Installing old system - Suse

This is a discussion on Installing old system - Suse ; Dieter Brozio wrote: > houghi wrote: > >> Gnther Schwarz wrote: >>> No problems here at all with 256MB on virtual machines. But then these >>> are basic installations without X and a total of less than 1GB for the ...

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Thread: Installing old system

  1. Re: Installing old system

    Dieter Brozio wrote:
    > houghi wrote:
    >
    >> Gnther Schwarz wrote:
    >>> No problems here at all with 256MB on virtual machines. But then these
    >>> are basic installations without X and a total of less than 1GB for the
    >>> entire filesystem.

    >>
    >> So no KDE or GNOME. How CAN you work with that. ;-)

    >
    > ssh root@192.168.x.x from another PC works fine. For a Samba, FTP or HTTP
    > server there isn't a GUI necessary.


    Apparently the smiley did not make it clear that it wasn't completely
    serious.

    > My "family server" runs openSUSE 10.2 with 192 MB (128+64 MB) on a Pentium
    > P3 with 400 MHz. Never I would waste just only one cent to buy a new RAM
    > module. :-)


    Well, I would, but then I have a wopping 1GB. The issue I always have is
    wether I should buy a whole new PC, or just parts. I would love to buy
    an of the shelf machine, but then I do have specific demands that you
    can not find there.
    1) Dual screen is a must
    2) Extra space for the HD's I have now
    3) Easy access to everything

    Also I must ask myself if it would be better to just buy a whole new
    one, instead of the things I need upgrading.

    e.g. if I would buy and upgrade, I would have a new mobo, cpu, memory
    and probably a 3d video card. I might also go away from IDE, so some new
    HD's. If I add a new case, I have a new machine.

    However one of my screens is slowly getting much darker, so I might be
    buying either a new 1600x1200 20" or buy two 24" 1920x1200. Those can be
    had for under 500EUR each. I would then need a new card, which will add
    another 200EUR to it, I guess.


    houghi
    --
    At the source of every error which is blamed on the computer you will
    find at least two human errors, including the error of blaming it on
    the computer.

  2. Re: Installing old system

    David Bolt wrote:
    > On Tue, 4 Mar 2008, Blattus Slafaly 0/00 wrote:-
    >
    >> houghi wrote:
    >>> Blattus Slafaly 0/00 wrote:
    >>>> I'm trying to install OpenSUSE 10.3 GM on an old AMD K6-2 400mhz
    >>>> processor with 256 meg of ram.
    >>>> It goes all right up to creating repository of SR1 and fails.
    >>>> It never states that there isn't enough memory for install but is
    >>>> that possible? Tried several times. The media check completes
    >>>> without error.
    >>>> It's unable to create a repository of SR1,then aborts the installation.
    >>> It should be enough memory, but to be sure, do the text based
    >>> install.
    >>> houghi

    >> How do you get it in text mode. The text mode that comes up on a failed
    >> install does not work.

    >
    > Boot the 10.3 DVD and use the down arrow to highlight "Installation" .
    > Then, enter the following on kernel options line:
    >
    > textmode=1
    >
    > If you'd like to have a shell available before starting the
    > installation, so you can do silly little things like partition a drive
    > and create a swap partition on a system with too little memory, you can
    > add the option:
    >
    > startshell=1
    >
    > For a full list of options available, have a look here:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Regards,
    > David Bolt
    >


    I created a swap partition, didn't work. Text mode don't work. I can
    boot Damn Small Linux live but can't install, goes through the motions
    and does nothing. PCLinuxOS 2007 live just keeps rebooting after a
    partial load. Fedora 8 says the bios is too old.

    I'm junking it. Bought a new Motherboard, cpu and memory; new Sata hard
    drive , new power supply. When I get all the pieces and slap it together
    I'll see how that loads.

    --
    Blattus Slafaly ? 3 7/8

  3. Re: Installing old system

    Blattus Slafaly 0/00 wrote:
    > I'm junking it. Bought a new Motherboard, cpu and memory; new Sata hard
    > drive , new power supply. When I get all the pieces and slap it together
    > I'll see how that loads.


    Just curious, why the new power supply? And if you would have bought a
    case, you would have had a new PC, so why not a whole new PC? From what
    I have seen, complete PC's are cheaper then their parts.

    houghi
    --
    Listen do you hear them drawing near in their search for the sinners?
    Feeding on the power of our fear and the evil within us.
    Incarnation of Satan's creation of all that we dread.
    When the demons arrive those alive would be better off dead!

  4. Re: Installing old system

    houghi wrote:
    > Blattus Slafaly £ ¥ 0/00 wrote:
    >> I'm junking it. Bought a new Motherboard, cpu and memory; new Sata hard
    >> drive , new power supply. When I get all the pieces and slap it together
    >> I'll see how that loads.

    >
    > Just curious, why the new power supply? And if you would have bought a
    > case, you would have had a new PC, so why not a whole new PC? From what
    > I have seen, complete PC's are cheaper then their parts.
    >
    > houghi


    I could get a new pc for 400, I spent 200. Same old case, monitor,
    keyboard, mouse. The PS is only 250 watts ATX and 20 pins instead of 24
    pins and don't have an sata connection. The MB manual says the board
    could be unstable with only 20 pins. The new one is 450 watts.
    You're right, you don't really save much by building your own
    now-a-days. But it's fun.



    Blattus Slafaly ف ٣

  5. Re: Installing old system

    On Thu, 6 Mar 2008, Blattus Slafaly £ ¥ ‰ wrote:-

    >houghi wrote:
    >> Blattus Slafaly £ ¥ 0/00 wrote:
    >>> I'm junking it. Bought a new Motherboard, cpu and memory; new Sata
    >>>hard drive , new power supply. When I get all the pieces and slap it
    >>>together I'll see how that loads.

    >> Just curious, why the new power supply? And if you would have bought
    >>a
    >> case, you would have had a new PC, so why not a whole new PC? From what
    >> I have seen, complete PC's are cheaper then their parts.
    >> houghi

    >
    >I could get a new pc for 400, I spent 200. Same old case, monitor,
    >keyboard, mouse. The PS is only 250 watts ATX and 20 pins instead of 24
    >pins and don't have an sata connection. The MB manual says the board
    >could be unstable with only 20 pins. The new one is 450 watts.
    >You're right, you don't really save much by building your own now-a-
    >days. But it's fun.


    I always like to build my own. The last one I built was a dual-cored AMD
    system, 3GB RAM, an 80GB and 500GB drive, one iPod look-alike case, and
    cost a total of about 240GBP (310 Euros, 470 USD) was a lot of fun to
    build. It would have cost a little more but I already had the flat
    screen, USB keyboard, mouse and a DVD ROM, so that knocked about 100GBP
    off the price. I did swap the 400W power supply for a 500W one, and I
    had to get a 20-24 pin adapter, but that made little difference.

    After a couple of hours of installing and tweaking, I had it up and
    running both XP and openSUSE 10.3, and my wife's been very happy with it
    ever since. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to break her of her
    reliance on Windows, but she now spends most of her time using Linux.
    Maybe a few more months and she'll want me to remove Windows completely.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0a1
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  6. Re: Installing old system

    David Bolt wrote:
    > On Thu, 6 Mar 2008, Blattus Slafaly £ ¥ ‰ wrote:-
    >
    >> houghi wrote:
    >>> Blattus Slafaly £ ¥ 0/00 wrote:
    >>>> I'm junking it. Bought a new Motherboard, cpu and memory; new Sata
    >>>> hard drive , new power supply. When I get all the pieces and slap it
    >>>> together I'll see how that loads.
    >>> Just curious, why the new power supply? And if you would have bought
    >>> a
    >>> case, you would have had a new PC, so why not a whole new PC? From what
    >>> I have seen, complete PC's are cheaper then their parts.
    >>> houghi

    >> I could get a new pc for 400, I spent 200. Same old case, monitor,
    >> keyboard, mouse. The PS is only 250 watts ATX and 20 pins instead of 24
    >> pins and don't have an sata connection. The MB manual says the board
    >> could be unstable with only 20 pins. The new one is 450 watts.
    >> You're right, you don't really save much by building your own now-a-
    >> days. But it's fun.

    >
    > I always like to build my own. The last one I built was a dual-cored AMD
    > system, 3GB RAM, an 80GB and 500GB drive, one iPod look-alike case, and
    > cost a total of about 240GBP (310 Euros, 470 USD) was a lot of fun to
    > build. It would have cost a little more but I already had the flat
    > screen, USB keyboard, mouse and a DVD ROM, so that knocked about 100GBP
    > off the price. I did swap the 400W power supply for a 500W one, and I
    > had to get a 20-24 pin adapter, but that made little difference.
    >
    > After a couple of hours of installing and tweaking, I had it up and
    > running both XP and openSUSE 10.3, and my wife's been very happy with it
    > ever since. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to break her of her
    > reliance on Windows, but she now spends most of her time using Linux.
    > Maybe a few more months and she'll want me to remove Windows completely.
    >
    >
    > Regards,
    > David Bolt
    >


    I just got the PCChips A31G SIS761GX with an AMD Athlon M2800+ Socket
    754 (About 2.0ghz) and 1 gig of ram, could have 2 gig, all for $119.00.
    Plus a DVD dual layer burner for $27.00, PS for $14.00 and an SATA 320
    gig HD for $43.00 Good enough for now. Actually will be my fastest
    machine to date. Other 2desktops are 1.3 and 1.7ghz which are plenty
    fast. I didn't see the need for Dual core yet, Notebook has it, no
    difference noted other than some dependency problems. I have Windows XP
    Media center on the notebook only because it came with it. Only need it
    for TaxAct. Have Windows ME on a hard drive that will go into the new
    box. But Mostly run OpenSUSE 10.3 on everything 99% of the time.



    --
    Blattus Slafaly ف ٣

  7. Re: Installing old system

    Blattus Slafaly ? wrote:
    > I could get a new pc for 400, I spent 200. Same old case, monitor,
    > keyboard, mouse. The PS is only 250 watts ATX and 20 pins instead of 24
    > pins and don't have an sata connection. The MB manual says the board
    > could be unstable with only 20 pins. The new one is 450 watts.
    > You're right, you don't really save much by building your own
    > now-a-days. But it's fun.


    With a new computer, I mean just the case without the monitor. The mouse
    and keyboard that I would get would go directly in the bin. :-D

    Obviously if you need a different connection, you need a new PSU.

    houghi
    --
    Listen do you hear them drawing near in their search for the sinners?
    Feeding on the power of our fear and the evil within us.
    Incarnation of Satan's creation of all that we dread.
    When the demons arrive those alive would be better off dead!

  8. Re: Installing old system

    David Bolt wrote:
    > I always like to build my own. The last one I built was a dual-cored AMD
    > system, 3GB RAM, an 80GB and 500GB drive, one iPod look-alike case, and
    > cost a total of about 240GBP (310 Euros, 470 USD) was a lot of fun to
    > build. It would have cost a little more but I already had the flat
    > screen, USB keyboard, mouse and a DVD ROM, so that knocked about 100GBP
    > off the price. I did swap the 400W power supply for a 500W one, and I
    > had to get a 20-24 pin adapter, but that made little difference.


    I have done that too many times to find it still fun. It basicaly now is
    but the components, open the case, throw the stuff in, close the case.
    With all the unacking it will take between 15 minutes and 1 hour. If it
    doesn't fit, you are screwed.

    Also I know almost nothing about hardware, so I will most likely buy the
    wrong mobo, to start with. No idea what is importand on a mobo and what
    not. I know what I need, so I know I do not need. However when I rule
    all out what I do not need, select what I do need, I still have a huge
    choice of motherboards.

    The knowledge I had when I bought one the last time is completely
    useless. :=/

    The problem I have is if you buy half of the things you don't need and
    be left with half a PC or buy just enough what you need and be left with
    half a PC.

    > After a couple of hours of installing and tweaking, I had it up and
    > running both XP and openSUSE 10.3, and my wife's been very happy with it
    > ever since.


    Installing and tweaking will always be done, even if it would be a
    pre-installed system (perhaps even more then)

    houghi
    --
    Listen do you hear them drawing near in their search for the sinners?
    Feeding on the power of our fear and the evil within us.
    Incarnation of Satan's creation of all that we dread.
    When the demons arrive those alive would be better off dead!

  9. Re: Installing old system

    On Thu, 6 Mar 2008, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:
    >> I always like to build my own. The last one I built was a dual-cored AMD
    >> system, 3GB RAM, an 80GB and 500GB drive, one iPod look-alike case, and
    >> cost a total of about 240GBP (310 Euros, 470 USD) was a lot of fun to
    >> build. It would have cost a little more but I already had the flat
    >> screen, USB keyboard, mouse and a DVD ROM, so that knocked about 100GBP
    >> off the price. I did swap the 400W power supply for a 500W one, and I
    >> had to get a 20-24 pin adapter, but that made little difference.

    >
    >I have done that too many times to find it still fun. It basicaly now is
    >but the components, open the case, throw the stuff in, close the case.


    That's more or less the same here, although I do like to pay attention
    to where the cabling goes to try and make sure the air flow is good
    enough to prevent overheating. And despite building all my own PCs[0]
    for the last 10 or 11 years, I still find it to be fun.

    >With all the unacking it will take between 15 minutes and 1 hour.


    I usually take about 30 minutes to build a system, completely from
    scratch.

    >If it
    >doesn't fit, you are screwed.


    I've not yet had a problem where I've not been able to pack everything
    into the case. I've had it where I've had to rearrange things a bit, but
    everything goes

    >Also I know almost nothing about hardware, so I will most likely buy the
    >wrong mobo, to start with.


    I must have been very lucky then. I don't bother checking the
    motherboard specs and, with the exception of a single nforce3 based
    motherboard, everything has worked just fine. Even with that solitary
    board, the only thing that didn't work was the built-in network
    connection and downloading, building and installing the nforce drivers
    solved that.

    Even the latest board I bought, an nforce based Winfast board (6100M2M),
    bundled with an AMD 4200+ and 1GB DDR2[1] worked just fine. The built-in
    sound, graphics and network connection are all working fine, although I
    can't try the network connection at the full 1Gbps as the rest of my
    network is only 100Mbps.

    >No idea what is importand on a mobo and what
    >not. I know what I need, so I know I do not need. However when I rule
    >all out what I do not need, select what I do need, I still have a huge
    >choice of motherboards.


    True. I almost always go for the cheapest boards and, so far, have
    replaced them only because I wanted a faster system that required a new
    processor socket.

    >The knowledge I had when I bought one the last time is completely
    >useless. :=/


    Maybe. Almost all my systems are headless, but all have a KDE desktop
    running, and I use either VNC or I log in and use a shell when dealing
    with them.

    >The problem I have is if you buy half of the things you don't need and
    >be left with half a PC or buy just enough what you need and be left with
    >half a PC.


    Or you buy off the shelf and end up with more than you want because you
    didn't say to leave something out.

    >> After a couple of hours of installing and tweaking, I had it up and
    >> running both XP and openSUSE 10.3, and my wife's been very happy with it
    >> ever since.

    >
    >Installing and tweaking will always be done, even if it would be a
    >pre-installed system (perhaps even more then)


    As far as I'm concerned, it's hers to tweak, fiddle with and possibly
    break as she pleases. If she breaks it, I'll tell her how to go about
    fixing it and, needs be, show her how to fix it. However, it's her
    system and I won't be doing anything more to it unless, and until, she
    actually breaks it so badly that I have to do the repair job.


    [0] Okay, I don't include the 4 laptops I've had during that time, and I
    certainly don't think I'd call it fun trying to assemble one of those.

    [1] to which I added an extra 1GB as it was on special offer.

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0a1
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  10. Re: Installing old system

    Blattus Slafaly 0/00 wrote:
    > I'm trying to install OpenSUSE 10.3 GM on an old AMD K6-2 400mhz
    > processor with 256 meg of ram.
    > It goes all right up to creating repository of SR1 and fails.
    > It never states that there isn't enough memory for install but is that
    > possible? Tried several times. The media check completes without error.
    > It's unable to create a repository of SR1,then aborts the installation.
    >
    >
    >

    Old system gone, new system up and running. Got the last two parts
    today, slapped it together, configed the bios and wham, Windows **** the
    bed. Took the Windows drive off the boot list, loaded OpenSUSE 10.3 in
    about 20 minutes and away we go, not even a hiccup. Runs like a finely
    tuned machine. I'm really impressed with my work. haha.



    --
    Blattus Slafaly ? 3 7/8

  11. Re: Installing old system

    On Thu, 6 Mar 2008, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:


    >I think my 3.05Ghz 1GB system is good enough for another two years, so
    >who knows what will happen till then.


    Given my main system is a dual processor 1500+ MP with 1GB, and has been
    for over four years, a 3GHz system should be fine for a good while yet.
    You might want to throw in another GB or 2 of memory though. Mine
    started with 256MB and rapidly progressed to 1GB as I found it limiting
    having so little. If it wasn't for the fact that registered DDR memory
    was so hard to find, and not so cheap, I'd have doubled it already.

    >> Maybe. Almost all my systems are headless, but all have a KDE desktop
    >> running, and I use either VNC or I log in and use a shell when dealing
    >> with them.

    >
    >I used to have sevral machines. Now I just have one main and one
    >portable, which I still did not have time to get the network running.
    >:-/


    Must be some weird network card to not be easily sorted under Linux.
    That is, unless you're talking about a wireless network where I gave up
    bothering about quite some time ago. I did manage to get an RT2500
    running under 10.0, I think, but couldn't get the encryption working so
    decided it would be a good idea to not use it. Even my laptops don't use
    wireless, although I might have another go with one of them once 11.0 is
    released.

    >> Or you buy off the shelf and end up with more than you want because you
    >> didn't say to leave something out.

    >
    >Even if you ask to leave things out, I will end up with half a machine
    >that is almost ready to go with hardware that is a pity to trow away,
    >yet does not get enough on eBay.


    That's exactly how more or less all my machines started life. As I
    upgraded I kept the bits, just in case. Eventually, I ended up with just
    one or two bits short of a complete system and so bought those and up
    sprang a new box. Over time, I ended up with seven different systems,
    none of which would have been bought for very much at all now. The only
    exceptions to that are the systems that recently had the very new boards
    fitted.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0a1
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  12. Re: Installing old system

    David Bolt wrote:
    > for over four years, a 3GHz system should be fine for a good while yet.
    > You might want to throw in another GB or 2 of memory though. Mine
    > started with 256MB and rapidly progressed to 1GB as I found it limiting
    > having so little. If it wasn't for the fact that registered DDR memory
    > was so hard to find, and not so cheap, I'd have doubled it already.


    I think my mobo has a limit of 2GB. Also I never have any issues with
    memory. The only limit I see is sometimes the CPU load being too high.
    Not often enough to worry about.

    I do not use bloatware, like KDE or GNOME. They are evil. ;-)

    >>I used to have sevral machines. Now I just have one main and one
    >>portable, which I still did not have time to get the network running.
    >>:-/

    >
    > Must be some weird network card to not be easily sorted under Linux.


    Yep. And as it is a portable, it is not easy to put in a new one. I have
    a PCMCIA card, so I thought: if it the one in there doesn't work, I just
    plug in the old one I have. Assholes have changed the standards, so I
    can not plug in the old one.

    > That is, unless you're talking about a wireless network where I gave up
    > bothering about quite some time ago. I did manage to get an RT2500
    > running under 10.0, I think, but couldn't get the encryption working so
    > decided it would be a good idea to not use it. Even my laptops don't use
    > wireless, although I might have another go with one of them once 11.0 is
    > released.


    I did install the last Alpha and there at least it saw some things. So
    perhaps together with what people found as a solution on Ubuntu, I might
    be able to solve it.

    With 10.3 it did not even see the cards, unless pointed out.

    > That's exactly how more or less all my machines started life. As I
    > upgraded I kept the bits, just in case. Eventually, I ended up with just
    > one or two bits short of a complete system and so bought those and up
    > sprang a new box. Over time, I ended up with seven different systems,
    > none of which would have been bought for very much at all now. The only
    > exceptions to that are the systems that recently had the very new boards
    > fitted.


    That is the reason I bought an IDE card, because the real things I had
    worth using were the HD's. I do not have any use for more then one
    machine and one portable.

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  13. Re: Installing old system

    On Fri, 7 Mar 2008, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:
    >> for over four years, a 3GHz system should be fine for a good while yet.
    >> You might want to throw in another GB or 2 of memory though. Mine
    >> started with 256MB and rapidly progressed to 1GB as I found it limiting
    >> having so little. If it wasn't for the fact that registered DDR memory
    >> was so hard to find, and not so cheap, I'd have doubled it already.

    >
    >I think my mobo has a limit of 2GB. Also I never have any issues with
    >memory.


    It can't handle 2GB sticks? That's not so good. Having said that, while
    I have 4 slots available, my latest boards only support 4GB. I'm hoping
    that's just a BIOS issue that's going to be fixed. It would be quite
    nice to be able to replace the 1GB sticks with 2GB or 4GB sticks in the
    future. As it's not likely to happen for some time yet, I'm not too
    worried about it right now.

    >The only limit I see is sometimes the CPU load being too high.
    >Not often enough to worry about.


    I run all my systems at 100% load per core and don't worry about it. The
    dnetc client runs with a niceness of 19, so it barely interferes with
    the other processes.

    The only problems I have with my systems are almost all related to
    memory, or rather lack of it. One of my systems is next on the list for
    additional memory as it's presently using 900MB of swap, and only has
    512MB of RAM.

    >I do not use bloatware, like KDE or GNOME. They are evil. ;-)


    Depending on how much KDE4 changes, and whether it becomes as
    configurable as KDE3, I might be inclined to at least partially agree
    with that statement.

    >> Must be some weird network card to not be easily sorted under Linux.

    >
    >Yep. And as it is a portable, it is not easy to put in a new one.


    Does it show up when using "lspci" ? Is it an unknown device, or is it
    identified? Have you seen if there's a driver available from the laptop
    manufacturers web site?

    >I have
    >a PCMCIA card, so I thought: if it the one in there doesn't work, I just
    >plug in the old one I have. Assholes have changed the standards, so I
    >can not plug in the old one.


    Your laptop has a type I slot and the card is a type II?

    >I did install the last Alpha and there at least it saw some things. So
    >perhaps together with what people found as a solution on Ubuntu, I might
    >be able to solve it.


    Good.

    >With 10.3 it did not even see the cards, unless pointed out.


    Not so good.

    >That is the reason I bought an IDE card, because the real things I had
    >worth using were the HD's.


    That's true, the HD's are the most important parts of my systems as
    well.

    >I do not have any use for more then one
    >machine and one portable.


    I do. All my systems have a function, even if it's just to act as a
    backup/drop-in replacement for one of my other systems. And now, I've
    just been given another system so now I can start testing 11.0 on real
    hardware instead of a virtual machine. All I need to do now is find the
    space to set it up :-/


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0a1
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  14. Re: Installing old system

    David Bolt wrote:
    > It can't handle 2GB sticks? That's not so good.


    As I do have enough, I don't bother to look it up.

    >>The only limit I see is sometimes the CPU load being too high.
    >>Not often enough to worry about.

    >
    > I run all my systems at 100% load per core and don't worry about it. The
    > dnetc client runs with a niceness of 19, so it barely interferes with
    > the other processes.


    I have several scripts running and they do influence the smootness of
    the machine sometimes. Not often enough to buy a new one.

    >>I do not use bloatware, like KDE or GNOME. They are evil. ;-)

    >
    > Depending on how much KDE4 changes, and whether it becomes as
    > configurable as KDE3, I might be inclined to at least partially agree
    > with that statement.


    Even if they change for the better 112%, they still would be evil. :-D

    > Does it show up when using "lspci" ?


    No idea.

    > Is it an unknown device, or is it identified?


    Identiefied in Alpha, nothing in 10.3. Not sure if the identification is
    correct,

    > Have you seen if there's a driver available from the laptop
    > manufacturers web site?


    from Fujutsu Siemens? Shirley, you must be joking.

    >>I have
    >>a PCMCIA card, so I thought: if it the one in there doesn't work, I just
    >>plug in the old one I have. Assholes have changed the standards, so I
    >>can not plug in the old one.

    >
    > Your laptop has a type I slot and the card is a type II?


    No idea what type is what. I have a card and my laptop only accepts the
    same size with a corner cust out.

    >>I did install the last Alpha and there at least it saw some things. So
    >>perhaps together with what people found as a solution on Ubuntu, I might
    >>be able to solve it.

    >
    > Good.


    .... when I find time.

    >>That is the reason I bought an IDE card, because the real things I had
    >>worth using were the HD's.

    >
    > That's true, the HD's are the most important parts of my systems as
    > well.


    And they can be kept untill they burn. I still use my 10 and 40GB HD's

    >>I do not have any use for more then one
    >>machine and one portable.

    >
    > I do. All my systems have a function, even if it's just to act as a
    > backup/drop-in replacement for one of my other systems. And now, I've
    > just been given another system so now I can start testing 11.0 on real
    > hardware instead of a virtual machine. All I need to do now is find the
    > space to set it up :-/


    My PC's also had a function, but all those functions can be run on one
    system. A freind of mine has about 8 or 10 machines and he hardly does
    anything with them. One is a firewall. One will become a webserver, one
    a mailsercer, one a ...

    What I used to have is a KVM so I could turn from one systen to the
    next. After that I bought my dueal head videao card and ran things over
    NFS. Next I got rid of the extra machines.

    Where my friend has 8 machines and one screen, I rather have 1 machine
    and 8 screens. :-D

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  15. Re: Installing old system

    On Fri, 7 Mar 2008, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:
    >> It can't handle 2GB sticks? That's not so good.

    >
    >As I do have enough, I don't bother to look it up.


    That's as good a reason as any.

    >> I run all my systems at 100% load per core and don't worry about it. The
    >> dnetc client runs with a niceness of 19, so it barely interferes with
    >> the other processes.

    >
    >I have several scripts running and they do influence the smootness of
    >the machine sometimes. Not often enough to buy a new one.


    Not tried seeing which ones cause the ripples?

    >> Depending on how much KDE4 changes, and whether it becomes as
    >> configurable as KDE3, I might be inclined to at least partially agree
    >> with that statement.

    >
    >Even if they change for the better 112%, they still would be evil. :-D


    Evil would be Gnome. KDE is only part evil

    >> Is it an unknown device, or is it identified?

    >
    >Identiefied in Alpha, nothing in 10.3. Not sure if the identification is
    >correct,


    Does is match other distros where it is identified?

    >> Have you seen if there's a driver available from the laptop
    >> manufacturers web site?

    >
    >from Fujutsu Siemens? Shirley, you must be joking.


    Quite possibly. And don't call me Shirley :-)

    >>>I have
    >>>a PCMCIA card, so I thought: if it the one in there doesn't work, I just
    >>>plug in the old one I have. Assholes have changed the standards, so I
    >>>can not plug in the old one.

    >>
    >> Your laptop has a type I slot and the card is a type II?

    >
    >No idea what type is what. I have a card and my laptop only accepts the
    >same size with a corner cust out.


    Sounds like it's a 32bit card and the laptop doesn't support anything
    other than 16bit cards. I met that with an old 486 laptop.

    >>>I did install the last Alpha and there at least it saw some things. So
    >>>perhaps together with what people found as a solution on Ubuntu, I might
    >>>be able to solve it.

    >>
    >> Good.

    >
    >... when I find time.


    I keep saying that as well. Far too often for my liking :-|

    >>>That is the reason I bought an IDE card, because the real things I had
    >>>worth using were the HD's.

    >>
    >> That's true, the HD's are the most important parts of my systems as
    >> well.

    >
    >And they can be kept untill they burn. I still use my 10 and 40GB HD's


    Most of mine are using 80GB, with a few larger ones scattered amongst
    them. I do have a couple of systems with smaller drives, one of which
    still has a 6.4GB and a 10GB drive. It does also have a 160GB drive in
    there as well, but that was a fairly recent addition.

    >> I do. All my systems have a function, even if it's just to act as a
    >> backup/drop-in replacement for one of my other systems. And now, I've
    >> just been given another system so now I can start testing 11.0 on real
    >> hardware instead of a virtual machine. All I need to do now is find the
    >> space to set it up :-/

    >
    >My PC's also had a function, but all those functions can be run on one
    >system. A freind of mine has about 8 or 10 machines and he hardly does
    >anything with them. One is a firewall. One will become a webserver, one
    >a mailsercer, one a ...


    Sounds a little like someone I know, although I no longer have a
    separate firewall. That job is now performed by my router. I do have a
    separate mail server, web server, database server, and the systems that
    aren't fulfilling those roles can act as backups at almost a moments
    notice. Oh, and all my systems do get used for package building for the
    various versions of (open)SUSE that they run.

    >What I used to have is a KVM so I could turn from one systen to the
    >next. After that I bought my dueal head videao card and ran things over
    >NFS.


    I'm not at that sort of stage quite yet, although I do share a large
    number of their drives over NFS. Autofs does come in quite useful for
    that as I don't have to worry about which system has to boot before
    which other system.

    >Next I got rid of the extra machines.


    Not likely to happen here. My wife collects ornaments, I collect PCs.

    >Where my friend has 8 machines and one screen, I rather have 1 machine
    >and 8 screens. :-D


    So you're happy to just look a little like NASA/ESA launch control,
    whereas your friend is on his way to being able to run the NASA/ESA
    launch control? :-)


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0a1
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  16. Re: Installing old system

    David Bolt wrote:
    >>I have several scripts running and they do influence the smootness of
    >>the machine sometimes. Not often enough to buy a new one.

    >
    > Not tried seeing which ones cause the ripples?


    no.

    >>Even if they change for the better 112%, they still would be evil. :-D

    >
    > Evil would be Gnome. KDE is only part evil


    Yes, but twice as much, so it evens out.

    >>Identiefied in Alpha, nothing in 10.3. Not sure if the identification is
    >>correct,

    >
    > Does is match other distros where it is identified?


    No idea as I am not even shure what it should identify as.

    >>from Fujutsu Siemens? Shirley, you must be joking.

    >
    > Quite possibly. And don't call me Shirley :-)


    If you are not Shirley, you must be Joking. Strage name.

    > Sounds like it's a 32bit card and the laptop doesn't support anything
    > other than 16bit cards. I met that with an old 486 laptop.


    I doubt that very much as the old 486 would accept it.

    > Sounds a little like someone I know, although I no longer have a
    > separate firewall. That job is now performed by my router. I do have a
    > separate mail server, web server, database server, and the systems that
    > aren't fulfilling those roles can act as backups at almost a moments
    > notice. Oh, and all my systems do get used for package building for the
    > various versions of (open)SUSE that they run.


    I have a company that builds the packages for me.

    >>Where my friend has 8 machines and one screen, I rather have 1 machine
    >>and 8 screens. :-D

    >
    > So you're happy to just look a little like NASA/ESA launch control,
    > whereas your friend is on his way to being able to run the NASA/ESA
    > launch control? :-)


    He runs Windows, exept for the firewall. So perhaps he needs that many
    machines to be able to do anything. :-D

    He uses two or three machines running Excel to analyse and predict the
    stockmarket. I am sure that if he re-wrote them for perl or even bash,
    he would be a LOT faster.

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  17. Re: Installing old system

    On Fri, 7 Mar 2008, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:


    >>>Even if they change for the better 112%, they still would be evil. :-D

    >>
    >> Evil would be Gnome. KDE is only part evil

    >
    >Yes, but twice as much, so it evens out.


    :-)

    >>>Identiefied in Alpha, nothing in 10.3. Not sure if the identification is
    >>>correct,

    >>
    >> Does is match other distros where it is identified?

    >
    >No idea as I am not even shure what it should identify as.


    That's certainly not a good start.

    >>>from Fujutsu Siemens? Shirley, you must be joking.

    >>
    >> Quite possibly. And don't call me Shirley :-)

    >
    >If you are not Shirley, you must be Joking. Strage name.


    It's better than some of the names I've been called.

    >> Sounds like it's a 32bit card and the laptop doesn't support anything
    >> other than 16bit cards. I met that with an old 486 laptop.

    >
    >I doubt that very much as the old 486 would accept it.


    Nope. Didn't like 32bit cards, even after fiddling with it so it would
    fit in the slot. The card I used was a network card, as the laptop
    didn't have one, and it wasn't recognised when inserted. By using
    another 16bit card I was able to connect it up. However, that was a long
    time ago, and that system has long since been disposed of.

    >> Sounds a little like someone I know, although I no longer have a
    >> separate firewall. That job is now performed by my router. I do have a
    >> separate mail server, web server, database server, and the systems that
    >> aren't fulfilling those roles can act as backups at almost a moments
    >> notice. Oh, and all my systems do get used for package building for the
    >> various versions of (open)SUSE that they run.

    >
    >I have a company that builds the packages for me.


    So do I, but I still build some that they legally can't build.

    >>>Where my friend has 8 machines and one screen, I rather have 1 machine
    >>>and 8 screens. :-D

    >>
    >> So you're happy to just look a little like NASA/ESA launch control,
    >> whereas your friend is on his way to being able to run the NASA/ESA
    >> launch control? :-)

    >
    >He runs Windows, exept for the firewall. So perhaps he needs that many
    >machines to be able to do anything. :-D


    Probably. I still run Windows, but do almost all of my work on my
    various Linux systems. Not entirely sure how long I'm going to be using
    this arrangement though. I've been very seriously thinking about running
    everything under Linux, and then using a virtual machine for the Windows
    stuff I still use. Just haven't quite gotten around to actually doing
    it.

    >He uses two or three machines running Excel to analyse and predict the
    >stockmarket.


    If it's part of the latest Office, I'm surprised he's not running it on
    more than three systems just to keep up. Then again, why hasn't he
    migrated across to Open Office. It may be quite a resource hog, but it's
    still going to be less than Excel. Unless he's using a large number of
    VB macros, the OO spreadsheet should be capable of doing the same job.

    >I am sure that if he re-wrote them for perl or even bash,
    >he would be a LOT faster.


    Possibly. All depends on the desired level of eye candy he gets Excel to
    produce, as to whether it would be worth it though.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0a1
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  18. Re: Installing old system

    houghi wrote:
    >>> Even if they change for the better 112%, they still would be evil. :-D

    >> Evil would be Gnome. KDE is only part evil

    >
    > Yes, but twice as much, so it evens out.


    And let's not forget that Novell is the biggest evil of all around here.
    Sometimes I wonder why you're still here

  19. Re: Installing old system

    Nikos Chantziaras wrote:
    > houghi wrote:
    >>>> Even if they change for the better 112%, they still would be evil. :-D
    >>> Evil would be Gnome. KDE is only part evil

    >>
    >> Yes, but twice as much, so it evens out.

    >
    > And let's not forget that Novell is the biggest evil of all around here.
    > Sometimes I wonder why you're still here


    Yeah. The basterds made YaST GPL. They opend up SUSE. They took away the
    6 weeks time difference between download and boxed version.They put the build
    service, which they use to make SLES and SLED available for the public.
    They are working on a way that you can make your own distribution (like
    CentOS) very easy and that last they are doing willingly and on pupose.
    They listen to what people want and then implement it.

    They are really evil.

    houghi
    --
    ________________________ Open your eyes, open your mind
    | proud like a god don't pretend to be blind
    | trapped in yourself, break out instead
    http://openSUSE.org | beat the machine that works in your head

  20. Re: Installing old system

    houghi wrote:
    > Nikos Chantziaras wrote:
    >> houghi wrote:
    >>>>> Even if they change for the better 112%, they still would be evil. :-D
    >>>> Evil would be Gnome. KDE is only part evil
    >>> Yes, but twice as much, so it evens out.

    >> And let's not forget that Novell is the biggest evil of all around here.
    >> Sometimes I wonder why you're still here

    >
    > Yeah. The basterds made YaST GPL. They opend up SUSE. They took away the
    > 6 weeks time difference between download and boxed version.They put the build
    > service, which they use to make SLES and SLED available for the public.
    > They are working on a way that you can make your own distribution (like
    > CentOS) very easy and that last they are doing willingly and on pupose.
    > They listen to what people want and then implement it.


    They put their signature in Microsoft papers (in a totally transparent
    way, as is usual with anyone who supports the GNU GPL. Oops, *not!*)

    Also, they refer to Microsoft as a "partner":
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEMUZuONtzo

    Of course I could be wrong. But well, those things make me think Novell
    is wrong. Now please go ahead and tell me why you think Gnome and KDE
    are "evil."

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