Kernel build mechanism in openSUSE 10.3 - Suse

This is a discussion on Kernel build mechanism in openSUSE 10.3 - Suse ; I didn't look to deep into it (only came around installing 10.3 in a VM yesterday to see if it's worth the upgrade before it goes to my real machine; looks very, very good so far), but is it still ...

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Thread: Kernel build mechanism in openSUSE 10.3

  1. Kernel build mechanism in openSUSE 10.3

    I didn't look to deep into it (only came around installing 10.3 in a VM
    yesterday to see if it's worth the upgrade before it goes to my real
    machine; looks very, very good so far), but is it still the case that
    after a "make cloneconfig" of the default kernel and after a "make" one
    obtains an exact same kernel as the one's that's running? As many
    others, I simply want to change optimization flags and target CPU, with
    all the rest (autoloading of modules and managing them in YaST) is still
    100% working.

    Logic tells me "yes", but I thought I'll ask first.

  2. Re: Kernel build mechanism in openSUSE 10.3

    Nikos Chantziaras wrote:

    > I didn't look to deep into it (only came around installing 10.3 in a VM
    > yesterday to see if it's worth the upgrade before it goes to my real
    > machine; looks very, very good so far), but is it still the case that
    > after a "make cloneconfig" of the default kernel and after a "make" one
    > obtains an exact same kernel as the one's that's running? As many
    > others, I simply want to change optimization flags and target CPU, with
    > all the rest (autoloading of modules and managing them in YaST) is still
    > 100% working.
    >
    > Logic tells me "yes", but I thought I'll ask first.


    Yup, you are right. That's how got started tweaking the kernel for my
    machine. After cloneconfig, I did "make xconfig". Then I turned off
    Optimise for size and set the Hz to 1000. You can go as far as making the
    kernel for your specific processor. Check the Processor section.

    After you are done with xconfig, do "make", if there are no errors which I
    would be surprised if there were, you simple do "make modules_install"
    followed by "make install". Grub will be automagically updated with a new
    entry.

    To uninstall previous custom kernels, you will need to remove the
    corresponding files from /boot and the compiled modules
    from /lib/modules/ and then you will
    need to manually edit /boot/grub/menu.lst and remove the offending entry.

    After you do this a couple of times, you will find yourself doing all this
    practically automatically.

    --
    Chris

  3. Re: Kernel build mechanism in openSUSE 10.3

    Chris wrote:
    > Nikos Chantziaras wrote:
    >> [...] is it still the case that
    >> after a "make cloneconfig" of the default kernel and after a "make" one
    >> obtains an exact same kernel as the one's that's running? As many
    >> others, I simply want to change optimization flags and target CPU, with
    >> all the rest (autoloading of modules and managing them in YaST) is still
    >> 100% working.

    >
    > Yup, you are right. That's how got started tweaking the kernel for my
    > machine. After cloneconfig, I did "make xconfig". Then I turned off
    > Optimise for size and set the Hz to 1000. You can go as far as making the
    > kernel for your specific processor. Check the Processor section.


    Surprised to find a "Core2" entry in there, but probably it doesn't even
    work since that's GCC 4.3, not 4.2 (and indeed, -mtune=generic was
    used; for x86_64 that is).

    Compile took a while (only have 1 core assigned to the VM). I had to
    disable the squashfs filesystem though, as it refused to compile. (But
    who cares about that one anyway.)

    Meanwhile, 10.3 is on my real machine and I build the kernel there too.

    Now I only wish the whole system wouldn't crash when trying to do 3D
    after installing the ATi drivers from the ATi repository :P glxgears
    works, but everything else doesn't. Even some 2D functions are very
    slow (selecting a region on the desktop slows to a crawl when the
    rectangle becomes about half the size of the screen). And the "Linux
    catalyst control center" is so bugged it won't even start ("can't find X
    server", lol).

    Still better than 10.2 though, which wouldn't even start when using the
    ATi drivers and I was tied to using the VESA driver. (I'm on a X1950XT,
    btw).

    ATi: just broke it's own negative record on incredibly ****ty software
    quality.

    PS:
    I tried Kubuntu 7.10 btw, and everything works 100% there, so they got
    that part better than openSUSE.

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