Mysql - Suse

This is a discussion on Mysql - Suse ; houghi wrote: > David Bolt wrote: >> [0] IIRC, when you start up the mysql daemon for the first time, it asks >> you to set a password for user root at localhost and also for >> root@your.host.name using /usr/bin/mysqladmin. ...

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Thread: Mysql

  1. Re: Mysql

    houghi wrote:

    > David Bolt wrote:
    >> [0] IIRC, when you start up the mysql daemon for the first time, it asks
    >> you to set a password for user root at localhost and also for
    >> root@your.host.name using /usr/bin/mysqladmin. If you haven't done very
    >> much you might be lucky and find that command, including the password
    >> you set, in your bash history.

    >
    > The confusion comes from the fact that the user `root` on a system is
    > a user that has access to everything, while this is not true for a user
    > `root` in MySQL.
    >
    > There the user can be anybody, including `root` or `mysql_root` or
    > `anything_you_desire` and there has to be no relation perse between the
    > users on the system and the users in MySQL.
    > Even worse is that MySQL can work perfectly without the yser 'root' in
    > MySQL and on some places I read that having 'root' in MySQL could be a
    > security problem.
    >
    > Setting MySQL up is not the most logical thing to do. Hence bug #347149
    > Took me a long time to grasp that as well.
    >
    > houghi


    Thanks for this information. This helps clarify some problems I had in the
    past about root in SuSE & root for MySQL. I've read and re-read the
    documentation and have had some 'huh ?' moments as the documents are a bit
    terse and complicated. I think it would be nice if Yast had a module for
    setting up MySQL including a help assistant too.

    Anyway, thanks for pointing this (ROOT v root) out. Now I (we) know.

  2. Re: Mysql

    Michael Soibelman wrote:
    > Thanks for this information. This helps clarify some problems I had in the
    > past about root in SuSE & root for MySQL. I've read and re-read the
    > documentation and have had some 'huh ?' moments as the documents are a bit
    > terse and complicated. I think it would be nice if Yast had a module for
    > setting up MySQL including a help assistant too.
    >
    > Anyway, thanks for pointing this (ROOT v root) out. Now I (we) know.


    You are welcome. It is strange that this is something that is not often
    explained better. Especialy as the logins all start with login 'root'
    and that is not needed. So why use that as an example?

    A simple paragraph explaining the difference should help a LOT of people
    starting with MySQL

    houghi
    --
    They say pesticides have been linked to low sperm counts.
    In my opinion if you have bugs down there that are so bad
    you need to use a pesticide, you're not gonna get laid anyway.

  3. Re: Mysql

    David Bolt wrote:
    > On Sun, 30 Mar 2008, Blattus Slafaly 0/00 ? ? ? wrote:-
    >
    >
    >
    >> Why do I get this with mysqlshow?

    >
    > No idea. I don't use it.
    >
    >> mysqlshow: Access denied for user 'username'@'localhost' (using
    >> password: NO)

    >
    > Did you "create" a user with access to the database without a password?
    >
    >> and as root:
    >> mysqlshow: Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

    >
    > Either the root user doesn't have a password configured, or you've
    > entered the wrong one. Try using a console and use mysql:
    >
    > mysql -h localhost -u root
    >
    > This will try to log you in without a password. If it fails, try:
    >
    > mysql -h localhost -u root -p
    >
    > You'll be asked to enter the password for root[0].
    >
    >> why can't I access my own system?

    >
    > Because you aren't entering the correct details. Try the above, and see
    >
    >
    > [0] IIRC, when you start up the mysql daemon for the first time, it asks
    > you to set a password for user root at localhost and also for


    It did not ask me anything when I started msyld.

    > root@your.host.name using /usr/bin/mysqladmin. If you haven't done very
    > much you might be lucky and find that command, including the password
    > you set, in your bash history.
    >
    > Regards,
    > David Bolt
    >



    --
    Blattus Slafaly ? 3 7/8

  4. Re: Mysql

    Blattus Slafaly 0/00 ? ? ? wrote:

    > David Bolt wrote:
    >> On Sun, 30 Mar 2008, Blattus Slafaly 0/00 ? ? ? wrote:-
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> Why do I get this with mysqlshow?

    >>
    >> No idea. I don't use it.
    >>
    >>> mysqlshow: Access denied for user 'username'@'localhost' (using
    >>> password: NO)

    >>
    >> Did you "create" a user with access to the database without a password?
    >>
    >>> and as root:
    >>> mysqlshow: Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password:
    >>> YES)

    >>
    >> Either the root user doesn't have a password configured, or you've
    >> entered the wrong one. Try using a console and use mysql:
    >>
    >> mysql -h localhost -u root
    >>
    >> This will try to log you in without a password. If it fails, try:
    >>
    >> mysql -h localhost -u root -p
    >>
    >> You'll be asked to enter the password for root[0].
    >>
    >>> why can't I access my own system?

    >>
    >> Because you aren't entering the correct details. Try the above, and see
    >>
    >>
    >> [0] IIRC, when you start up the mysql daemon for the first time, it asks
    >> you to set a password for user root at localhost and also for

    >
    > It did not ask me anything when I started msyld.
    >

    Then you have not set up any users/passwords. Follow the advice given in
    this thread and do so now. David's suggestions would be a good start.

    Repeat. You have NOT set any users/passwords. Do so now. Then use one of
    the gui to administer your database(s).
    >> root@your.host.name using /usr/bin/mysqladmin. If you haven't done very
    >> much you might be lucky and find that command, including the password
    >> you set, in your bash history.
    >>
    >> Regards,
    >> David Bolt
    >>

    >
    >



  5. Re: Mysql

    David Bolt wrote:
    > On Sun, 30 Mar 2008, Blattus Slafaly 0/00 ? ? ? wrote:-
    >
    >
    >
    >> Why do I get this with mysqlshow?

    >
    > No idea. I don't use it.
    >
    >> mysqlshow: Access denied for user 'username'@'localhost' (using
    >> password: NO)

    >
    > Did you "create" a user with access to the database without a password?
    >
    >> and as root:
    >> mysqlshow: Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

    >
    > Either the root user doesn't have a password configured, or you've
    > entered the wrong one. Try using a console and use mysql:
    >
    > mysql -h localhost -u root
    >
    > This will try to log you in without a password. If it fails, try:
    >
    > mysql -h localhost -u root -p
    >
    > You'll be asked to enter the password for root[0].
    >
    >> why can't I access my own system?

    >
    > Because you aren't entering the correct details. Try the above, and see
    >
    >
    > [0] IIRC, when you start up the mysql daemon for the first time, it asks
    > you to set a password for user root at localhost and also for
    > root@your.host.name using /usr/bin/mysqladmin. If you haven't done very
    > much you might be lucky and find that command, including the password
    > you set, in your bash history.
    >
    > Regards,
    > David Bolt
    >


    It won't accept my hostname. I get up to mysqladmin version, works ok.

    Then mysqlshow fails. Mysqladmin -u root password new_password works,

    mysqladmin -u root -h my_system_hostname password mysql_root_password
    fails, cannot access with that hostname.

    I'm following the Suse Linux 10 Unleashed manual page 520 to 525. It
    makes me angry when I follow directions and they don't work.
    I uninstall the whole dam thing and deleted everything again.



    --
    Blattus Slafaly ? 3 7/8

  6. Re: Mysql

    On Mon, 31 Mar 2008, Blattus Slafaly 0/00 ? ? ? wrote:-

    >It won't accept my hostname. I get up to mysqladmin version, works ok.
    >
    >Then mysqlshow fails. Mysqladmin -u root password new_password works,
    >
    >mysqladmin -u root -h my_system_hostname password mysql_root_password
    >fails, cannot access with that hostname.


    I found that part of that problem was caused by having the host name
    entered into /etc/hosts. In my case I removed the entry:

    127.0.0.2 lion.davjam.org lion

    then logged in using:

    mysql -h localhost -u root -p

    After that, I entered these two commands:

    grant all privileges on *.* to 'root'@'lion.davjam.org' identified by '';
    grant grant option on *.* to 'root'@'lion.davjam.org' identified by '';

    The first command, despite saying all privileges, doesn't give the
    ability to grant users access rights. Using the second command gives the
    user that ability. After that, I logged out again and re-logged in
    using:

    mysql -h lion.davjam.org -u root -p

    and created a new user using:

    grant all privileges on test.* to 'username'@'' identified by '';


    >I'm following the Suse Linux 10 Unleashed manual page 520 to 525. It
    >makes me angry when I follow directions and they don't work.
    >I uninstall the whole dam thing and deleted everything again.


    Okay. First thing I do when something is that frustrating is to walk
    away from it, do something else and then return to it when I'm more
    relaxed. It saves me from doing things like uninstalling things when I'm
    only got to reinstall them later.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0a1
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  7. Re: Mysql

    On Sun, 30 Mar 2008, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:
    >> [0] IIRC, when you start up the mysql daemon for the first time, it asks
    >> you to set a password for user root at localhost and also for
    >> root@your.host.name using /usr/bin/mysqladmin. If you haven't done very
    >> much you might be lucky and find that command, including the password
    >> you set, in your bash history.

    >
    >The confusion comes from the fact that the user `root` on a system is
    >a user that has access to everything, while this is not true for a user
    >`root` in MySQL.


    The confusion is probably because, after freshly installing mysql and
    starting it for the first time, you get this[0]:

    lion:~ # rcmysql start
    Creating MySQL privilege database...
    Installing MySQL system tables...
    OK
    Filling help tables...
    OK
    PLEASE REMEMBER TO SET A PASSWORD FOR THE MySQL root USER !
    To do so, start the server, then issue the following commands:
    /usr/bin/mysqladmin -u root password 'new-password'
    /usr/bin/mysqladmin -u root -h lion.davjam.org password 'new-password'
    See the manual for more instructions.
    You can start the MySQL daemon with:
    cd /usr ; /usr/bin/mysqld_safe &

    You can test the MySQL daemon with mysql-test-run.pl
    cd mysql-test ; perl mysql-test-run.pl

    Please report any problems with the /usr/bin/mysqlbug script!

    The latest information about MySQL is available on the web at
    http://www.mysql.com
    Support MySQL by buying support/licenses at http://shop.mysql.com
    Updating MySQL privilege database...
    Looking for 'mysql' in: /usr/bin/mysql
    Looking for 'mysqlcheck' in: /usr/bin/mysqlcheck
    Running 'mysqlcheck'...
    mysql.columns_priv OK
    mysql.db OK
    mysql.func OK
    mysql.help_category OK
    mysql.help_keyword OK
    mysql.help_relation OK
    mysql.help_topic OK
    mysql.host OK
    mysql.proc OK
    mysql.procs_priv OK
    mysql.tables_priv OK
    mysql.time_zone OK
    mysql.time_zone_leap_second OK
    mysql.time_zone_name OK
    mysql.time_zone_transition OK
    mysql.time_zone_transition_type OK
    mysql.user OK
    Running 'mysql_fix_privilege_tables'...
    OK
    Starting service MySQL done

    >There the user can be anybody, including `root` or `mysql_root` or
    >`anything_you_desire` and there has to be no relation perse between the
    >users on the system and the users in MySQL.


    In a way, there is. That first user has the ability to do anything to
    the mysql daemon including creating and "deleting" users, although
    "deleting" users is probably the wrong term for it. To delete a user,
    you just revoke their access rights using:

    revoke all on *.* from 'user@hostname';

    and then they no longer have access to any of the databases.

    >Even worse is that MySQL can work perfectly without the yser 'root' in
    >MySQL and on some places I read that having 'root' in MySQL could be a
    >security problem.


    I've not read about that, but since I've not been chasing up that much
    on mysql, it wouldn't surprise me if I'd missed it. If you can, can you
    provide a citation for it?

    >Setting MySQL up is not the most logical thing to do.


    Presently it requires entering 2 commands straight after the initial
    start-up to set up the "root" users account and password. What's so hard
    about that?

    >Hence bug #347149
    >Took me a long time to grasp that as well.



    [0] after freshly installing mysql-Max on 10.3 (PPC)

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0a1
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  8. Re: Mysql

    On 2008-03-30, Michael Soibelman wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >
    >--------------------------snip------------------------------------
    >> I wish you could have started in a different manner.
    >> Now all I can say is the name of a movie that I have in my database:
    >>
    >>


    >>
    >> P.S. Your rediculous and crappy email address needs to be forced in
    >> slrn. But you probably have no idea what that means either.
    >>
    >> Vahis

    >
    > Thanks for the hilarious post ! I'm LOL right now.... ;-)


    > Obviously the group has helped you as your site is quite functional. Good
    > work. If only newbies would learn not to bitch to get help (i.e. attention
    > in this case). You have asked and received many times and I'm sure you'll
    > agree that intelligent questions (usually) get intelligent answers.
    >
    > Again, good work on your (it aint crappy) MySQl enabled site. You've done
    > well. Congratulations.
    >


    A lot of people have, indeed, especially David Bolt.
    Linux is there because of a lot of people in the first place.

    One of them was F.Z. He said among other things:
    "In the Fight between You and the World... Bet on the World"

    >
    > PHP, MySQL, Linux, SuSE & Vahis rock.


    Php is quite fascinating. Originally "Private Home Pages".

    I'll put another test on line soon, Gallery.

    I hope there are people here who know it...

    I'm thinking about putting it on a public test.
    There's a feature to hide albums. I'd like to see if they are any
    hard to find, I have a lot to hide...

    Vahis
    --
    Training new things here:
    http://waxborg.servepics.com
    "The only thing more expensive than training is the lack of it"
    Henry Ford

  9. Re: Mysql

    David Bolt wrote:
    >>There the user can be anybody, including `root` or `mysql_root` or
    >>`anything_you_desire` and there has to be no relation perse between the
    >>users on the system and the users in MySQL.

    >
    > In a way, there is.


    Thus my 'has to be'

    > That first user has the ability to do anything to
    > the mysql daemon including creating and "deleting" users, although
    > "deleting" users is probably the wrong term for it. To delete a user,
    > you just revoke their access rights using:


    The first user can be called 'root', but that is just a name. You could
    call the first user 'shirley'. The rights one 'root' user has, has no
    impact on the other 'root'. And as both are on the same system, this can
    confuse things even more.

    Also on a company system, you might have different people that need to
    log into the rights that the first user has in mysql, without the
    rights.

    > revoke all on *.* from 'user@hostname';
    >
    > and then they no longer have access to any of the databases.


    I think it is easier to use phpMyAdmin after you have setup the initial
    account. That however is a personal choice. There I can see that the
    command to remove a user is `DROP USER 'root'@'localhost';`
    Sure, disabeling the user is possible, if you want to enable the user
    later.

    >>Even worse is that MySQL can work perfectly without the yser 'root' in
    >>MySQL and on some places I read that having 'root' in MySQL could be a
    >>security problem.

    >
    > I've not read about that, but since I've not been chasing up that much
    > on mysql, it wouldn't surprise me if I'd missed it. If you can, can you
    > provide a citation for it?


    Uh, my machine where I do not use root as a first user. The reason _I_
    have for that is that I do not want to be using root, unless I realy,
    realy, realy need it.

    Obviously when I did Amarok with MySQL, I got to the page
    http://amarok.kde.org/wiki/MySQL_HowTo and all I needed to do was the
    following (as I already had a main user)
    $ mysql -p -u houghi
    CREATE DATABASE amarok;
    USE amarok;
    GRANT ALL ON amarok.* TO amarok@localhost IDENTIFIED BY 'pâsswØrd';
    FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

    and I was ready to go. (Obviously a fake password)
    instead of
    $ mysql -p -u root

    >>Setting MySQL up is not the most logical thing to do.

    >
    > Presently it requires entering 2 commands straight after the initial
    > start-up to set up the "root" users account and password. What's so hard
    > about that?


    It is not hard. It is confusing. Look around on the net about the amount
    of people asking the same question. And why not make a small script
    around it that does the apropriate test and if not, presents you with
    the apropriate questions.

    I remember I did many trials and it didn't work, because I misunderstood
    what they were saying and because of the confusion of root and root.
    Took me a LONG time to figure it out and it certainly held me back a few
    years(!) before I delved into it and figured it out.

    I tried everey few months and failed again. Finaly I figured it out by
    using phpMyAdmin.

    >>Hence bug #347149
    >>Took me a long time to grasp that as well.


    And this is the result. As they were already working on it internaly, I
    asume they also got a lot of requests from people who were confused as
    well.

    It is not because it is not hard that it is easy.

    houghi
    --
    houghi http://houghi.org http://www.plainfaqs.org/linux/
    http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html
    >
    > Today I went outside. My pupils have never been tinier...


  10. Re: Mysql

    Michael Soibelman wrote:
    > PHP, MySQL, Linux, SuSE & Vahis rock.


    SuSE? Please upgrade. 8.0 is not suported anymore and is insecure.
    Please upgrade to openSUSE. 10.3 is the latest version.

    I am amazed that people still run that. It is a danger to do that. No
    wonder MySQL was so hard to set up. You run an old version.

    houghi
    --
    houghi http://houghi.org http://www.plainfaqs.org/linux/
    http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html
    >
    > Today I went outside. My pupils have never been tinier...


  11. Re: Mysql

    houghi wrote:

    > Michael Soibelman wrote:
    >> PHP, MySQL, Linux, SuSE & Vahis rock.

    >
    > SuSE? Please upgrade. 8.0 is not suported anymore and is insecure.
    > Please upgrade to openSUSE. 10.3 is the latest version.
    >
    > I am amazed that people still run that. It is a danger to do that. No
    > wonder MySQL was so hard to set up. You run an old version.
    >
    > houghi


    Oh no ! Not that....

    Perhaps just '10.3' would have been a better description ? But wait. Is it
    openSUSE or is it OpenSuSE or is it OpenSUSE... ??

    So confused****** LOL

    ;-)


    P.S. I'm typing this from KDE4.... Using Knode-0.10.9...Adding Knode4 right
    now. Or is that Knode#$%..wait...starting konqueror 4.0.2 release 17.2

    Well anyway I'm running openSUSE 10.3 and at this very moment I'm installing
    more apps for KDE4 which, by the way, seems much better than a few weeks
    ago. At last I can add widgets to the system tray and not just to the
    desktop as before. This is getting much better and I'll try to use it for
    everyday use as it seems to be good enough. Time will tell.

    The old spelling will be verbotin (is that spelt right ?) immediately.

    openSUSE NOT OpenSuSE !!!

    Have a nice day. :-)

  12. Re: Mysql

    Michael Soibelman wrote:
    > The old spelling will be verbotin (is that spelt right ?) immediately.


    'verboten' from the verb 'verbieten'. More can be found via "Das
    Deutsche Wörterbuch"
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsches_W%C3%B6rterbuch which is in
    German for obvious reasons.

    houghi
    --
    How do you ask a man to be the last man to die in Iraq?
    How do you ask a man to be the last man to die for a mistake?

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