yast2 lvm - Suse

This is a discussion on yast2 lvm - Suse ; Hi, I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre- installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When I go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only 28GB ...

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Thread: yast2 lvm

  1. yast2 lvm

    Hi,

    I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre-
    installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When I
    go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only 28GB of
    the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be? I know that this is
    right because I cannot copy very large files to the server (ie. I
    attempted to copy a 45GB file to the server and got an error telling
    me there was not enough space). How would I go about maximizing all
    the available hard drive capacity?

    Any help would be appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Daniel

  2. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:
    >
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre-
    > installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When I
    > go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only 28GB of
    > the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be?


    The reason can be various. Best ask the seller if the answer is
    importand to you. My guesses are that it is a second hand and that they
    'deleted' the data by unmounting the existing partition.
    The other migh be so that _you_ can decide how to partition it, while
    still ghaving a bootable system.

    > I know that this is right because I cannot copy very large files to
    > the server (ie. I attempted to copy a 45GB file to the server and got
    > an error telling me there was not enough space).


    Use `df -h` to see how much is actualy available on what partitions.

    > How would I go about maximizing all the available hard drive capacity?


    Probably by resizing and certainly by just mounting the rest. Go into
    partitioning and see what the rest of the thing tells you.

    > Any help would be appreciated!


    As you have SLES/D, you could also ask Novell. I do not have that much
    experience with LVM, so wait for somebody else to answer (or look in
    partitioning in YaST and try to solve it yourself)

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  3. Re: yast2 lvm

    On Feb 7, 9:56 am, houghi wrote:
    > Dan wrote:
    >
    > > Hi,

    >
    > > I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre-
    > > installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When I
    > > go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only 28GB of
    > > the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be?

    >
    > The reason can be various. Best ask the seller if the answer is
    > importand to you. My guesses are that it is a second hand and that they
    > 'deleted' the data by unmounting the existing partition.
    > The other migh be so that _you_ can decide how to partition it, while
    > still ghaving a bootable system.
    >
    > > I know that this is right because I cannot copy very large files to
    > > the server (ie. I attempted to copy a 45GB file to the server and got
    > > an error telling me there was not enough space).

    >
    > Use `df -h` to see how much is actualy available on what partitions.
    >
    > > How would I go about maximizing all the available hard drive capacity?

    >
    > Probably by resizing and certainly by just mounting the rest. Go into
    > partitioning and see what the rest of the thing tells you.
    >
    > > Any help would be appreciated!

    >
    > As you have SLES/D, you could also ask Novell. I do not have that much
    > experience with LVM, so wait for somebody else to answer (or look in
    > partitioning in YaST and try to solve it yourself)
    >
    > houghi
    > -->>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources
    >
    > for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    > do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    > then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less


    I should mention that it is a brand new server (bought directly from
    dell) and that neither novell nor dell will support the OS (novell
    says go to dell and dell says I have to have a contract). Anyways, I
    ran the command df -h and this is the output:

    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/mapper/system-root_lv
    4.0G 209M 3.8G 6% /
    udev 502M 188K 502M 1% /dev
    /dev/sda3 204M 41M 164M 20% /boot
    /dev/mapper/system-opt_lv
    3.0G 857M 2.2G 28% /opt
    /dev/mapper/system-srv_lv
    3.0G 34M 3.0G 2% /srv
    /dev/mapper/system-tmp_lv
    3.0G 33M 3.0G 2% /tmp
    /dev/mapper/system-usr_lv
    7.0G 2.6G 4.5G 37% /usr
    /dev/mapper/system-var_lv
    3.0G 943M 2.1G 31% /var
    /dev/mapper/system-home_lv
    5.0G 902M 4.2G 18% /home

    I guess my next question would be which lvm partition should I add the
    space to? In the yast2 lvm window it gives me the option to resize one
    of the lvm partions, but I am not sure which one is the best to resize
    or which one should be resized.

    Thanks again,
    Daniel

  4. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre-
    > installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When I
    > go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only 28GB of
    > the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be? I know that this is
    > right because I cannot copy very large files to the server (ie. I
    > attempted to copy a 45GB file to the server and got an error telling
    > me there was not enough space). How would I go about maximizing all
    > the available hard drive capacity?
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated!
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Daniel

    If its a raid array across three disks wouldn't the total capacity be
    the same as a single drive ie 73 Gb.?

    --
    Regards:
    Baron.

  5. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:
    > I should mention that it is a brand new server (bought directly from
    > dell) and that neither novell nor dell will support the OS (novell
    > says go to dell and dell says I have to have a contract). Anyways, I
    > ran the command df -h and this is the output:


    Well, DUH. You _do_ have the Enterprise, so that should go without
    saying that you need a contract to get support. You can buy one from
    Novell directly. Just curious:Where do you get your updates from?


    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  6. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:
    > [...]
    > I guess my next question would be which lvm partition should I add the
    > space to? In the yast2 lvm window it gives me the option to resize one
    > of the lvm partions, but I am not sure which one is the best to resize
    > or which one should be resized.


    /home and /usr will need plenty of space. /opt about 5GB. /srv as much
    as you plan to put on FTP and WWW server. However, the point of LVM is
    that your decision is not final; should it later prove that you need
    space elsewhere, you can give more space to "elsewhere". For now, /usr
    and /home will need most the space, and maybe /srv if you need much web
    and FTP space.

  7. Re: yast2 lvm

    On Feb 7, 10:53 am, houghi wrote:
    > Dan wrote:
    > > I should mention that it is a brand new server (bought directly from
    > > dell) and that neither novell nor dell will support the OS (novell
    > > says go to dell and dell says I have to have a contract). Anyways, I
    > > ran the command df -h and this is the output:

    >
    > Well, DUH. You _do_ have the Enterprise, so that should go without
    > saying that you need a contract to get support. You can buy one from
    > Novell directly. Just curious:Where do you get your updates from?
    >
    > houghi
    > -->>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources
    >
    > for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    > do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    > then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less


    I would have expected that Dell would support Suse Linux in the same
    manor it does Windows XP ie. help is provided so long as the computer
    is under warranty (which mine is)

  8. Re: yast2 lvm

    On Feb 7, 11:07 am, Nikos Chantziaras wrote:
    > Dan wrote:
    > > [...]
    > > I guess my next question would be which lvm partition should I add the
    > > space to? In the yast2 lvm window it gives me the option to resize one
    > > of the lvm partions, but I am not sure which one is the best to resize
    > > or which one should be resized.

    >
    > /home and /usr will need plenty of space. /opt about 5GB. /srv as much
    > as you plan to put on FTP and WWW server. However, the point of LVM is
    > that your decision is not final; should it later prove that you need
    > space elsewhere, you can give more space to "elsewhere". For now, /usr
    > and /home will need most the space, and maybe /srv if you need much web
    > and FTP space.


    Thanks for your advice. I guess I am just used to the Windows
    environment where this type of concept is almost non-existent. Is it
    possible just to merge all of these LVM into one (or would this even
    been advisable)?

  9. Re: yast2 lvm

    On Feb 7, 10:49 am, Baron wrote:
    > Dan wrote:
    > > Hi,

    >
    > > I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre-
    > > installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When I
    > > go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only 28GB of
    > > the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be? I know that this is
    > > right because I cannot copy very large files to the server (ie. I
    > > attempted to copy a 45GB file to the server and got an error telling
    > > me there was not enough space). How would I go about maximizing all
    > > the available hard drive capacity?

    >
    > > Any help would be appreciated!

    >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Daniel

    >
    > If its a raid array across three disks wouldn't the total capacity be
    > the same as a single drive ie 73 Gb.?
    >
    > --
    > Regards:
    > Baron.


    No, raid 5 allows for only a single drive failure. Unlike raid 1,
    raid 5 doesnt use 1:1 ratio. In my system Raid 5 provides 2*73GB =
    146GB with the capacity for one drive failure and no data loss.

  10. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:

    > On Feb 7, 9:56 am, houghi wrote:
    >> Dan wrote:
    >>
    >> > Hi,

    >>
    >> > I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre-
    >> > installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When
    >> > I go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only
    >> > 28GB of
    >> > the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be?


    > I should mention that it is a brand new server (bought directly from
    > dell) and that neither novell nor dell will support the OS (novell
    > says go to dell and dell says I have to have a contract). Anyways, I
    > ran the command df -h and this is the output:
    >
    > Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    > /dev/mapper/system-root_lv
    > 4.0G 209M 3.8G 6% /
    > udev 502M 188K 502M 1% /dev
    > /dev/sda3 204M 41M 164M 20% /boot
    > /dev/mapper/system-opt_lv
    > 3.0G 857M 2.2G 28% /opt
    > /dev/mapper/system-srv_lv
    > 3.0G 34M 3.0G 2% /srv
    > /dev/mapper/system-tmp_lv
    > 3.0G 33M 3.0G 2% /tmp
    > /dev/mapper/system-usr_lv
    > 7.0G 2.6G 4.5G 37% /usr
    > /dev/mapper/system-var_lv
    > 3.0G 943M 2.1G 31% /var
    > /dev/mapper/system-home_lv
    > 5.0G 902M 4.2G 18% /home
    >
    > I guess my next question would be which lvm partition should I add the
    > space to?


    My guess is that at Dell they did not partition all the space available.
    Could you post the output of 'fdisk -l'?
    Just for comparision a LVM system with a single disk:

    # fdisk -l

    Disk /dev/sda: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x0

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 2089 16779861 83 Linux
    /dev/sda2 2090 2612 4200997+ 82 Linux swap /
    Solaris
    /dev/sda3 2613 19457 135307462+ 8e Linux LVM

    Here /dev/sda3 was formatted as an LVM drive.

    # df -h

    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1 16G 5.8G 9.2G 39% /
    udev 993M 104K 993M 1% /dev
    /dev/mapper/system-home
    40G 14G 25G 36% /home
    /dev/mapper/system-projects
    35G 22G 11G 67% /projects
    /dev/mapper/system-scratch
    22G 284M 21G 2% /scratch

    The devices /dev/mapper/* are three logical volumes which all live
    in /dev/sda3 while in this case the root directory '/' has it's own
    primary partition. IMHO a good idea as the system will be bootable even
    if the LVM stuff fails. This partition is far too big, btw.

    Read the documentation for the YAST tools on LVM. Also the LVM manuals
    are very useful as not all LVM features can be done via YAST, e.g.
    snapshot volumes which are extremely handy on a server machine:
    http://tldp.org/HOWTO/LVM-HOWTO/

    GŁnther

  11. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:
    > I would have expected that Dell would support Suse Linux in the same
    > manor it does Windows XP ie. help is provided so long as the computer
    > is under warranty (which mine is)


    Me as well. However I do not have any details of how the sale went, nor
    any documentation or what the legal part of it is in your country.

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  12. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:
    > Thanks for your advice. I guess I am just used to the Windows
    > environment where this type of concept is almost non-existent. Is it
    > possible just to merge all of these LVM into one (or would this even
    > been advisable)?


    Yes, it can be done. No, it is not wise to do so. That said, what you
    can do with it depends highly on what you are going to do with it. If
    you are going to use it as a standard home PC, I would just format the
    rest as /data and then put all the data there, or extend /home.

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  13. Re: yast2 lvm

    On Feb 7, 4:28 pm, GŁnther Schwarz wrote:
    > Dan wrote:
    > > On Feb 7, 9:56 am, houghi wrote:
    > >> Dan wrote:

    >
    > >> > Hi,

    >
    > >> > I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre-
    > >> > installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When
    > >> > I go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only
    > >> > 28GB of
    > >> > the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be?

    > > I should mention that it is a brand new server (bought directly from
    > > dell) and that neither novell nor dell will support the OS (novell
    > > says go to dell and dell says I have to have a contract). Anyways, I
    > > ran the command df -h and this is the output:

    >
    > > Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    > > /dev/mapper/system-root_lv
    > > 4.0G 209M 3.8G 6% /
    > > udev 502M 188K 502M 1% /dev
    > > /dev/sda3 204M 41M 164M 20% /boot
    > > /dev/mapper/system-opt_lv
    > > 3.0G 857M 2.2G 28% /opt
    > > /dev/mapper/system-srv_lv
    > > 3.0G 34M 3.0G 2% /srv
    > > /dev/mapper/system-tmp_lv
    > > 3.0G 33M 3.0G 2% /tmp
    > > /dev/mapper/system-usr_lv
    > > 7.0G 2.6G 4.5G 37% /usr
    > > /dev/mapper/system-var_lv
    > > 3.0G 943M 2.1G 31% /var
    > > /dev/mapper/system-home_lv
    > > 5.0G 902M 4.2G 18% /home

    >
    > > I guess my next question would be which lvm partition should I add the
    > > space to?

    >
    > My guess is that at Dell they did not partition all the space available.
    > Could you post the output of 'fdisk -l'?
    > Just for comparision a LVM system with a single disk:
    >
    > # fdisk -l
    >
    > Disk /dev/sda: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
    > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
    > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    > Disk identifier: 0x0
    >
    > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > /dev/sda1 * 1 2089 16779861 83 Linux
    > /dev/sda2 2090 2612 4200997+ 82 Linux swap /
    > Solaris
    > /dev/sda3 2613 19457 135307462+ 8e Linux LVM
    >
    > Here /dev/sda3 was formatted as an LVM drive.
    >
    > # df -h
    >
    > Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    > /dev/sda1 16G 5.8G 9.2G 39% /
    > udev 993M 104K 993M 1% /dev
    > /dev/mapper/system-home
    > 40G 14G 25G 36% /home
    > /dev/mapper/system-projects
    > 35G 22G 11G 67% /projects
    > /dev/mapper/system-scratch
    > 22G 284M 21G 2% /scratch
    >
    > The devices /dev/mapper/* are three logical volumes which all live
    > in /dev/sda3 while in this case the root directory '/' has it's own
    > primary partition. IMHO a good idea as the system will be bootable even
    > if the LVM stuff fails. This partition is far too big, btw.
    >
    > Read the documentation for the YAST tools on LVM. Also the LVM manuals
    > are very useful as not all LVM features can be done via YAST, e.g.
    > snapshot volumes which are extremely handy on a server machine:http://tldp..org/HOWTO/LVM-HOWTO/
    >
    > GŁnther



    Disk /dev/sda: 145.4 GB, 145492017152 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 17688 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 1 11 88326 de Dell Utility
    /dev/sda2 12 664 5245222+ 8e Linux LVM
    /dev/sda3 * 665 690 208845 83 Linux
    /dev/sda4 691 17688 136536435 f W95 Ext'd
    (LBA)
    /dev/sda5 691 882 1542208+ 82 Linux swap /
    Solaris
    /dev/sda6 883 17688 134994163+ 8e Linux LVM

  14. Re: yast2 lvm

    On Feb 7, 4:39 pm, houghi wrote:
    > Dan wrote:
    > > I would have expected that Dell would support Suse Linux in the same
    > > manor it does Windows XP ie. help is provided so long as the computer
    > > is under warranty (which mine is)

    >
    > Me as well. However I do not have any details of how the sale went, nor
    > any documentation or what the legal part of it is in your country.
    >
    > houghi
    > -->>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources
    >
    > for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    > do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    > then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less


    Ok, well for now I am just going to make the /home LVM as large as
    possible (this is where all the server files will be stored) unless
    someone can advise me on merging all the LVM partitions. I would also
    like to decrease the LVM size of some of the partitions that will not
    be used as much but it says "The logical volume is currently mounted
    on /usr It is not possible to resize the file system while it is
    mounted." What happens when I unmount /usr in order to decrease its
    size? How do I remount it? Also, my final question is what happens to
    a given directory when its LVM partition is removed?

    You guys have been a bunch of help!
    Thanks again,
    Daniel

  15. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:
    > Ok, well for now I am just going to make the /home LVM as large as
    > possible (this is where all the server files will be stored) unless
    > someone can advise me on merging all the LVM partitions. I would also
    > like to decrease the LVM size of some of the partitions that will not
    > be used as much but it says "The logical volume is currently mounted
    > on /usr It is not possible to resize the file system while it is
    > mounted." What happens when I unmount /usr in order to decrease its
    > size? How do I remount it? Also, my final question is what happens to
    > a given directory when its LVM partition is removed?


    Again, sorry no experience (or bno good experience) with LVM, but I am
    seriously interested in where you will be getting your updates.

    Also: what will you be using the machine for? Perhaps it is better to
    take a step back and do a re-installation with a configuration you are
    familiar with and/or suits your specific needs.

    If I would buy a server that is going to be used in a working
    enviroment, that is what I would do. Buy a pre-installed SUSE box, so I
    am 100% sure that the hardware is suported and then install it the way I
    want, with the software I want and the configuration I want, so that if
    something goes wrong, I already have an understanding of all the basics.

    Playing with LVM might then happen on a testmachine.

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  16. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:

    > On Feb 7, 4:28 pm, GŁnther Schwarz wrote:
    >> Dan wrote:
    >> > On Feb 7, 9:56 am, houghi wrote:
    >> >> Dan wrote:

    >>
    >> >> > Hi,

    >>
    >> >> > I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10
    >> >> > pre-
    >> >> > installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5.
    >> >> > When I go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that
    >> >> > only 28GB of
    >> >> > the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be?
    >> > I should mention that it is a brand new server (bought directly
    >> > from dell) and that neither novell nor dell will support the OS
    >> > (novell
    >> > says go to dell and dell says I have to have a contract). Anyways,
    >> > I ran the command df -h and this is the output:

    >>
    >> > Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    >> > /dev/mapper/system-root_lv
    >> > 4.0G 209M 3.8G 6% /
    >> > udev 502M 188K 502M 1% /dev
    >> > /dev/sda3 204M 41M 164M 20% /boot
    >> > /dev/mapper/system-opt_lv
    >> > 3.0G 857M 2.2G 28% /opt
    >> > /dev/mapper/system-srv_lv
    >> > 3.0G 34M 3.0G 2% /srv
    >> > /dev/mapper/system-tmp_lv
    >> > 3.0G 33M 3.0G 2% /tmp
    >> > /dev/mapper/system-usr_lv
    >> > 7.0G 2.6G 4.5G 37% /usr
    >> > /dev/mapper/system-var_lv
    >> > 3.0G 943M 2.1G 31% /var
    >> > /dev/mapper/system-home_lv
    >> > 5.0G 902M 4.2G 18% /home

    >>
    >> > I guess my next question would be which lvm partition should I add
    >> > the space to?

    >>
    >> My guess is that at Dell they did not partition all the space
    >> available. Could you post the output of 'fdisk -l'?


    > Disk /dev/sda: 145.4 GB, 145492017152 bytes
    > 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 17688 cylinders
    > Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    >
    > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > /dev/sda1 1 11 88326 de Dell Utility
    > /dev/sda2 12 664 5245222+ 8e Linux LVM
    > /dev/sda3 * 665 690 208845 83 Linux
    > /dev/sda4 691 17688 136536435 f W95 Ext'd
    > (LBA)
    > /dev/sda5 691 882 1542208+ 82 Linux swap /
    > Solaris
    > /dev/sda6 883 17688 134994163+ 8e Linux LVM


    That's strange what they are doing at Dell :-)
    Apart from the 'Dell Utility' /dev/sda1 (whatever this is good for), the
    boot partition running from 665 to 690, and the swap partition
    (691-882) you have two LVM partitions in the system. No unformatted
    space on the RAID system obviously. So you can extend the logical
    volumes /dev/mapper/* up to the size you need them. Check the manuals
    carefully before doing so and probably set up a test system on an old
    PC or such in order to make yourself familiar with how LVM works.
    If it was my system, however, I would restart from scratch. Who wants a
    swap partition as an extended one? Something like:

    /dev/sda1 1 11 Dell Utility
    /dev/sda2 * 11 2089 Linux
    /dev/sda3 2090 2612 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda4 2613 17688 Linux LVM

    following the example I showed above.

    GŁnther

  17. Re: yast2 lvm

    On Thu, 07 Feb 2008 11:01:50 -0800, Dan wrote:

    > On Feb 7, 10:49 am, Baron wrote:
    >> Dan wrote:
    >> > Hi,

    >>
    >> > I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre-
    >> > installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When I
    >> > go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only 28GB
    >> > of the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be? I know that this
    >> > is right because I cannot copy very large files to the server (ie. I
    >> > attempted to copy a 45GB file to the server and got an error telling
    >> > me there was not enough space). How would I go about maximizing all
    >> > the available hard drive capacity?

    >>
    >> > Any help would be appreciated!

    >>
    >> > Thanks,
    >> > Daniel

    >>


    I'm with the other posters, there is no need to keep the configuration
    the way it is. If I were you I would wipe everything and start again.
    You don't even need to use LVM if you prefer not to.
    Remember you bought an enterprise server, and with most companies who buy
    these servers the first thing they would do is ensure raid was enabled
    and use LVM. This is probably why yours was configured this way.

    But LVM need only be enabled if you want to use it.

    Otherwise remove everything and re-install and create the partitions as
    necessary. There are a large number of guides out there for partitioning
    schemes on Linux.
    Raid is obviously important for data security, but LVM is only necessary
    to enable easier partition management. If you know how you want to
    partition all your remaining space, LVM wont give you much extra.

    For assistance with partitioning just put the following "Linux
    partitioning how to" into google for a large list of possible solutions.


  18. Re: yast2 lvm

    On Feb 9, 2:01 pm, panitoni wrote:
    > On Thu, 07 Feb 2008 11:01:50 -0800, Dan wrote:
    > > On Feb 7, 10:49 am, Baron wrote:
    > >> Dan wrote:
    > >> > Hi,

    >
    > >> > I recently bought a dell server with suse linux enterprise 10 pre-
    > >> > installed. This server has three 73GB hard drives on RAID 5. When I
    > >> > go into yast2 and select system then lvm it shows me that only 28GB
    > >> > of the 133.7GB is partitioned. Why would this be? I know that this
    > >> > is right because I cannot copy very large files to the server (ie. I
    > >> > attempted to copy a 45GB file to the server and got an error telling
    > >> > me there was not enough space). How would I go about maximizing all
    > >> > the available hard drive capacity?

    >
    > >> > Any help would be appreciated!

    >
    > >> > Thanks,
    > >> > Daniel

    >
    > I'm with the other posters, there is no need to keep the configuration
    > the way it is. If I were you I would wipe everything and start again.
    > You don't even need to use LVM if you prefer not to.
    > Remember you bought an enterprise server, and with most companies who buy
    > these servers the first thing they would do is ensure raid was enabled
    > and use LVM. This is probably why yours was configured this way.
    >
    > But LVM need only be enabled if you want to use it.
    >
    > Otherwise remove everything and re-install and create the partitions as
    > necessary. There are a large number of guides out there for partitioning
    > schemes on Linux.
    > Raid is obviously important for data security, but LVM is only necessary
    > to enable easier partition management. If you know how you want to
    > partition all your remaining space, LVM wont give you much extra.
    >
    > For assistance with partitioning just put the following "Linux
    > partitioning how to" into google for a large list of possible solutions.


    I thank everyone for all the help and advice provided here. I agree
    that usually with any new computer (sever or not) the best thing to do
    is reformat it right off the bat. Unfortunately, my limited
    experience with linux and my restricted time frame didn't provide this
    as an option. Since this server is already acting as a production web
    server there is no future plans for reformatting (unless someone can
    point me to a 5 min reformat process )

    Daniel

  19. Re: yast2 lvm

    Dan wrote:

    > I thank everyone for all the help and advice provided here. I agree
    > that usually with any new computer (sever or not) the best thing to do
    > is reformat it right off the bat. Unfortunately, my limited
    > experience with linux and my restricted time frame didn't provide this
    > as an option. Since this server is already acting as a production web
    > server there is no future plans for reformatting (unless someone can
    > point me to a 5 min reformat process )


    Actually that it what LVM is made for :-)
    As a remark not related to the file system I want to second houghi in
    that you should make sure that the system gets the latest patches from
    Novell at least on a daily basis. Running a web server just with the
    packets from the installation source is lightheaded to the extreme.
    Also make yourself familiar with how the packet filter scripts (SuSE
    firewall) and in general iptables in Linux work.

    GŁnther

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