sudo -s - Suse

This is a discussion on sudo -s - Suse ; I have a SuSE box that when I run sudo -s and then type in whoami it identifies me as root. However I cannot run any commands that I could not run as my basic user like useradd. If I ...

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Thread: sudo -s

  1. sudo -s

    I have a SuSE box that when I run sudo -s and then type in whoami it
    identifies me as root. However I cannot run any commands that I could not
    run as my basic user like useradd. If I run su - and type whoami again it
    says I am root and I can now run the useradd command. I have put the user
    into the wheel group and uncommented the line in the sudoers file. I have
    added a line that has ALL=(ALL) ALL in it for the user and I still have
    the issue.

    Does anyone have an idea as to what is happening?



  2. Re: sudo -s

    Andrew Madsen wrote:
    > I have a SuSE box that when I run sudo -s and then type in whoami it
    > identifies me as root. However I cannot run any commands that I could not
    > run as my basic user like useradd. If I run su - and type whoami again it
    > says I am root and I can now run the useradd command. I have put the user
    > into the wheel group and uncommented the line in the sudoers file. I have
    > added a line that has ALL=(ALL) ALL in it for the user and I still have
    > the issue.
    >
    > Does anyone have an idea as to what is happening?


    Do you get "Permission denied" errors or "command not found"? Because
    with sudo, programs are searched in the $PATH of the user, not root. To
    run useradd with sudo, you have to do:

    sudo /usr/sbin/useradd

    I usually put this at the end of my ~/.bashrc:

    export PATH=$PATH:/sbin:/usr/sbin

    so I can all programs with sudo. No, it's not a setting that lowers
    security in any way. It is totally safe.

  3. Re: sudo -s

    Andrew Madsen wrote:
    > I have a SuSE box that when I run sudo -s and then type in whoami it
    > identifies me as root. However I cannot run any commands that I could not
    > run as my basic user like useradd. If I run su - and type whoami again it
    > says I am root and I can now run the useradd command. I have put the user
    > into the wheel group and uncommented the line in the sudoers file. I have
    > added a line that has ALL=(ALL) ALL in it for the user and I still have
    > the issue.
    >
    > Does anyone have an idea as to what is happening?
    >
    >


    Try
    sudo su
    (no hyphens). Works for me, although it is functionally identical to
    su -
    or
    su - root

  4. Re: sudo -s

    Thanks for the tip. I have followed the suggestion.

    "Nikos Chantziaras" wrote in message
    news:fqs793$t5q$1@volcano1.grnet.gr...
    > Andrew Madsen wrote:
    >> I have a SuSE box that when I run sudo -s and then type in whoami it
    >> identifies me as root. However I cannot run any commands that I could not
    >> run as my basic user like useradd. If I run su - and type whoami again it
    >> says I am root and I can now run the useradd command. I have put the user
    >> into the wheel group and uncommented the line in the sudoers file. I have
    >> added a line that has ALL=(ALL) ALL in it for the user and I still
    >> have the issue.
    >>
    >> Does anyone have an idea as to what is happening?

    >
    > Do you get "Permission denied" errors or "command not found"? Because
    > with sudo, programs are searched in the $PATH of the user, not root. To
    > run useradd with sudo, you have to do:
    >
    > sudo /usr/sbin/useradd
    >
    > I usually put this at the end of my ~/.bashrc:
    >
    > export PATH=$PATH:/sbin:/usr/sbin
    >
    > so I can all programs with sudo. No, it's not a setting that lowers
    > security in any way. It is totally safe.




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