Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a really badidea? - Suse

This is a discussion on Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a really badidea? - Suse ; Do I understand correctly that one version of Suse (in my case 10.2) uses one version of the kernel, period, and it will never be upgraded to a newer kernel (except for minor security patches)? In other words, Suse 10.2 ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a really badidea?

  1. Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a really badidea?

    Do I understand correctly that one version of Suse (in my case 10.2)
    uses one version of the kernel, period, and it will never be upgraded to
    a newer kernel (except for minor security patches)? In other words, Suse
    10.2 will always have a 2.6.18 kernel and it will never be upgraded to
    anything newer, and that if I want a newer kernel I'll have to upgrade
    to Suse 10.3 (or 11, or whatever)?

    What would happen if I manually upgraded the kernel to 2.6.22.x? Would
    it badly break something? Would automated kernel updates stop working
    (iow. requiring me to start upgrading the kernel manually)?

    OTOH, I could just upgrade the whole system to Suse 10.3... Is that
    recommended, or is it more like "if it works, don't fix it"?

    Btw, is this also so for gcc? Suse 10.2 has gcc 4.1.2, and it will
    never be upgraded to anything newer? What happens if I manually upgrade
    it? Would it break something?

  2. Re: Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a really bad idea?

    Juha Nieminen wrote:

    > Do I understand correctly that one version of Suse (in my case 10.2)
    > uses one version of the kernel, period, and it will never be upgraded to
    > a newer kernel (except for minor security patches)? In other words, Suse
    > 10.2 will always have a 2.6.18 kernel and it will never be upgraded to
    > anything newer, and that if I want a newer kernel I'll have to upgrade
    > to Suse 10.3 (or 11, or whatever)?
    >
    > What would happen if I manually upgraded the kernel to 2.6.22.x? Would
    > it badly break something? Would automated kernel updates stop working
    > (iow. requiring me to start upgrading the kernel manually)?
    >
    > OTOH, I could just upgrade the whole system to Suse 10.3... Is that
    > recommended, or is it more like "if it works, don't fix it"?
    >
    > Btw, is this also so for gcc? Suse 10.2 has gcc 4.1.2, and it will
    > never be upgraded to anything newer? What happens if I manually upgrade
    > it? Would it break something?


    I'm quite certain that Houghi would/will say that "If it aint' broken don't
    fix it". Just use whatever is the newest version that SuSE provides and
    stick with that. Unless you MUST do so you shouldn't upgrade to a version
    other than the ones they provide as this (manual upgrade)often will result
    in hours of excruciating pain....(what some of us might think of as...a
    challenge). Leave well enough alone.

    Of course when someone points out a security issue as was just done
    yesterday you SHOULD either upgrade your kernel OR apply a patch...


    P.S. There are certain circumstances where one might need to upgrade a
    kernel to enable a newer version of a software application to run but this
    is a special case. Also, a hardware change could necessitate this as well.

    As for upgrading to a newer version of your OS that is always up to you when
    it is a good time to Upgrade.

  3. Re: Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a reallybad idea?

    Juha Nieminen wrote:
    > Do I understand correctly that one version of Suse (in my case 10.2)
    > uses one version of the kernel, period, and it will never be upgraded to
    > a newer kernel (except for minor security patches)? In other words, Suse
    > 10.2 will always have a 2.6.18 kernel and it will never be upgraded to
    > anything newer, and that if I want a newer kernel I'll have to upgrade
    > to Suse 10.3 (or 11, or whatever)?


    That's correct.


    > What would happen if I manually upgraded the kernel to 2.6.22.x? Would
    > it badly break something?


    There's a slight possibility that something might break. I used to have
    the latest, most l33t kernel on my 10.2. It ran without flaws.

    Btw, why not simply try it. If you see that something stops working for
    you, simply revert back to the old kernel.


    > Would automated kernel updates stop working
    > (iow. requiring me to start upgrading the kernel manually)?


    Yes, you would be required to check for new versions/patches of the
    latest kernel manually by looking for updates in the openSUSE kernel
    repository every now and then. Yast won't offer automatic updates to
    anything that is not part of the standard distribution.


    > OTOH, I could just upgrade the whole system to Suse 10.3... Is that
    > recommended, or is it more like "if it works, don't fix it"?


    I always like to use the latest available software, for no particular
    reason other than it's "new and shiny".


    > Btw, is this also so for gcc? Suse 10.2 has gcc 4.1.2, and it will
    > never be upgraded to anything newer? What happens if I manually upgrade
    > it? Would it break something?


    As with the kernel update, no one can guarantee you that nothing will
    break. The GCC repository for 10.2
    (http://download.opensuse.org/reposit.../openSUSE_10.2)
    contains GCC 4.2.

    Btw, you can find more repos with newer software versions by simply
    browsing around in http://download.opensuse.org/repositories The URL to
    use in the Yast repositories module is the one which contains a *.repo file.


    If you really want the newest available package versions, the most
    practical approach is to install 10.3. Personally, I create backups of
    the files I want to keep on another hard drive, install the newer
    distribution from scratch and then restore the files from the backup.
    People have been successful with installing 10.3 over 10.2, but I don't
    trust the result. I prefer clean, new install.

  4. Re: Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a really bad idea?

    On Tue, 12 Feb 2008, Nikos Chantziaras wrote:-

    >Juha Nieminen wrote:


    >> What would happen if I manually upgraded the kernel to 2.6.22.x? Would
    >> it badly break something?

    >
    >There's a slight possibility that something might break. I used to
    >have the latest, most l33t kernel on my 10.2. It ran without flaws.
    >
    >Btw, why not simply try it. If you see that something stops working
    >for you, simply revert back to the old kernel.


    And, if you're really sensible, you'll enable the fallback in the boot
    loader configuration so that if the system doesn't boot with the new
    kernel, it will auto-start with the old one.

    >> Would automated kernel updates stop working
    >> (iow. requiring me to start upgrading the kernel manually)?

    >
    >Yes, you would be required to check for new versions/patches of the
    >latest kernel manually by looking for updates in the openSUSE kernel
    >repository every now and then. Yast won't offer automatic updates to
    >anything that is not part of the standard distribution.


    Erm, not quite true. YaST won't offer updates for packages that don't
    have a patch file for them. However, if someone takes the time and
    effort to create the patch files[0], YOU will display any updates.



    >If you really want the newest available package versions, the most
    >practical approach is to install 10.3. Personally, I create backups of
    >the files I want to keep on another hard drive, install the newer
    >distribution from scratch and then restore the files from the backup.
    >People have been successful with installing 10.3 over 10.2, but I don't
    >trust the result. I prefer clean, new install.


    Going from 10.2 to 10.3 is the only supported version upgrade. That
    hasn't stopped others[1] from going from 10.1, 10.0, or even 9.3 to 10.3
    and having it work properly afterwards. However, as you say, a fresh
    install does give the cleanest system.


    [0] Not too hard a tack, but when I started providing them for my
    packages, I needed a database to make sure I wasn't creating new patch
    files for unchanged packages.

    [1] myself included. I've performed two 10.0 to 10.3 upgrades, and one
    9.3 to 10.3 upgrade. The hardest part is getting the package
    dependencies right, especially if there are third-party packages
    installed.

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit | openSUSE 11.0a1
    SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit | openSUSE 10.3 64bit
    RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC |RISC OS 3.11

  5. Re: Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a really bad idea?

    Juha Nieminen wrote:

    > Do I understand correctly that one version of Suse (in my case 10.2)
    > uses one version of the kernel, period, and it will never be upgraded to
    > a newer kernel (except for minor security patches)? In other words, Suse
    > 10.2 will always have a 2.6.18 kernel and it will never be upgraded to
    > anything newer, and that if I want a newer kernel I'll have to upgrade
    > to Suse 10.3 (or 11, or whatever)?
    >
    > What would happen if I manually upgraded the kernel to 2.6.22.x? Would
    > it badly break something? Would automated kernel updates stop working
    > (iow. requiring me to start upgrading the kernel manually)?
    >
    > OTOH, I could just upgrade the whole system to Suse 10.3... Is that
    > recommended, or is it more like "if it works, don't fix it"?
    >
    > Btw, is this also so for gcc? Suse 10.2 has gcc 4.1.2, and it will
    > never be upgraded to anything newer? What happens if I manually upgrade
    > it? Would it break something?


    i tried to update the kernel to 2.6.22.9-0.4 the only problem i had was i
    could not get the internet to work there was something missing. I cant
    remember what is was. On thing with the above kernel, i could get most of
    the sensors to work IE to display in gkrellm.

    To install the above kernel i had to uninstall the other kernel source to
    install it. In the end i had to go back to 2.6.18-0.8 and now all only two
    sensors work

    i use a asus M2N-SLI DELUXE motherboard

  6. Re: Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a really bad idea?

    Juha Nieminen wrote:
    > Do I understand correctly that one version of Suse (in my case 10.2)
    > uses one version of the kernel, period, and it will never be upgraded to
    > a newer kernel (except for minor security patches)? In other words, Suse
    > 10.2 will always have a 2.6.18 kernel and it will never be upgraded to
    > anything newer,


    Yes.

    > and that if I want a newer kernel I'll have to upgrade
    > to Suse 10.3 (or 11, or whatever)?


    No.

    > What would happen if I manually upgraded the kernel to 2.6.22.x? Would
    > it badly break something?


    Depends. Normaly it should work perfectly, but it could also break
    things, but then it could also repair things that are broken now.

    > Would automated kernel updates stop working
    > (iow. requiring me to start upgrading the kernel manually)?


    Yes.

    > OTOH, I could just upgrade the whole system to Suse 10.3... Is that
    > recommended, or is it more like "if it works, don't fix it"?


    Everything is a matter of "If it ain't broke, don't fix it"

    > Btw, is this also so for gcc? Suse 10.2 has gcc 4.1.2, and it will
    > never be upgraded to anything newer?


    Yes

    > What happens if I manually upgrade
    > it?


    That we can only know for sure after you tried it. If done correctly,
    nothing special will happen

    > Would it break something?


    Not if done correctly.

    So now the the core of the question: why? What is broken that you want
    to upgrade? Is there some hardware that does not work? If so, what,
    because perhaps there is a way to get it working.

    What is the problem?

    houghi
    --
    You tried, and you failed, so the lesson is, never try. - Homer J. Simpson.

  7. Re: Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a reallybad idea?

    houghi wrote:
    > So now the the core of the question: why?


    The question about the kernel was more theoretical, however, the
    question about gcc was more practical. Newer versions of gcc may
    implement previously-unsupported aspects of the C/C++ standard which I
    might want to play with, as well as new optimizations (eg. I might want
    to get those few percents more velocity for POV-Ray), etc.

  8. Re: Would updating the kernel of my Suse 10.2 to 2.6.22 be a really bad idea?

    Juha Nieminen wrote:
    > houghi wrote:
    >> So now the the core of the question: why?

    >
    > The question about the kernel was more theoretical,


    The don't.

    > however, the
    > question about gcc was more practical. Newer versions of gcc may
    > implement previously-unsupported aspects of the C/C++ standard which I
    > might want to play with, as well as new optimizations (eg. I might want
    > to get those few percents more velocity for POV-Ray), etc.


    Then try it out and see if it works or not. If not, re-install the old
    version.

    houghi
    --
    You tried, and you failed, so the lesson is, never try. - Homer J. Simpson.

+ Reply to Thread