Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow) - Suse

This is a discussion on Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow) - Suse ; Vahis wrote: > I wonder what will happen the next time there is a kernel patch available. Nothing. As with all software. Either you let openSUSE handle it, or you handle it. The kernel yu run now isn't the concern ...

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Thread: Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow)

  1. Re: Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow)

    Vahis wrote:
    > I wonder what will happen the next time there is a kernel patch available.


    Nothing. As with all software. Either you let openSUSE handle it, or you
    handle it. The kernel yu run now isn't the concern of openSUSE anymore.

    Be glad that it is that way. Imagine that you have edited the kernel in
    such a way that a certain part had changed sourcecode. The reason might
    be that it doesn't run your specific hardware otherwise.

    Now imagine that just that part is updated. You get the update and now
    your software does not work anymore.

    The same goes for any software. Once you compiled it yourself, YOU are
    responsible for updates and not YOU. ;-)

    houghi
    --
    >>>> Run the following from the bashprompt if you have the kernel sources

    for I in `find /usr/src/linux/ -name *.c`; \
    do A=`grep -i -A 1 -B 1 **** $I`;if [ "$A" != "" ]; \
    then printf "$I \n$A \n\n"; fi ;done|less

  2. Re: Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow)

    houghi wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >> I wonder what will happen the next time there is a kernel patch available.

    >
    > Nothing. As with all software. Either you let openSUSE handle it, or you
    > handle it. The kernel yu run now isn't the concern of openSUSE anymore.
    >
    > Be glad that it is that way. Imagine that you have edited the kernel in
    > such a way that a certain part had changed sourcecode. The reason might
    > be that it doesn't run your specific hardware otherwise.
    >
    > Now imagine that just that part is updated. You get the update and now
    > your software does not work anymore.
    >
    > The same goes for any software. Once you compiled it yourself, YOU are
    > responsible for updates and not YOU. ;-)
    >
    > houghi


    Next time when I will see a kernel update available I can of course
    install that with YaST. Then I'm back on the openSUSE default kernel.

    I could go back right now by just installing the kernel and sources from
    the main tree, too.

    This was encouraging, though. I know now that some time in the future I
    will have another trick to try in case of some jazz I can't fix in any
    other way.

    Vahis
    --
    See, mom, I'm running my own kernel!

  3. Re: Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow)

    houghi wrote:
    >> And besides, using Linux without ever having build the kernel by
    >> yourself is lame

    >
    > Oh, I have build kernels. I just never had a working one. :-D


    I just downloaded the Intel C++ 10.1 compiler directly from Intel (they
    provide it free of charge for non-commercial use; free beer). I will
    try to build the kernel with that one as benchmarks claim it produces
    30% faster code compared to GCC (and GCC 4.2 doesn't even target Intel
    Core 2)...

    Yes, I am crazy ;P

  4. Re: Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow)

    On Wed, 7 Nov 2007 08:18:47 +0100, houghi wrote:

    >Nikos Chantziaras wrote:
    >> Btw, this assumes that all machines use the same type of CPU (all of
    >> them P4, all of them Core 2, etc.) If not, you will have to configure
    >> the kernel for a "generic" CPU, or take the time and compile the kernel
    >> on each machine individually.

    >
    >Hey, perhaps that is why openSUSE has such a 'slow' kernel. Because they
    >have to think about each and every situation. :-D
    >
    >houghi


    Indeed that is the case.
    Perhaps that's why they prefer CONFIG_HZ=250 for slower CPUs.
    And CONFIG_CC_OPTIMIZE_FOR_SIZE=y for ones with small hard disks.
    And CONFIG_DEBUG_KERNEL=y for those who would like to debug the kernel and send
    bug reports?

    I am working on building a custom rpm a la SUSE, so I got these files:
    kernel-default-2.6.22.9-0.4.nosrc.rpm
    kernel-source-2.6.22.9-0.4.src.rpm
    (latest sources from the update repository) and trying to figure out
    how to best patch the included config files. I think I have a clue.
    This will solve the problem of clean installation/removal, later upgrades,
    having multiple kernels installed and installing in lots of (similar) machines
    without recompiling again.

    I'll keep you posted in case any one is interested.

  5. Re: Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow)

    Christos Gourdoupis wrote:
    > On Wed, 7 Nov 2007 08:18:47 +0100, houghi wrote:
    >
    >> Nikos Chantziaras wrote:
    >>> Btw, this assumes that all machines use the same type of CPU (all of
    >>> them P4, all of them Core 2, etc.) If not, you will have to configure
    >>> the kernel for a "generic" CPU, or take the time and compile the kernel
    >>> on each machine individually.

    >> Hey, perhaps that is why openSUSE has such a 'slow' kernel. Because they
    >> have to think about each and every situation. :-D
    >>
    >> houghi

    >
    > Indeed that is the case.
    > Perhaps that's why they prefer CONFIG_HZ=250 for slower CPUs.


    Actually that ones depends on what you do. If you're not into stuff
    that requires very exact timing (realtime 3D games, multimedia
    authoring), even 100Hz is a fine value. 100 has been used for ages as
    default before Linus switched to 1000 (and later to 250).


    > And CONFIG_CC_OPTIMIZE_FOR_SIZE=y for ones with small hard disks.


    We're talking about a difference of maybe 500kB for the kernel, and
    maybe 5MB for all the modules, so that doesn't sound like a good reason :P


    > And CONFIG_DEBUG_KERNEL=y for those who would like to debug the kernel and send
    > bug reports?


    I think this one has a different purpose; could be that openSUSE needs
    some of the debug interfaces/backdoors/hooks into the kernel to monitor
    stuff? (I disabled all debug switches with and didn't notice any error
    messages in the logs, btw.)

  6. Re: Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow)

    houghi wrote:
    > Vahis wrote:
    >> I wonder what will happen the next time there is a kernel patch available.

    >
    > Nothing. As with all software. Either you let openSUSE handle it, or you
    > handle it. The kernel yu run now isn't the concern of openSUSE anymore.
    >
    > Be glad that it is that way. Imagine that you have edited the kernel in
    > such a way that a certain part had changed sourcecode. The reason might
    > be that it doesn't run your specific hardware otherwise.
    >
    > Now imagine that just that part is updated. You get the update and now
    > your software does not work anymore.
    >
    > The same goes for any software. Once you compiled it yourself, YOU are
    > responsible for updates and not YOU. ;-)


    Good post, but wrong.

    The updater is updating and replacing my custom built kernel as I'm
    writing this. As I suspected, the full thing is downloaded since deltas
    aren't applicable, and installed over the current one, deleting any
    trace of the old kernel (including deletion of the whole
    /lib/modules-version and /usr/src/linux-version directories).

  7. Re: Watch out for 10.3 kernel (slow)

    Vahis wrote:
    > houghi wrote:
    >> Vahis wrote:
    >>> I wonder what will happen the next time there is a kernel patch available.

    >> Nothing. As with all software. Either you let openSUSE handle it, or you
    >> handle it. The kernel yu run now isn't the concern of openSUSE anymore.
    >>
    >> Be glad that it is that way. Imagine that you have edited the kernel in
    >> such a way that a certain part had changed sourcecode. The reason might
    >> be that it doesn't run your specific hardware otherwise.
    >>
    >> Now imagine that just that part is updated. You get the update and now
    >> your software does not work anymore.
    >>
    >> The same goes for any software. Once you compiled it yourself, YOU are
    >> responsible for updates and not YOU. ;-)
    >>
    >> houghi

    >
    > Next time when I will see a kernel update available I can of course
    > install that with YaST. Then I'm back on the openSUSE default kernel.


    That happened sooner than I expected

    >
    > I could go back right now by just installing the kernel and sources from
    > the main tree, too.
    >
    > This was encouraging, though. I know now that some time in the future I
    > will have another trick to try in case of some jazz I can't fix in any
    > other way.


    I added a hard disk while I was running my own kernel.

    YaST Partitioner failed in formatting it.

    Then the new kernel version just happened to show up in the updates

    I installed it.

    The partitioner worked like charm, as it always had before

    I'll stick with the official kernels from now on.

    Vahis
    --
    "Only wimps use tape backup: _real_ men just upload their important
    stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it "
    Linus Torvalds 1996.

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