should be used
    if you:
    # - move between networks frequently
    # and real interfaces. It should be used if you:
    # - want a static network setup
    # - have many interfaces
    # - need VLAN, bonding, bridging, multiple IP addresses
    # - must restrict network control to root
    # It may also switch interfaces automatically, but lacks a usable GUI
    for normal
    # users.
    #
    # NetworkManager lets the user control interfaces and switches
    automatically if
    # network interfaces lose/gain physical connection. It should be used
    if you:
    # - move between networks frequently
    # - want a GUI for network control
    # Especially on mobile computers that use mainly one wired and one
    wireless
    # interface NetworkManager will please you.
    #
    # If you are used to SCPM then you might probably stay with
    NetControl. But at
    # least try NetworkManager, because it can replace SCPM in some usage
    scenarios.
    #
    NETWORKMANAGER=no

    ## Type: int
    ## Default: 0
    #
    # When using NetworkManager you may define a timeout to wait for
    NetworkManager
    # to connect. Other network services may require the system to have a
    valid
    # network setup in order to succeed.
    #
    # This variable has no effect if NETWORKMANAGER=no
    #
    NM_ONLINE_TIMEOUT="0"

    ## Type: yesno
    ## Default: yes
    #
    # When using NetworkManager you may want to trigger special actions
    when an
    # interface comes up. NetworkManagerDispatcher is a daemon that
    listens to
    # dbus-messages that tell that an interface is up/down and triggers
    whatever
    # you like. Read more about it in the manpage to
    NetworkManagerDispatcher.
    #
    # This variable has no effect if NETWORKMANAGER=no
    #
    NM_DISPATCHER=yes
    ******/

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