New to Suse - Suse

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Thread: New to Suse

  1. New to Suse

    I used UNIX for years (20+ before retiring) and have had several
    releases of Redhat over the several years since. I would like to try
    Suse but haven't jumped in yet -- too much 'stuff' on RH that I'll have
    to move.

    I'm downloading SUSE 10.3 now and will try (on a separate HD). Do any
    of you have any pointers/suggestions/advice before I load it up?

    Thanks,

    Glen

  2. Re: New to Suse

    Glen wrote:
    > I'm downloading SUSE 10.3 now and will try (on a separate HD). Do any
    > of you have any pointers/suggestions/advice before I load it up?


    You mean besides the obvious http://openSUSE.org?

    houghi
    --
    At the source of every error which is blamed on the computer you will
    find at least two human errors, including the error of blaming it on
    the computer.

  3. Re: New to Suse

    In article ,
    houghi@houghi.org.invalid says...
    > Glen wrote:
    > > I'm downloading SUSE 10.3 now and will try (on a separate HD). Do any
    > > of you have any pointers/suggestions/advice before I load it up?

    >
    > You mean besides the obvious http://openSUSE.org?
    >
    > houghi
    >

    Obviously, so get real houghi. Else, I wouldn't have posted the
    question. Perhaps everything YOU know is posted there. I find it
    highly unlikely that that is the case for all but a small minority of
    SUSE users.

  4. Re: New to Suse

    Glen wrote:
    > In article ,
    > houghi@houghi.org.invalid says...
    >> Glen wrote:
    >> > I'm downloading SUSE 10.3 now and will try (on a separate HD). Do any
    >> > of you have any pointers/suggestions/advice before I load it up?

    >>
    >> You mean besides the obvious http://openSUSE.org?
    >>
    >> houghi
    >>

    > Obviously,


    Then no. The questions are easier to answer when they are actualy there.
    Giving you a list of what MIGHT happen is a waste of time for you, us
    and everybody.

    I could go over a whole list, but that would cost more time and will not
    be complete the you downloading it and do the installation.

    So no, not everything is posted here, nor on openSUSE, but with such a
    generic question, I could copy whole books and not answer your question
    correctly.

    houghi
    --
    At the source of every error which is blamed on the computer you will
    find at least two human errors, including the error of blaming it on
    the computer.

  5. Re: New to Suse

    On Wed, 5 Dec 2007, Glen wrote:-

    >In article ,
    >houghi@houghi.org.invalid says...
    >> Glen wrote:
    >> > I'm downloading SUSE 10.3 now and will try (on a separate HD). Do any
    >> > of you have any pointers/suggestions/advice before I load it up?

    >>
    >> You mean besides the obvious http://openSUSE.org?
    >>
    >> houghi
    >>

    >Obviously, so get real houghi. Else, I wouldn't have posted the
    >question.


    And what sort of information are you really looking for? Suggestions
    like "back up everything in /home, all your configuration files, etc." ?

    Or maybe to do with the actual installation? I don't know if know about
    the change to libata, but you're going to find all the devices listed as
    SCSI rather than the older mix of IDE and SCSI. Or maybe you're looking
    for some other information to do with the installation. If so, what?

    Maybe you're looking for upgrade advice? Since you're not using an older
    version of (open)SUSE you don't need that at the moment. When you do,
    the same "back up everything... " advice stands. And if, and when, you
    do end up performing an upgrade installation, come back for advice then
    and I'm sure you'll find people more than willing to provide it.

    >Perhaps everything YOU know is posted there.


    Well, I know for a fact that a lot of the things I know aren't posted
    there[0]. I also know that there's a lot of things posted there that I
    _don't_ know. I knew it was possible to take screen-shots during the
    installation, but not how. I didn't know I could start a shell up prior
    to starting the installation.

    >I find it
    >highly unlikely that that is the case for all but a small minority of
    >SUSE users.


    I find it very unlikely that there's a great deal of the combined
    knowledge of the various posters, both here and in the other forums,
    that has ended up on the openSUSE wiki. However, your initial question
    was a little vague as to just what sort of information you were looking
    for. Be more specific and you'll get much more help.


    [0] My experience in getting 10.3 onto an old iMac, both the good and
    bad points. Or how I managed to perform an almost flawless upgrade of
    both a SUSE 10.0 and a SUSE 9.3 box to openSUSE 10.3. I don't think
    there's a step-by-step, possibly pictorial, guide to upgrading[1] a
    previous version to openSUSE 10.3 while keeping the contents of /home.

    [1] I don't know if there's a guide to performing a fresh install while
    keeping a previous /home either. I might just have to create one of
    those as well.

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit
    SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit |
    RISC OS 3.11 | RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC

  6. Re: New to Suse

    David Bolt wrote:
    > Well, I know for a fact that a lot of the things I know aren't posted
    > there[0]. I also know that there's a lot of things posted there that I
    > _don't_ know. I knew it was possible to take screen-shots during the
    > installation, but not how.


    http://en.opensuse.org/Making_Installation_screenshots
    Basicaly you press as some random person has added to
    that page. :-)

    > I didn't know I could start a shell up prior
    > to starting the installation.


    Prior and during as well. As you know, there is a LOT that can be done
    with an during the installation. It is a pitty that that is a bit
    unknown. If many more people would be aware of the real power of YaST as
    a tool and the language it is written in. Othewise many more tools would
    have been written for YaST and perhaps other distributions would have
    adapted it as well.
    It is more then an installation tool.

    > [1] I don't know if there's a guide to performing a fresh install while
    > keeping a previous /home either. I might just have to create one of
    > those as well.


    The problem with such guides is that they become too specific too easy
    and then too hard to maintain, unless you make it very generic:

    The main part would be about explaining how to select specific
    partitions to install. Basicaly it would be
    1) Determine what the / is on your old installation
    2) Select to format / and not format /home (and any other partition and
    mountpount
    3) Go on.

    Considering the ease of actualy doing this, when writing it down in a
    Wiki, you will be starting about the difefernces in 10.2 and 10.3 in
    naming devices. Have situations where they come from different
    installation. All kinds of things that are different on specific
    instalations and configurations. And what when people have 2, 3, 204
    differt distributions?

    There will be so many exceptions that it will be very hard to find back
    the general rule of just thinking of NOT formatting the partitions you
    do not want to have formatted.

    houghi
    --
    At the source of every error which is blamed on the computer you will
    find at least two human errors, including the error of blaming it on
    the computer.

  7. Re: New to Suse

    On Wed, 05 Dec 2007 13:26:39 +0000, Glen wrote:

    > In article ,
    > houghi@houghi.org.invalid says...
    >> Glen wrote:
    >> > I'm downloading SUSE 10.3 now and will try (on a separate HD). Do any
    >> > of you have any pointers/suggestions/advice before I load it up?

    >>
    >> You mean besides the obvious http://openSUSE.org?
    >>
    >> houghi
    >>

    > Obviously, so get real houghi. Else, I wouldn't have posted the
    > question. Perhaps everything YOU know is posted there. I find it
    > highly unlikely that that is the case for all but a small minority of
    > SUSE users.


    The obious is frequently overlooked. If you'd like more directed answers,
    I suggest you ask more directed questions.


  8. Re: New to Suse

    On Wed, 05 Dec 2007 00:30:12 +0000, Glen wrote:

    > I used UNIX for years (20+ before retiring) and have had several
    > releases of Redhat over the several years since. I would like to try
    > Suse but haven't jumped in yet -- too much 'stuff' on RH that I'll have
    > to move.
    >
    > I'm downloading SUSE 10.3 now and will try (on a separate HD). Do any
    > of you have any pointers/suggestions/advice before I load it up?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Glen


    Hi Glen,

    You should find the OpenSUSE install pretty painless. The defaults are
    sensible but there are options for customisation to the disk layout,
    choice of desktops, software to be installed etc. OpenSUSE is pretty
    good at recognising most hardware. In any case you could ask here with
    more specific questions if it goes wrong in some way.

    Once it is installed, you should try to do your customisation, software
    installs, hardware configurations in Yast (in the menu) as much as
    possible. You should go into the Software section, into the Community
    Repositories and activate OSS, NON-OSS, Packman, Mozilla, VideoLan and
    any other repostories of interest. Then go into Software Management and
    search for and install/update mplayer, mplayer-plugins, xine and
    libdvdcss. That should give you a good start at playing DVDs and other
    video mdeia.

    Hope this helps.

    JohnK

  9. Re: New to Suse

    On Wed, 5 Dec 2007, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:
    >> Well, I know for a fact that a lot of the things I know aren't posted
    >> there[0]. I also know that there's a lot of things posted there that I
    >> _don't_ know. I knew it was possible to take screen-shots during the
    >> installation, but not how.

    >
    >http://en.opensuse.org/Making_Installation_screenshots
    >Basicaly you press as some random person has added to
    >that page. :-)


    That didn't work initially. The reason it failed was that the "abort"
    button was highlighted and, because of that, the button
    had no effect. As soon as I'd used the tab key to move to highlight a
    different pane, it worked. You can see what I mean in this image:



    The highlighted pane is the lower one, as shown by its blue outline. It
    also works when the top pane is highlighted, but there's no outline with
    that one, as shown by:



    >> I didn't know I could start a shell up prior
    >> to starting the installation.

    >
    >Prior and during as well.


    I knew about having a shell _during_ the install. I didn't know you
    could have one before YaST started up.

    >As you know, there is a LOT that can be done
    >with an during the installation.


    Like using slrn over an ssh connection while the install is taking
    place? :-)

    Next time, it might be fun to take the screen shots, use console #2 to
    copying them to another machine. At the same time as you're logged into
    that same machine using console #5 so you can write/update a web page
    showing the latest screen shot, and then posting a link to it in this
    group using slrn over another ssh connection on console #6. :-)

    >It is a pitty that that is a bit
    >unknown.


    Yep.

    >If many more people would be aware of the real power of YaST as
    >a tool and the language it is written in. Othewise many more tools would
    >have been written for YaST and perhaps other distributions would have
    >adapted it as well.


    AFAIK, someone did try porting it to Debian. Haven't heard much about
    that in a long while.

    >It is more then an installation tool.


    It still doesn't bring me hot cups of tea though.

    >> [1] I don't know if there's a guide to performing a fresh install while
    >> keeping a previous /home either. I might just have to create one of
    >> those as well.

    >
    >The problem with such guides is that they become too specific too easy
    >and then too hard to maintain, unless you make it very generic:


    There's nothing wrong with them being specific. All it takes is an hour
    or two every eight months to perform a new install, grab the new screen
    shots. The same again for an upgrade. Updating the pages would probably
    add another couple of hours, or so, for each one. It wouldn't need a
    complete rewrite as a lot could be carried over from a previous pages as
    a lot of the info would be generic anyway. It's not like YaST2 has had
    any radical changes in the last few years.

    >The main part would be about explaining how to select specific
    >partitions to install. Basicaly it would be
    >1) Determine what the / is on your old installation
    >2) Select to format / and not format /home (and any other partition and
    >mountpount
    >3) Go on.


    Sounds familiar, although my example was a bit of a bad one for someone
    who only has the one installation, as it was created using a system with
    a few other distributions installed and I had to make sure I picked the
    right on. For someone that has at least one other distribution/version
    installed, they're not likely to need the example.

    >Considering the ease of actualy doing this, when writing it down in a
    >Wiki, you will be starting about the difefernces in 10.2 and 10.3 in
    >naming devices.


    Well, in my case it wasn't about 10.2 and 10.3. I blogged about my
    upgrade from 9.3 to 10.3, and 10.0 to 10.3. I had thought about putting
    it on my wiki, but changed my mind.

    >Have situations where they come from different
    >installation. All kinds of things that are different on specific
    >instalations and configurations.


    Most things are common between the different versions, although there
    are some changes with each one. With 10.2 the main change was from
    selections to patterns. 10.3 gained network access at the beginning of
    the installation, not part way through.

    >And what when people have 2, 3, 204
    >differt distributions?


    If they have more than the one Linux distribution, they're not going to
    be in need of a slide-show and beginners guide. If they are, I'd wonder
    just how they managed to install more than one distribution in the first
    place.

    >There will be so many exceptions that it will be very hard to find back
    >the general rule of just thinking of NOT formatting the partitions you
    >do not want to have formatted.


    Create a generic guide, one for a fresh install based upon the default
    options, and then one for an upgrade. The upgrade won't have any changes
    to the file systems, and the fresh install only requires images to show
    the importing of the old fstab, selecting the old / and making sure it's
    going to be reformatted. You'll probably have noticed that when you do
    import an old fstab, none of the old partitions are marked to be
    reformatted.

    If anyone needs anything beyond that, e.g. making sure they don't format
    a partition belonging to another installation, or a data partition they
    set up outside /home, they're not going to be beginners and are more
    likely[0] to know what they're doing.


    [0] Won't say "do know" because I'm sure there are some people that have
    created quite complex partitioning on the basis of something they've
    read online somewhere, but don't know what to do without quite a lot of
    hand-holding.

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit
    SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit |
    RISC OS 3.11 | RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC

  10. Re: New to Suse

    David Bolt wrote:
    > Next time, it might be fun to take the screen shots, use console #2 to
    > copying them to another machine. At the same time as you're logged into
    > that same machine using console #5 so you can write/update a web page
    > showing the latest screen shot, and then posting a link to it in this
    > group using slrn over another ssh connection on console #6. :-)


    Well, write a script that looks in the directory where you will place
    the scripts and then each time there is a new one upload it. That script
    you place on a website and the do something like `wget
    http://server/script.sh && sh script.sh`
    Obviously, the script will do what it needs to do in the background,
    sees that it runs itself after the reboot, so that the screenshots you
    take then are OK as well and launch the ssh connection, so you can run
    slrn on the remote machine.

    It can also do many other things for you. Limitless.

    > AFAIK, someone did try porting it to Debian. Haven't heard much about
    > that in a long while.


    http://yast4debian.alioth.debian.org/ and the fate on that is 20050424

    >>It is more then an installation tool.

    >
    > It still doesn't bring me hot cups of tea though.


    Tea is hard. At least for coffe there is an RFC you can use:
    http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc2324.html

    > There's nothing wrong with them being specific. All it takes is an hour
    > or two every eight months to perform a new install, grab the new screen
    > shots. The same again for an upgrade. Updating the pages would probably
    > add another couple of hours, or so, for each one. It wouldn't need a
    > complete rewrite as a lot could be carried over from a previous pages as
    > a lot of the info would be generic anyway. It's not like YaST2 has had
    > any radical changes in the last few years.


    So when is the page ready? ;-)

    >>The main part would be about explaining how to select specific
    >>partitions to install. Basicaly it would be
    >>1) Determine what the / is on your old installation
    >>2) Select to format / and not format /home (and any other partition and
    >>mountpount
    >>3) Go on.

    >
    > Sounds familiar, although my example


    I was just talking from the top of my head, not taking a specific
    example.

    > was a bit of a bad one for someone
    > who only has the one installation, as it was created using a system with
    > a few other distributions installed and I had to make sure I picked the
    > right on. For someone that has at least one other distribution/version
    > installed, they're not likely to need the example.


    Well, that would need to be speciefied on the page as well, and perhaps
    explained why they should NOT use the page.

    > If they have more than the one Linux distribution, they're not going to
    > be in need of a slide-show and beginners guide. If they are, I'd wonder
    > just how they managed to install more than one distribution in the first
    > place.


    Sometimes I wonder too. I tried helping someone in another group with
    Ubuntu and as far as I understood, 2 openSUSE 10.3 installations. I was
    unable to get any extra information about hard drive partitions, fstab
    or menu.lst on either Ubuntu or openSUSE.

    I realy wonderd how he was able to install at least 3 (wait, there was
    some Windows as well, I believe) distributions and have no clue about
    these things.

    > If anyone needs anything beyond that, e.g. making sure they don't format
    > a partition belonging to another installation, or a data partition they
    > set up outside /home, they're not going to be beginners and are more
    > likely[0] to know what they're doing.


    My idea would be to make it very gereric from the start. e.g. how to
    install a new openSUSE while maintaining one or more partitions.

    Then you can say that the person needs to have at least one partition he
    can afort to delete, Instead of screenshots, you could try out wink:
    http://www.debugmode.com/wink/

    Mmm. Let's see what I can do. Parallels is started up and the boot is at
    the "Installation Mode" screen. Let me see how fast I can get such a
    presentation online. :-) Watch the headers for times.

    houghi
    --
    At the source of every error which is blamed on the computer you will
    find at least two human errors, including the error of blaming it on
    the computer.

  11. Re: New to Suse

    houghi wrote:
    > Then you can say that the person needs to have at least one partition he
    > can afort to delete, Instead of screenshots, you could try out wink:
    > http://www.debugmode.com/wink/
    >
    > Mmm. Let's see what I can do. Parallels is started up and the boot is at
    > the "Installation Mode" screen. Let me see how fast I can get such a
    > presentation online. :-) Watch the headers for times.


    Me and my big mouth. The first time I made movie instead of different
    screenshots, so I had to do that part of the installation again. The
    second time I was finished and was able to close the program instead of
    pressing save, so all was lost. Sigh, I am a dork. I did not feel doing
    it a third time.

    Let it be said that it is an easy program to use. Here something I did a
    while ago in several minutes. http://houghi.org/wink/menu_show.htm
    Very unimpresive, I know.

    houghi
    --
    At the source of every error which is blamed on the computer you will
    find at least two human errors, including the error of blaming it on
    the computer.

  12. Re: New to Suse

    On Wed, 5 Dec 2007, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:
    >> Next time, it might be fun to take the screen shots, use console #2 to
    >> copying them to another machine. At the same time as you're logged into
    >> that same machine using console #5 so you can write/update a web page
    >> showing the latest screen shot, and then posting a link to it in this
    >> group using slrn over another ssh connection on console #6. :-)

    >
    >Well, write a script that looks in the directory where you will place
    >the scripts and then each time there is a new one upload it. That script
    >you place on a website and the do something like `wget
    >http://server/script.sh && sh script.sh`


    I didn't need to. I created the script and placed it in /home . Then, at
    the start of the installation, I mounted the old /home , copied it to
    the install system /root, umounted the old /home and started the script
    on the console. After that I just left it alone.

    >Obviously, the script will do what it needs to do in the background,


    Just use a while : ; do ... done loop.

    >sees that it runs itself after the reboot,


    That's the hard part. I just manually restarted it.


    >> AFAIK, someone did try porting it to Debian. Haven't heard much about
    >> that in a long while.

    >
    >http://yast4debian.alioth.debian.org/ and the fate on that is 20050424


    Doesn't appear much has happened in a long while :|

    >>>It is more then an installation tool.

    >>
    >> It still doesn't bring me hot cups of tea though.

    >
    >Tea is hard. At least for coffe there is an RFC you can use:
    >http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc2324.html


    You forgot the definitions in:



    Also, the automatic controller described here:



    >> There's nothing wrong with them being specific. All it takes is an hour
    >> or two every eight months to perform a new install, grab the new screen
    >> shots. The same again for an upgrade. Updating the pages would probably
    >> add another couple of hours, or so, for each one. It wouldn't need a
    >> complete rewrite as a lot could be carried over from a previous pages as
    >> a lot of the info would be generic anyway. It's not like YaST2 has had
    >> any radical changes in the last few years.

    >
    >So when is the page ready? ;-)


    Well, it took a little longer than I'd expected, but then again, I did
    it serially.


    >> Sounds familiar, although my example

    >
    >I was just talking from the top of my head, not taking a specific
    >example.


    Great minds think alike?

    >> was a bit of a bad one for someone
    >> who only has the one installation, as it was created using a system with
    >> a few other distributions installed and I had to make sure I picked the
    >> right on. For someone that has at least one other distribution/version
    >> installed, they're not likely to need the example.

    >
    >Well, that would need to be speciefied on the page as well, and perhaps
    >explained why they should NOT use the page.


    I thought about that. I moved it and replaced it with a simpler page
    showing the install using a single installation, rather than the
    multiple installations of the previous example.

    >> If they have more than the one Linux distribution, they're not going to
    >> be in need of a slide-show and beginners guide. If they are, I'd wonder
    >> just how they managed to install more than one distribution in the first
    >> place.

    >
    >Sometimes I wonder too. I tried helping someone in another group with
    >Ubuntu and as far as I understood, 2 openSUSE 10.3 installations. I was
    >unable to get any extra information about hard drive partitions, fstab
    >or menu.lst on either Ubuntu or openSUSE.


    You sure they performed the install themselves, not someone else
    installed them all for the user?

    >I realy wonderd how he was able to install at least 3 (wait, there was
    >some Windows as well, I believe) distributions and have no clue about
    >these things.


    Definitely sounds like someone else performed the install and left the
    user to play with each one to find out what they preferred.

    >> If anyone needs anything beyond that, e.g. making sure they don't format
    >> a partition belonging to another installation, or a data partition they
    >> set up outside /home, they're not going to be beginners and are more
    >> likely[0] to know what they're doing.

    >
    >My idea would be to make it very gereric from the start. e.g. how to
    >install a new openSUSE while maintaining one or more partitions.


    Done :-) It's presently on my wiki[1] but can be easily moved onto
    either the opensuse.org or the opensuse-community.org wiki.

    >Then you can say that the person needs to have at least one partition he
    >can afort to delete, Instead of screenshots, you could try out wink:
    >http://www.debugmode.com/wink/


    Either would work, if you're using a virtual machine.


    [0] Here is the sending script:

    #!/bin/bash

    mkdir -p "/root/yast2-screen-shots"

    pushd "/root/yast2-screen-shots"

    while :
    do
    SNAPSHOT_FILES=$(find -type f -name "*.png")
    if [ -z "${SNAPSHOT_FILES}" ]
    then
    sleep 20
    continue
    fi

    set -x
    for i in *.png
    do
    cat "${i}" >/dev/tcp/192.168.0.39/32000 && rm "${i}"
    sleep 5
    done
    set +x

    done

    exit 0

    And then the receiving "script":

    COUNTER="1"
    while :
    do
    FILENAME=$(printf "snapshot.%04u.png" "${COUNTER}")
    printf "%s\n" "${FILENAME}"
    netcat -lnp 32000 >"${FILENAME}"
    touch "${FILENAME}"
    COUNTER=$((${COUNTER}+1))
    sleep 2
    done

    [1]

    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit
    SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit |
    RISC OS 3.11 | RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC

  13. Re: New to Suse

    David Bolt wrote:
    > I didn't need to. I created the script and placed it in /home . Then, at
    > the start of the installation, I mounted the old /home , copied it to
    > the install system /root, umounted the old /home and started the script
    > on the console. After that I just left it alone.


    Huh? Why so much work?

    mount /dev/whatever_old_home /mnt && sh /mnt/script.sh
    No need to umount anything. You can then let the script first make a
    directoy /mnt/screenshots/Date_Time and symlink that to
    /root/YaST/screenshots (or wherever they will be taken)
    That way you save the files on a partition right away, instead of doing
    it to memory, like it does the befor the reboot.

    >>sees that it runs itself after the reboot,

    >
    > That's the hard part. I just manually restarted it.


    There is a parameter that is set that determines wether you need to
    start the rest of the instalation or not. There you could add the
    mounting and the script.

    > You sure they performed the install themselves, not someone else
    > installed them all for the user?


    Installations are so easy nowadays that I have no doubt that he was able
    to do it himself. Put in the CD and reboot is all that it takes. It is
    when people start to cahnge settings that things can go wrong.

    >>I realy wonderd how he was able to install at least 3 (wait, there was
    >>some Windows as well, I believe) distributions and have no clue about
    >>these things.

    >
    > Definitely sounds like someone else performed the install and left the
    > user to play with each one to find out what they preferred.


    Nah, that person would most likely not install two versions of openSUSE
    10.3.

    > [0] Here is the sending script:
    >
    > #!/bin/bash


    Do not unmount /mnt (I asume you are using that)

    > mkdir -p "/root/yast2-screen-shots"


    mkdir -p /mnt/yast2-screen-shots"
    ln -s /root/yast2-screen-shots /mnt/yast2-screen-shots

    or

    mkdir -p "/root/yast2-screen-shots"
    mount /dev/whatever /root/yast2-screen-shots

    > pushd "/root/yast2-screen-shots"


    Not needed, as you already use a directory that you won't format.

    Not sure if you at that point can mount NFS already, because that would
    make things even easier. You just mount anything to
    /root/yast2-screen-shots and you are done.

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  14. Re: New to Suse

    On Fri, 7 Dec 2007, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:
    >> I didn't need to. I created the script and placed it in /home . Then, at
    >> the start of the installation, I mounted the old /home , copied it to
    >> the install system /root, umounted the old /home and started the script
    >> on the console. After that I just left it alone.

    >
    >Huh? Why so much work?


    Because I'm bloody awkward? My wife says so, so it must be true. And
    wives are always right, even when they're wrong :|

    >mount /dev/whatever_old_home /mnt && sh /mnt/script.sh
    >No need to umount anything.


    Yes you do, or the install is likely to fail. YaST mounts the installed
    systems / on /mnt , and any other file systems get mounted under that.


    >> That's the hard part. I just manually restarted it.

    >
    >There is a parameter that is set that determines wether you need to
    >start the rest of the instalation or not. There you could add the
    >mounting and the script.


    I could, but I don't want to muck things up. It'd be easier to just add
    the mount to the installed systems /etc/fstab, so it's available as soon
    as the network is brought up, and then start the network as soon as it
    gets to asking the root password at the start of the second stage.

    >> You sure they performed the install themselves, not someone else
    >> installed them all for the user?

    >
    >Installations are so easy nowadays that I have no doubt that he was able
    >to do it himself. Put in the CD and reboot is all that it takes.


    More or less.

    >It is
    >when people start to cahnge settings that things can go wrong.


    It's them damn users again. If it wasn't for their mucking about... :/

    >> Definitely sounds like someone else performed the install and left the
    >> user to play with each one to find out what they preferred.

    >
    >Nah, that person would most likely not install two versions of openSUSE
    >10.3.


    True. Just goes to show how easy it is to install 10.3 then

    >> [0] Here is the sending script:
    >>
    >> #!/bin/bash

    >
    >Do not unmount /mnt (I asume you are using that)


    I was. I decided to try and use nfs to mount a partition under / , that
    way leaving /mnt free for the installation system. So, now the script is
    a lot shorter and reads:

    #!/bin/bash

    mkdir -p /nfs-mounts

    mount -t nfs 192.168.0.39:/local2 /nfs-mounts -o nolock || exit 1

    ln -s /nfs-mounts/screenshots /root/yast2-screen-shots

    exit 0

    >Not sure if you at that point can mount NFS already, because that would
    >make things even easier.


    You can but, with the root_squash option, you need to make the directory
    the files are saved in as world readable. And the files end up being
    owned by nobody.nogroup.

    >You just mount anything to
    >/root/yast2-screen-shots and you are done.


    That's another way. I'll try it next time I do an install. Should be
    just after alpha 1 comes out. I'd try it with alpha 0, but that's
    already being installed so it's a bit late now. Give it a short time and
    I'll see about adding the screen shots from the 11.0 alpha0 install.
    There's been a few more cosmetic changes again, just from looking at the
    installer.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit
    SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit |
    RISC OS 3.11 | RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC

  15. Re: New to Suse

    David Bolt wrote:
    > Yes you do, or the install is likely to fail. YaST mounts the installed
    > systems / on /mnt , and any other file systems get mounted under that.


    Mmm. The last time I took screenshots I did it that way. Well, could be
    I used an other directory, however I mounted somthing and unmounted
    nothing.

    > a lot shorter and reads:


    Shorter is good.

    > #!/bin/bash
    >
    > mkdir -p /nfs-mounts


    No need for the -p, as you are not making a subdirectory.

    > mount -t nfs 192.168.0.39:/local2 /nfs-mounts -o nolock || exit 1


    Does DNS work at that moment?

    > ln -s /nfs-mounts/screenshots /root/yast2-screen-shots


    I would most likely add a date and time stamp, so that screenshots do
    not get overwritten.

    > exit 0



    >>Not sure if you at that point can mount NFS already, because that would
    >>make things even easier.

    >
    > You can but, with the root_squash option, you need to make the directory
    > the files are saved in as world readable. And the files end up being
    > owned by nobody.nogroup.


    That is not very neat, but also not very problematic.

    > There's been a few more cosmetic changes again, just from looking at the
    > installer.


    And anything else?

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  16. Re: New to Suse

    On Fri, 7 Dec 2007, houghi wrote:-

    >David Bolt wrote:
    >> Yes you do, or the install is likely to fail. YaST mounts the installed
    >> systems / on /mnt , and any other file systems get mounted under that.

    >
    >Mmm. The last time I took screenshots I did it that way. Well, could be
    >I used an other directory, however I mounted somthing and unmounted
    >nothing.


    I'll try it out next time. If it breaks something, it's being put on a
    VM for testing so no harm done.

    >> a lot shorter and reads:

    >
    >Shorter is good.


    In some cases, and this one is one of them.

    >> #!/bin/bash
    >>
    >> mkdir -p /nfs-mounts

    >
    >No need for the -p, as you are not making a subdirectory.


    It's a habit I have, plus mkdir doesn't throw up an error if the
    directory already exists.

    >> mount -t nfs 192.168.0.39:/local2 /nfs-mounts -o nolock || exit 1

    >
    >Does DNS work at that moment?


    I don't know. The first mount used the domain name and seemed to hang
    for a while. Using the IP address instead resulted in an almost
    instantaneous mount.

    >> ln -s /nfs-mounts/screenshots /root/yast2-screen-shots

    >
    >I would most likely add a date and time stamp, so that screenshots do
    >not get overwritten.


    Probably a good idea. The second stage screenshots had to be renamed or
    they'd have overwritten the first stage images. Either that or I add
    another couple of commands to the script, and modify the ln as such:

    DATE=$(date +%s)
    mkdir -p /nfs-mounts/screenshots/${DATE}
    ln -s /nfs-mounts/screenshots/${DATE} /root/yast2-screen-shots


    >> exit 0

    >
    >
    >>>Not sure if you at that point can mount NFS already, because that would
    >>>make things even easier.

    >>
    >> You can but, with the root_squash option, you need to make the directory
    >> the files are saved in as world readable. And the files end up being
    >> owned by nobody.nogroup.

    >
    >That is not very neat, but also not very problematic.


    Not really a problem at all, although it would have been nicer to not
    need the directory world-writable, and the ownership was sorted with a
    quick use of sudo chown.

    >> There's been a few more cosmetic changes again, just from looking at the
    >> installer.

    >
    >And anything else?


    Yes. As a cosmetic change, the bouncy icons used for feedback when
    starting an application has a shadow underneath it.

    Other changes are that the default KDE install has jumped another 200MB
    to 2.4GB. One known bug/problem is that it goes to the old text
    installer and throws up an error at the end of the installation.

    There's a warning displayed during the network configuration that
    encryption isn't used despite there being no wireless network card
    installed. I think I'll add a bug report about that.

    Another known problem is that the links on the installation summary,
    network configuration and hardware pages don't work. You need to use the
    "Change..." button at the bottom.

    I don't recall seeing a warning being displayed on the 10.3 desktop
    after the first login saying the system is going to be slower than usual
    because Beagle is doing its thing, so this could be a change as well.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit
    SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit |
    RISC OS 3.11 | RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC

  17. Re: New to Suse

    On Fri, 7 Dec 2007, in a serious breach of netiquette, David Bolt did
    perform the act of a self-followup:-



    Finished the installation and write-up, and you can see the results
    here:





    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit
    SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit |
    RISC OS 3.11 | RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC

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