Video surveillance systems - Suse

This is a discussion on Video surveillance systems - Suse ; I need to set up a video surveillance system and could use some input on hardware/software that will run on preferably openSUSE 10.3. I'm a total novice at this and the small church I'm trying to set up is (typically) ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Video surveillance systems

  1. Video surveillance systems

    I need to set up a video surveillance system and could use some input on
    hardware/software that will run on preferably openSUSE 10.3. I'm a total
    novice at this and the small church I'm trying to set up is (typically)
    poor as the proverbial mouse, so cost is a major factor. The goal is to
    record vandalism rather than provide full security service.

    1. Assuming 4 cameras, what hardware (besides the video system) will I need?
    Looking at several video systems, I see that TV, VCD, and DVR outputs are
    common and most contain control panels that will format the output to
    generate a usable signal. What would be a good ballpark for a computer to
    manage the video?

    2. What do I need to look for in order to determine whether appropriate
    software exists?

    If anyone has experience with this I would welcome any and all comments -
    from "forget it" to links to products.

    --
    Will Honea

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  2. Re: Video surveillance systems

    Will Honea wrote:
    > I need to set up a video surveillance system and could use some input on
    > hardware/software that will run on preferably openSUSE 10.3. I'm a total
    > novice at this and the small church I'm trying to set up is (typically)
    > poor as the proverbial mouse, so cost is a major factor. The goal is to
    > record vandalism rather than provide full security service.
    >
    > 1. Assuming 4 cameras, what hardware (besides the video system) will I need?
    > Looking at several video systems, I see that TV, VCD, and DVR outputs are
    > common and most contain control panels that will format the output to
    > generate a usable signal. What would be a good ballpark for a computer to
    > manage the video?
    >
    > 2. What do I need to look for in order to determine whether appropriate
    > software exists?
    >
    > If anyone has experience with this I would welcome any and all comments -
    > from "forget it" to links to products.
    >


    So it sounds like you want to go digital, as opposed to analog. It also
    sounds like you want to record, and not just sit in front of a monitor
    and watch.

    I have played with this on the low end of things.. not sure about whats
    commercially available for Linux. d3data is a big player at the high
    end, but they run only on Windows I think.

    Check out motion. And zoneminder. I've used motion quite a bit. I used
    to use it with analog cameras that were fed to a PCI capture card.
    Lately I just use cheap usb webcams. The image quality is about the
    same, or better. The downside is usb cables can only stretch about 6
    feet or so, while analog video cables can go a lot farther. Setting up
    motion is nontrivial, but it works well once its setup. Beware: on suse
    10.3 some kind of dependency hell is going on with ffmpeg which it uses
    to generate videos. If you get motion from the build service it is built
    without ffmpeg support. If you try to build it yourself you'll have to
    find the right ffmpeg.

    As far as PC horsepower, if you are recording and serving 4 video
    streams simultaneously, people will say you need as much horsepower as
    you can afford. But you can get a dual core 2GHz (or greater) for a
    couple hundred $$ today. I think that would be adequate, esp with
    hardware mpg encoding.

    Another option is to go with these standalone network security cameras.
    You can get wired or wireless. And you can get them with HD quality
    video. I think this would be the easiest to setup. I'm planning to go
    this route. The only reason I'm doing it the way I do now is because I
    had PCs and webcams lying around.

    Or if you really want to go the painless route, you should look at a
    standalone surveillance DVR. It will simply record video for you. The
    reason for using Linux is you can customize the system to do anything
    you can think of. If you are a total novice, I think setting up a Linux
    surveillance system will cost you many man hours.

  3. Re: Video surveillance systems

    shimp wrote:

    > Will Honea wrote:
    >> I need to set up a video surveillance system and could use some input on
    >> hardware/software that will run on preferably openSUSE 10.3. I'm a total
    >> novice at this and the small church I'm trying to set up is (typically)
    >> poor as the proverbial mouse, so cost is a major factor. The goal is to
    >> record vandalism rather than provide full security service.
    >>
    >> 1. Assuming 4 cameras, what hardware (besides the video system) will I
    >> need? Looking at several video systems, I see that TV, VCD, and DVR
    >> outputs are common and most contain control panels that will format the
    >> output to
    >> generate a usable signal. What would be a good ballpark for a computer
    >> to manage the video?
    >>
    >> 2. What do I need to look for in order to determine whether appropriate
    >> software exists?
    >>
    >> If anyone has experience with this I would welcome any and all comments -
    >> from "forget it" to links to products.
    >>

    >
    > So it sounds like you want to go digital, as opposed to analog. It also
    > sounds like you want to record, and not just sit in front of a monitor
    > and watch.
    >
    > I have played with this on the low end of things.. not sure about whats
    > commercially available for Linux. d3data is a big player at the high
    > end, but they run only on Windows I think.
    >
    > Check out motion. And zoneminder. I've used motion quite a bit. I used
    > to use it with analog cameras that were fed to a PCI capture card.
    > Lately I just use cheap usb webcams. The image quality is about the
    > same, or better. The downside is usb cables can only stretch about 6
    > feet or so, while analog video cables can go a lot farther. Setting up
    > motion is nontrivial, but it works well once its setup. Beware: on suse
    > 10.3 some kind of dependency hell is going on with ffmpeg which it uses
    > to generate videos. If you get motion from the build service it is built
    > without ffmpeg support. If you try to build it yourself you'll have to
    > find the right ffmpeg.
    >
    > As far as PC horsepower, if you are recording and serving 4 video
    > streams simultaneously, people will say you need as much horsepower as
    > you can afford. But you can get a dual core 2GHz (or greater) for a
    > couple hundred $$ today. I think that would be adequate, esp with
    > hardware mpg encoding.
    >
    > Another option is to go with these standalone network security cameras.
    > You can get wired or wireless. And you can get them with HD quality
    > video. I think this would be the easiest to setup. I'm planning to go
    > this route. The only reason I'm doing it the way I do now is because I
    > had PCs and webcams lying around.
    >
    > Or if you really want to go the painless route, you should look at a
    > standalone surveillance DVR. It will simply record video for you. The
    > reason for using Linux is you can customize the system to do anything
    > you can think of. If you are a total novice, I think setting up a Linux
    > surveillance system will cost you many man hours.


    Good advice. The reason for digital is primarily cost vs. function. Going
    digital will allow remote monitoring if needed and save someone (me) a lot
    of trips at ungodly hours . A couple of wireless setups I'm looking at
    include motion detection hardware as well as on-demand IR illumination
    sources (although these have limited useful range). It appears that all
    the ingredients are there at reasonable prices if I can find the pieces to
    tie it together. The remote access is especially attractive in that the
    buildings already have commercial alarm systems that would benefit from
    some quick false alarm determination. The primary concern is not intrusion
    per se but identifying vandals as an added layer.

    --
    Will Honea

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  4. Re: Video surveillance systems

    On 2008-03-22 04:03, Will Honea wrote:
    > I need to set up a video surveillance system and could use some input on
    > hardware/software that will run on preferably openSUSE 10.3. I'm a total
    > novice at this and the small church I'm trying to set up is (typically)
    > poor as the proverbial mouse, so cost is a major factor. The goal is to
    > record vandalism rather than provide full security service.
    >
    > 1. Assuming 4 cameras, what hardware (besides the video system) will I need?
    > Looking at several video systems, I see that TV, VCD, and DVR outputs are
    > common and most contain control panels that will format the output to
    > generate a usable signal. What would be a good ballpark for a computer to
    > manage the video?
    >
    > 2. What do I need to look for in order to determine whether appropriate
    > software exists?
    >
    > If anyone has experience with this I would welcome any and all comments -
    > from "forget it" to links to products.
    >



    I'm not sure what you need, for surveillance I recommend ZM
    http://www.zoneminder.com/ ,
    the software start to take pictures when something moves in a protected
    zoon, and can make a video of the event.

    To just record video streams as a video recorder you can install MythTV
    and the plugins you need. (is in your repositories )

    /bb

  5. Re: Video surveillance systems

    birre wrote:

    > I'm not sure what you need, for surveillance I recommend ZM
    > http://www.zoneminder.com/ *,
    > the software start to take pictures when something moves in a protected
    > zoon, and can make a video of the event.
    >
    > To just record video streams as a video recorder you can install MythTV
    > and the plugins you need. (is in your repositories )
    >


    Thanks for the pointer - that covers all the functionality I had wished for
    and then some. Now to sort fact from fiction in the hardware adds...

    --
    Will Honea

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  6. Re: Video surveillance systems

    On 2008-03-25 23:41, Will Honea wrote:
    > birre wrote:
    >
    >> I'm not sure what you need, for surveillance I recommend ZM
    >> http://www.zoneminder.com/ ,
    >> the software start to take pictures when something moves in a protected
    >> zoon, and can make a video of the event.
    >>
    >> To just record video streams as a video recorder you can install MythTV
    >> and the plugins you need. (is in your repositories )
    >>

    >
    > Thanks for the pointer - that covers all the functionality I had wished for
    > and then some. Now to sort fact from fiction in the hardware adds...
    >


    Forgot to tell that you can install ZM as an rpm for opensuse 10.3
    if you add http://www.liquid-co.de/pub/suse/repositories/10.3/ to
    your install sources.

    /bb

  7. Re: Video surveillance systems

    Will Honea wrote:

    > I need to set up a video surveillance system and could use some input on
    > hardware/software that will run on preferably openSUSE 10.3. I'm a total
    > novice at this and the small church I'm trying to set up is (typically)
    > poor as the proverbial mouse, so cost is a major factor. The goal is to
    > record vandalism rather than provide full security service.
    >
    > 1. Assuming 4 cameras, what hardware (besides the video system) will I
    > need? Looking at several video systems, I see that TV, VCD, and DVR
    > outputs are common and most contain control panels that will format the
    > output to
    > generate a usable signal. What would be a good ballpark for a computer to
    > manage the video?
    >
    > 2. What do I need to look for in order to determine whether appropriate
    > software exists?
    >
    > If anyone has experience with this I would welcome any and all comments -
    > from "forget it" to links to products.
    >


    This might not be what you might expect in a comment but is a technique
    used by some jewelry and gold shops -- dummy cameras. As long as there is
    a cable feed going into conduit or the wall and they have a red light/led
    highly visible they are very effective, especially with signs announcing
    them.

    No hardware outside of casings and no software are needed. As long as the
    installers and administration keep their mouths shut, they are a very
    effective deterrent, believe it or not.

    On the other hand, have you ever noticed how often theft occurs when
    something just happens to be wrong with the surveillance equipment? Of
    course, ten to one it was an inside job.

    --
    Later,
    Darrell Stec darstec@neo.rr.com

    Webpage Sorcery
    http://webpagesorcery.com
    We Put the Magic in Your Webpages

  8. Re: Video surveillance systems

    Darrell Stec wrote:

    > This might not be what you might expect in a comment *but is a technique
    > used by some jewelry and gold shops -- dummy cameras. *As long as there is
    > a cable feed going into conduit or the wall and they have a red light/led
    > highly visible they are very effective, especially with signs announcing
    > them.
    >
    > No hardware outside of casings and no software are needed. *As long as the
    > installers and administration keep their mouths shut, they are a very
    > effective deterrent, believe it or not.
    >
    > On the other hand, have you ever noticed how often theft occurs when
    > something just happens to be wrong with the surveillance equipment? *Of
    > course, ten to one it was an inside job.


    Believe it or not, that was a part of the whole design . Cheaper and, as
    you point out, effective - especially when there are in fact active devices
    mixed in.

    It turns out that wireless systems become problematic - most systems I've
    looked at use a fixed set of channels in 2.4ghz band - competing with man +
    dog + refrigerators in addition to many wifi comm units - and allow only a
    finite number of choices. In the one I picked up for testing, that limit
    was channels 1-4, so there goes any hope of common hardware. When you add
    to that issue the quietly ignored requirement for power to the cameras it
    looks like my over-age, over-weight body is destined to mount ladders and
    crawl into tiny spaces to get this done. Like in the radio commercial, I
    need an enthusiastic 7 year old helper .

    As this moves forward it becomes a much more involved engineering task - and
    I retired when I figured I had done more than my share of those.

    Retired = has time on his hands and it's FREE!

    --
    Will Honea

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


+ Reply to Thread