root password - Suse

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  1. root password

    is there anyway I can change my root password or other password or view them
    all please only 5here is one that I keep entering incorrectly as this pc was
    dual booted for me and all except 1 password is not with me .



  2. Re: root password

    On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 00:48:17 GMT, "PWB" wrote:

    >is there anyway I can change my root password or other password or view them
    >all please only 5here is one that I keep entering incorrectly as this pc was
    >dual booted for me and all except 1 password is not with me .
    >

    You cannot view the passwords as there is a one-way hash involved.

    Changing the root password is easy if you have access to the machine,
    many web resources, try google...

    Grant.
    --
    http://bugsplatter.mine.nu/

  3. Re: root password

    PWB wrote:
    > is there anyway I can change my root password or other password


    Yes, passwd

    > or view them all please


    No

    > only 5here is one that I keep entering incorrectly as this pc was
    > dual booted for me and all except 1 password is not with me .


    Is that the root password? Also please use a . to tell us where a
    sentence stops and a new one starts. Makes it much easier to read.

    houghi
    --
    > Knock-knock.
    > Who's there?
    > Under the Patriot Act, we don't have to tell you that.


  4. Re: root password


    "houghi" wrote in message
    news:slrnfric48.dn1.houghi@penne.houghi...
    > PWB wrote:
    >> is there anyway I can change my root password or other password

    >
    > Yes, passwd
    >
    >> or view them all please

    >
    > No
    >
    >> only 5here is one that I keep entering incorrectly as this pc was
    >> dual booted for me and all except 1 password is not with me .

    >
    > Is that the root password? Also please use a . to tell us where a
    > sentence stops and a new one starts. Makes it much easier to read.
    >
    > houghi


    No. Its not the root one or the ordinary password that i've been given. I
    cant remember which I keep getting asked one and when I put one of those in
    it rejects it.













    > --
    >> Knock-knock.
    >> Who's there?
    >> Under the Patriot Act, we don't have to tell you that.




  5. Re: root password

    PWB wrote:
    > No. Its not the root one or the ordinary password that i've been given. I
    > cant remember which I keep getting asked one and when I put one of those in
    > it rejects it.


    Easy. As root: `passwd user`

    houghi
    --
    > Knock-knock.
    > Who's there?
    > Under the Patriot Act, we don't have to tell you that.


  6. Re: root password

    "PWB" writes:


    >"houghi" wrote in message
    >news:slrnfric48.dn1.houghi@penne.houghi...
    >> PWB wrote:
    >>> is there anyway I can change my root password or other password

    >>
    >> Yes, passwd
    >>
    >>> or view them all please

    >>
    >> No
    >>
    >>> only 5here is one that I keep entering incorrectly as this pc was
    >>> dual booted for me and all except 1 password is not with me .

    >>
    >> Is that the root password? Also please use a . to tell us where a
    >> sentence stops and a new one starts. Makes it much easier to read.
    >>
    >> houghi


    >No. Its not the root one or the ordinary password that i've been given. I
    >cant remember which I keep getting asked one and when I put one of those in
    >it rejects it.


    Well I guess you had better go back and ask for the password again.

    IF you have the root password, you can reassign any user's password
    passwd username
    as root will allow you to enter a new password for that user.














    >> --
    >>> Knock-knock.
    >>> Who's there?
    >>> Under the Patriot Act, we don't have to tell you that.




  7. Re: root password


    "Unruh" wrote in message
    news:0ynuj.27508$FO1.15204@edtnps82...
    > "PWB" writes:
    >
    >
    >>"houghi" wrote in message
    >>news:slrnfric48.dn1.houghi@penne.houghi...
    >>> PWB wrote:
    >>>> is there anyway I can change my root password or other password
    >>>
    >>> Yes, passwd
    >>>
    >>>> or view them all please
    >>>
    >>> No
    >>>
    >>>> only 5here is one that I keep entering incorrectly as this pc was
    >>>> dual booted for me and all except 1 password is not with me .
    >>>
    >>> Is that the root password? Also please use a . to tell us where a
    >>> sentence stops and a new one starts. Makes it much easier to read.
    >>>
    >>> houghi

    >
    >>No. Its not the root one or the ordinary password that i've been given. I
    >>cant remember which I keep getting asked one and when I put one of those
    >>in
    >>it rejects it.

    >
    > Well I guess you had better go back and ask for the password again.
    >
    > IF you have the root password, you can reassign any user's password
    > passwd username
    > as root will allow you to enter a new password for that user.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>> --
    >>>> Knock-knock.
    >>>> Who's there?
    >>>> Under the Patriot Act, we don't have to tell you that.

    >
    >the ndow that is coming up is one that says, ' The application 'kontact'
    >has requested to open the wallet 'kdewallet' please enter the password for
    >the other shown below' but i have entered all the passwords none seem to
    >work. its to perform updates in SUSE.




  8. Re: root password

    houghi wrote:
    > PWB wrote:
    >> No. Its not the root one or the ordinary password that i've been given. I
    >> cant remember which I keep getting asked one and when I put one of those in
    >> it rejects it.

    >
    > Easy. As root: `passwd user`


    I got the impression that he doesn't know the root password and he
    wants to change it.

    I think there's a way to change it by booting to single-user mode,
    although I don't remember the details right now.

    Btw, how can you forbid booting to single-user mode? Assume that the
    computer can be directly accessed by untrusted people and you don't want
    them to mess up with it. (Of course it can never be a 100% safe form of
    security, but in conjunction with disallowing booting from a CD and a
    bios password it's at least a slowdown.)

  9. Re: root password

    Juha Nieminen wrote:
    > houghi wrote:
    >> PWB wrote:
    >>> No. Its not the root one or the ordinary password that i've been given. I
    >>> cant remember which I keep getting asked one and when I put one of those in
    >>> it rejects it.

    >>
    >> Easy. As root: `passwd user`

    >
    > I got the impression that he doesn't know the root password and he
    > wants to change it.


    Well, he says it's not the root, so then I asume it is not the root.

    > I think there's a way to change it by booting to single-user mode,
    > although I don't remember the details right now.


    Yes. Google will tell you how.

    > Btw, how can you forbid booting to single-user mode?


    You can't and don't want to. Basicaly somebody who has physical access
    to the PC can do as he pleases.

    > Assume that the computer can be directly accessed by untrusted people
    > and you don't want them to mess up with it. (Of course it can never be
    > a 100% safe form of security, but in conjunction with disallowing
    > booting from a CD and a bios password it's at least a slowdown.)


    Put a password on grub.
    http://web.mit.edu/rhel-doc/4/RH-DOC...-boot-sec.html

    yet remember that people who have physical access will be able to break
    in most of the time. If security is a high priority, you need to look at
    physical access and how to block that. e.g. only a touch screen or touch
    screen and keyboard. Obviously diskless workstations or working over KVM
    or a comination of all.

    houghi
    --
    I do not want life insurance.
    I want all people to be genuinely grieving when I die.

    houghi

  10. Re: root password

    Juha Nieminen writes:

    >houghi wrote:
    >> PWB wrote:
    >>> No. Its not the root one or the ordinary password that i've been given. I
    >>> cant remember which I keep getting asked one and when I put one of those in
    >>> it rejects it.

    >>
    >> Easy. As root: `passwd user`


    > I got the impression that he doesn't know the root password and he
    >wants to change it.


    > I think there's a way to change it by booting to single-user mode,
    >although I don't remember the details right now.


    > Btw, how can you forbid booting to single-user mode? Assume that the
    >computer can be directly accessed by untrusted people and you don't want
    >them to mess up with it. (Of course it can never be a 100% safe form of
    >security, but in conjunction with disallowing booting from a CD and a
    >bios password it's at least a slowdown.)


    If the person has physical control you cannot stop him getting into the
    machine. You could encrypt everything on the machine.
    He can alaways remove the hard disk and install it onto another machine and
    change /etc/shadow if it is not encryptied.


  11. Re: root password

    Unruh wrote:
    > If the person has physical control you cannot stop him getting into the
    > machine. You could encrypt everything on the machine.
    > He can alaways remove the hard disk and install it onto another machine and
    > change /etc/shadow if it is not encryptied.


    I know that, but I still think that making the breaking as hard as
    possible is still better than eg. just auto-booting to the root account
    without any password. (After all, one could argue that "since anyone who
    has direct access to the computer can break in, why have user accounts
    and passwords at all? Just boot always to the root account without a
    password.")

    If, for example, there's a public computer somewhere, where only the
    monitor, keyboard and mouse are accessible, not being able to boot to
    single user mode can be quite an effective deterrent.

  12. Re: root password

    Juha Nieminen wrote:
    >Unruh wrote:
    >> If the person has physical control you cannot stop him getting into the
    >> machine. You could encrypt everything on the machine.
    >> He can alaways remove the hard disk and install it onto another machine and
    >> change /etc/shadow if it is not encryptied.


    > I know that, but I still think that making the breaking as hard as
    >possible is still better than eg. just auto-booting to the root account
    >without any password. (After all, one could argue that "since anyone who
    >has direct access to the computer can break in, why have user accounts
    >and passwords at all? Just boot always to the root account without a
    >password.")


    > If, for example, there's a public computer somewhere, where only the
    >monitor, keyboard and mouse are accessible, not being able to boot to
    >single user mode can be quite an effective deterrent.


    That's not quite the same thing. Give me physical access to
    your hardware and I will take it over in very little time.

    No magic is needed. You can even do it with a SuSE live CD.

    The point to all this is that one needs security, but not *more*
    security than the situation allows. More security then becomes
    silly and often expensive overkill.

    --
    --- Paul J. Gans

  13. Re: root password

    Paul J Gans wrote:
    > That's not quite the same thing. Give me physical access to
    > your hardware and I will take it over in very little time.


    That is unless it is encrypted. (I asume you are not talking about just
    formatting the drive, but getting access to the data)

    > No magic is needed. You can even do it with a SuSE live CD.


    Unless there is no CD player or boot from that is locked.

    > The point to all this is that one needs security, but not *more*
    > security than the situation allows. More security then becomes
    > silly and often expensive overkill.


    yes, therefore it is also silly to say that something won't work. You
    can have physical access to a PC, yet you won't be able to open it, get
    the HD out, do your things, put it back in and all this unnoticed.

    Obviously you could steal the whole PC, but that is also something that
    will not get unnoticed.

    Also many PC's can be locked down physicaly, which will make it even
    harder to steal and/or open. That kind of security will be enough for
    most public PC's.

    If you have a very public PC, an even better way would perhaps be to
    have a kiosk. Or no PC at all, but a thin client. No HD. No nothing.
    Just add a touchscreen to it and run then just your (web) application.

    houghi
    --
    Let's not be too tough on our own ignorance. It's the thing that makes
    America great. If America weren't incomparably ignorant, how could we
    have tolerated the last eight years? -- Frank Zappa, in 1988

  14. Re: root password

    Check this out http://www.persianadmins.com/swf/ope...s-recovery.htm

    Bob
    "PWB" wrote in message
    news:lB4uj.1055$ab5.604@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
    > is there anyway I can change my root password or other password or view
    > them all please only 5here is one that I keep entering incorrectly as this
    > pc was dual booted for me and all except 1 password is not with me .
    >




  15. Re: root password

    "bob" writes:

    >Check this out http://www.persianadmins.com/swf/ope...s-recovery.htm


    >Bob
    >"PWB" wrote in message
    >news:lB4uj.1055$ab5.604@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
    >> is there anyway I can change my root password or other password or view
    >> them all please only 5here is one that I keep entering incorrectly as this
    >> pc was dual booted for me and all except 1 password is not with me .
    >>


    No you cannot view them. They are hashed and there is no known way of
    reversing the hash except trying all possible passwords and see which one
    fits. Since that is a number of the order of 10^40 passwords, that is a bit
    difficult to do.

    You can change it. Log on as root and run
    passwd

    If you want to change a users password, either log in as that user and run
    passwd (it will ask for the old password) or as root do
    password username
    and change the user's password

    If you have to change the root password without knowing it, there are two
    ways-- remove the disk from the computer, install it on another computer,
    mount the appropriate partition and use passwd -f filename
    or
    boot single user and hope it is not set up to demand a password for root
    for single user bootup. If not then you can remount the / partion
    read-write and use passwd to change root's password.




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