Weird Firefox behavior on 10.3 - Suse

This is a discussion on Weird Firefox behavior on 10.3 - Suse ; I have been running OpenSuse 10.3 since it came out, and so far so good, this is definitely the best version yet. I was able to get multimedia working with a few clicks and I was a happy camper. Then ...

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Thread: Weird Firefox behavior on 10.3

  1. Weird Firefox behavior on 10.3


    I have been running OpenSuse 10.3 since it came out, and so far so
    good, this is definitely the best version yet. I was able to get
    multimedia working with a few clicks and I was a happy camper.

    Then today I did the following - it must be a Bad Thing. I may be off
    slightly as to the sequence of some of the actions.

    1. Started up a desktop as me (non-root). I believe Firefox was open.
    2. Started up a root session without closing the above session.
    3. While in the root session I made a few minor changes in root's
    firefox configuration, all in the appearance area.
    4. Closed the root session.
    5. Reopened the user session and closed Firefox.
    6. Reopened Firefox.

    Then the fun began. Running Firefox as a non-root user now works only
    intermittently, usually works the first time only, sometimes works after
    that but only once. Click on the icon, it shows up and immediately (I
    have fairly fast hardware) disappears.

    Clues.

    Syslog shows (sometimes) the following messages when I try and run Fox:
    Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.mandatory" to a read-only
    configuration source at position 0
    Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    "xml:readwrite:/home/jim/.gconf" to a writable configuration source at
    position 1
    Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.defaults" to a read-only
    configuration source at position 2
    Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.schemas" to a read-only configuration
    source at position 3
    Nov 17 21:45:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): GConf server is not in use,
    shutting down.

    The object listed there are folders, I tried chown +w on them, did not
    help.

    Other logs show nothing helpful

    Running Firefox as root works fine.

    It sure looks like a permission problem to me, I must have upset
    something when I ran Fox as root, but what? Anybody seen this?

    TIA for any ideas, this one is odd...


  2. Re: Weird Firefox behavior on 10.3

    jim wrote:

    >
    > I have been running OpenSuse 10.3 since it came out, and so far so
    > good, this is definitely the best version yet. I was able to get
    > multimedia working with a few clicks and I was a happy camper.
    >
    > Then today I did the following - it must be a Bad Thing. I may be off
    > slightly as to the sequence of some of the actions.
    >
    > 1. Started up a desktop as me (non-root). I believe Firefox was open.
    > 2. Started up a root session without closing the above session.
    > 3. While in the root session I made a few minor changes in root's
    > firefox configuration, all in the appearance area.
    > 4. Closed the root session.
    > 5. Reopened the user session and closed Firefox.
    > 6. Reopened Firefox.
    >
    > Then the fun began. Running Firefox as a non-root user now works only
    > intermittently, usually works the first time only, sometimes works after
    > that but only once. Click on the icon, it shows up and immediately (I
    > have fairly fast hardware) disappears.
    >
    > Clues.
    >
    > Syslog shows (sometimes) the following messages when I try and run Fox:
    > Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    > "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.mandatory" to a read-only
    > configuration source at position 0
    > Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    > "xml:readwrite:/home/jim/.gconf" to a writable configuration source at
    > position 1
    > Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    > "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.defaults" to a read-only
    > configuration source at position 2
    > Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    > "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.schemas" to a read-only configuration
    > source at position 3
    > Nov 17 21:45:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): GConf server is not in use,
    > shutting down.
    >
    > The object listed there are folders, I tried chown +w on them, did not
    > help.


    I would read man before applying command Jim.

    In this case 'chown' has no clue what is '+w', but in some other case it can
    happen to set your system in unpredictable way that can be time consuming
    to troubleshoot.

    > Other logs show nothing helpful
    >
    > Running Firefox as root works fine.
    >
    > It sure looks like a permission problem to me, I must have upset
    > something when I ran Fox as root, but what? Anybody seen this?
    >
    > TIA for any ideas, this one is odd...


    Did somebody mentioned that running GUI as root is not good idea?
    I guess yes, many times, so many that is boring to repeat it.
    One of reasons listed is that GUI is more complex and contains more bugs
    that have smaller effect if user running GUI has limited ability to goof
    the system.

    To test is it ownership problem in your home directory try first as normal
    user:
    cd
    this will bring you in your home directory

    mv .mozilla .mozilla-sav
    and start Firefox.

    To see what files are changed you can run Midnight Commander and use compare
    directories function, or simple:
    l -R .mozilla
    and in another console
    l -R .mozilla-sav
    and compare outputs.

    If you see ownership changes than use chown, but run it as root (normal user
    can't change ownership of files created by root). It should look like:

    chown -R :users /home//*

    is usually called user name, but I like to use this as user name
    in documentation is real user name, not login name

    --
    Regards,
    Rajko.

  3. Re: Weird Firefox behavior on 10.3

    Rajko M. wrote:

    Jim wrote:
    Thanks for the help, changing the folder fixed the problem and led me to
    the solution, see below.


    > jim wrote:
    >
    >> I have been running OpenSuse 10.3 since it came out, and so far so
    >> good, this is definitely the best version yet. I was able to get
    >> multimedia working with a few clicks and I was a happy camper.
    >>
    >> Then today I did the following - it must be a Bad Thing. I may be off
    >> slightly as to the sequence of some of the actions.
    >>
    >> 1. Started up a desktop as me (non-root). I believe Firefox was open.
    >> 2. Started up a root session without closing the above session.
    >> 3. While in the root session I made a few minor changes in root's
    >> firefox configuration, all in the appearance area.
    >> 4. Closed the root session.
    >> 5. Reopened the user session and closed Firefox.
    >> 6. Reopened Firefox.
    >>
    >> Then the fun began. Running Firefox as a non-root user now works only
    >> intermittently, usually works the first time only, sometimes works after
    >> that but only once. Click on the icon, it shows up and immediately (I
    >> have fairly fast hardware) disappears.
    >>
    >> Clues.
    >>
    >> Syslog shows (sometimes) the following messages when I try and run Fox:
    >> Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    >> "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.mandatory" to a read-only
    >> configuration source at position 0
    >> Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    >> "xml:readwrite:/home/jim/.gconf" to a writable configuration source at
    >> position 1
    >> Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    >> "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.defaults" to a read-only
    >> configuration source at position 2
    >> Nov 17 21:40:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): Resolved address
    >> "xml:readonly:/etc/gconf/gconf.xml.schemas" to a read-only configuration
    >> source at position 3
    >> Nov 17 21:45:08 NEW64 gconfd (jim-4678): GConf server is not in use,
    >> shutting down.
    >>
    >> The object listed there are folders, I tried chown +w on them, did not
    >> help.

    >
    > I would read man before applying command Jim.


    Sorry my bad, meant to say chmod, not chown
    >
    > In this case 'chown' has no clue what is '+w', but in some other case it can
    > happen to set your system in unpredictable way that can be time consuming
    > to troubleshoot.
    >
    >> Other logs show nothing helpful
    >>
    >> Running Firefox as root works fine.
    >>
    >> It sure looks like a permission problem to me, I must have upset
    >> something when I ran Fox as root, but what? Anybody seen this?
    >>
    >> TIA for any ideas, this one is odd...

    >
    > Did somebody mentioned that running GUI as root is not good idea?


    I am aware of the problems and do not normally run a GUI as root, I was
    just configuring Fox so that I could if I had to.

    > I guess yes, many times, so many that is boring to repeat it.
    > One of reasons listed is that GUI is more complex and contains more bugs
    > that have smaller effect if user running GUI has limited ability to goof
    > the system.
    >
    > To test is it ownership problem in your home directory try first as normal
    > user:
    > cd
    > this will bring you in your home directory
    >
    > mv .mozilla .mozilla-sav
    > and start Firefox.
    >


    This seems to fix it. Actually the real problem was
    that the Fox skin I am using is bad, trying to run Fox from command line
    gets this:


    jim@NEW64:~> firefox
    /usr/bin/firefox: line 208: 5202 Segmentation fault $MOZ_PROGRAM "$@"

    Moral of story - bad skins hurt Fox...


    > To see what files are changed you can run Midnight Commander and use compare
    > directories function, or simple:
    > l -R .mozilla
    > and in another console
    > l -R .mozilla-sav
    > and compare outputs.
    >
    > If you see ownership changes than use chown, but run it as root (normal user
    > can't change ownership of files created by root). It should look like:
    >
    > chown -R :users /home//*
    >
    > is usually called user name, but I like to use this as user name
    > in documentation is real user name, not login name
    >




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