Automount stop working. Fails to start - Suse

This is a discussion on Automount stop working. Fails to start - Suse ; Open Suse 10.3 I had automount problem before when accidentally leaves my USB key plugged in before shutdown. I usually get the problem fixed by add a blank line at the end of fstab. This time, I am not sure ...

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Thread: Automount stop working. Fails to start

  1. Automount stop working. Fails to start

    Open Suse 10.3

    I had automount problem before when accidentally leaves my USB key
    plugged in before shutdown. I usually get the problem fixed by add a
    blank line at the end of fstab.

    This time, I am not sure because I accidentally left the USB printer
    cord plugged in, the computer won't starts KDE because automount
    fails. I can login and startx manually. Here's the error message
    (not exact, just some text from it):

    Starting automount /user/sbin/automount failed. Kernel protocol
    version 5.00 or above required.

    I have no idea how to fix this problem. Please help.

  2. Re: Automount stop working. Fails to start

    On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 10:16:32 -0800, vd wrote:

    > Open Suse 10.3
    > Starting automount /user/sbin/automount failed. Kernel protocol
    > version 5.00 or above required.


    I am not sure is it related, but on SUSE autofs requires
    DBUS, HAL and PolicyKit services running. Check, if you would,
    for messages related to them.

    All services mentioned shoul be started in your default runlevel,
    probably 3 or 5.

    DG

  3. Re: Automount stop working. Fails to start

    I got the DBUS and HAL running. I am not sure how to check the
    PolicyKit. I am still confused how it stops working suddenly though.
    I update the system often for security. I wonder if the last one
    caused it.


  4. Re: Automount stop working. Fails to start


    Looking around, I found that I can't write to /tmp.
    In /tmp, there are about 32000 directory. Mostly YaST2*.

    Delete all these directories fixed the problem. The error for this
    problem is really cryptic and doesn't seem to say anything about the
    cause of the problem.

    I think this relates to some infinite loop problem with the Yast
    update program mentioned lately in Suse update.

    For new users, I am not sure how they can solve this. For newbies
    whole have a similar problem, check your /tmp directory. Login as root
    (using "su" command), and run this script (put it a file first) in
    the /tmp directory:

    #!/bin/sh

    for i in `ls`
    do
    afile=`expr substr $i 1 5`
    if [ "$afile" == "YaST2" ]; then
    echo $i
    rm -rf $i
    fi
    done

  5. Re: Automount stop working. Fails to start

    On Tue, 27 Nov 2007, vd wrote:-



    >For new users, I am not sure how they can solve this. For newbies
    >whole have a similar problem, check your /tmp directory. Login as root
    >(using "su" command), and run this script (put it a file first) in
    >the /tmp directory:
    >
    >#!/bin/sh
    >
    >for i in `ls`
    >do
    >afile=`expr substr $i 1 5`
    >if [ "$afile" == "YaST2" ]; then
    >echo $i
    >rm -rf $i
    >fi
    >done


    Want a one-liner that performs the same action, doesn't need to be a
    script, and works from any directory? Try this:

    find /tmp -maxdepth 1 -type d -name "YaST2*" -print0 | xargs rm -rf

    And if you're wanting to see what's there, add a 'v' to the -rf and rm
    will tell you just what's being deleted.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    www.davjam.org/lifetype/ www.distributed.net: OGR@100Mnodes, RC5-72@15Mkeys
    | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit
    SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit |
    RISC OS 3.11 | RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC

  6. Re: Automount stop working. Fails to start

    David Bolt wrote:
    > Want a one-liner that performs the same action, doesn't need to be a
    > script, and works from any directory? Try this:
    >
    > find /tmp -maxdepth 1 -type d -name "YaST2*" -print0 | xargs rm -rf
    >
    > And if you're wanting to see what's there, add a 'v' to the -rf and rm
    > will tell you just what's being deleted.


    You will need to be root, so if you type / instead of /tmp, the -v will
    caus a lot of DOH!'s. So as user you can start it with `sudo find ...`

    I would do
    find /tmp -maxdepth 1 -type d -name "YaST2*" -exec rm '{}' -rf \;

    I know there are some disadvantages, apparently, but I never have
    encounterd them and I always forget how xargs is written. :-D

    houghi
    --
    Remind me to write an article on the compulsive reading of news. The
    theme will be that most neuroses can be traced to the unhealthy habit
    of wallowing in the troubles of five billion strangers. -- Heinlein

  7. Re: Automount stop working. Fails to start

    vd in :

    > For new users, I am not sure how they can solve this. For newbies
    > whole have a similar problem, check your /tmp directory. Login as root
    > (using "su" command), and run this script (put it a file first) in
    > the /tmp directory:


    For me the ordinairy suse.de-clean-tmp in the cron.daily directory works
    fine.
    You have to set it in /etc/sysconfig/cron.

    # cron.daily can check for old files in tmp-dirs. It will delete all files
    # not accessed for more than MAX_DAYS_IN_TMP. If MAX_DAYS_IN_TMP is not set
    # or set to 0, this feature will be disabled.

    I always set this one:
    CLEAR_TMP_DIRS_AT_BOOTUP="yes"

    P.


    --
    mailtoeter@dharma.dyn-o-saur.com

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