Laptop has 4 Primary partitions in Vista, where does SuSe go? - Suse

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Thread: Laptop has 4 Primary partitions in Vista, where does SuSe go?

  1. Laptop has 4 Primary partitions in Vista, where does SuSe go?


    A Toshiba p200 Satellite RT5 laptop with a single 150 Gb has
    four primary partitions under the default Vista.

    SDA1 Volume label Toshiba System Volume
    Type NTFS (0x27)
    Start sector 2048
    Size 1.4 Gb
    Cyl 0 to 191
    C:
    SDA2 Volume Label S3A6423233
    D:
    Type NTFS (0x7)
    Start sector 3074048
    Size 133 Gb
    Cyl 191-17639
    SDA3
    E:?
    Type NTFS (0x7)
    Start SEctor 283371520
    Size 7 Gb
    Cyl 17639-18590
    SDA4 Volume Label: HDD recovery
    Type HIddten HPFS/NTFS 0x17
    Start Sector 298655740
    Size 6Gb
    Cyl 18590-19457

    Now I can squeeze SDA2 down in Vista to half,
    leaving unallocated space.
    But this space can't be formatted for Suse Linux
    as it says that I can only have 4 Primaries.
    And here I thought that I could create a logical
    extension for Linux.

    I need to go to Windows once in a while, and some
    of the features of this laptop might only be on the
    windows side.

    So, ... do I kill one partition, such as the HDD Recovery,
    SDA4, but somehow leave the space empty, thus "freeing" a
    Primary partition?
    I've done the initial laptop Create Recovery Disks
    thing which took 2 DVDs (about 6 Gb) which should replace
    it when needed.
    I gather that Vista is always making up a series of CD
    zized images of itself for recovery from a certain state.

    So / root, /home, /Swap will take up more partitions, though
    once I have cut, squeezed, chopped the 133Gb in half for
    this Linux install (i'll be adding eCs, the modern OS/2
    sucessor later), they should take or will they need an
    apparent Primary partition also.
    The recovery disks seem to be Norton Ghost images to
    restore the HDD parition and the complete image of the
    remaining Windows Gigabytes of basic stuff in Vista Home.

    Maybe there is a better way to restore the Windows part
    by DVD/CD that would obviate the need for these three
    extra-partions.



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  2. Re: Laptop has 4 Primary partitions in Vista, where does SuSe go?

    On 2007-10-17 11:10, dan say wrote:
    > A Toshiba p200 Satellite RT5 laptop with a single 150 Gb has
    > four primary partitions under the default Vista.
    >
    > SDA1 Volume label Toshiba System Volume
    > Type NTFS (0x27)
    > Start sector 2048
    > Size 1.4 Gb
    > Cyl 0 to 191
    > C:
    > SDA2 Volume Label S3A6423233
    > D:
    > Type NTFS (0x7)
    > Start sector 3074048
    > Size 133 Gb
    > Cyl 191-17639
    > SDA3
    > E:?
    > Type NTFS (0x7)
    > Start SEctor 283371520
    > Size 7 Gb
    > Cyl 17639-18590
    > SDA4 Volume Label: HDD recovery
    > Type HIddten HPFS/NTFS 0x17
    > Start Sector 298655740
    > Size 6Gb
    > Cyl 18590-19457
    >
    > Now I can squeeze SDA2 down in Vista to half,
    > leaving unallocated space.
    > But this space can't be formatted for Suse Linux
    > as it says that I can only have 4 Primaries.
    > And here I thought that I could create a logical
    > extension for Linux.
    >
    > I need to go to Windows once in a while, and some
    > of the features of this laptop might only be on the
    > windows side.
    >
    > So, ... do I kill one partition, such as the HDD Recovery,
    > SDA4, but somehow leave the space empty, thus "freeing" a
    > Primary partition?
    > I've done the initial laptop Create Recovery Disks
    > thing which took 2 DVDs (about 6 Gb) which should replace
    > it when needed.
    > I gather that Vista is always making up a series of CD
    > zized images of itself for recovery from a certain state.
    >
    > So / root, /home, /Swap will take up more partitions, though
    > once I have cut, squeezed, chopped the 133Gb in half for
    > this Linux install (i'll be adding eCs, the modern OS/2
    > sucessor later), they should take or will they need an
    > apparent Primary partition also.
    > The recovery disks seem to be Norton Ghost images to
    > restore the HDD parition and the complete image of the
    > remaining Windows Gigabytes of basic stuff in Vista Home.
    >
    > Maybe there is a better way to restore the Windows part
    > by DVD/CD that would obviate the need for these three
    > extra-partions.
    >
    >
    >


    Yes, if you need to boot windows, your partition table must be Microsoft
    compatible, and that will give you max 4 primary partitions.

    Add an external USB disk , a 500GB don't cost much today.
    Download the rescue CD .
    http://partimage.org/Main_Page , follow the link to System RescueCd Homepage.

    Boot it and format your external USB disk ( fdisk /dev/sdb )
    create one linux partition sdb1. Make a filesystem mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1
    (not vfat)

    Then mkdir /mnt/backup : mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/backup
    then run partimage
    Do backup of all your partitions

    When you have a backup of your partitions, save the output
    from fdisk -l /dev/sda , and halt the machine, and remove your usb disk.
    Boot windows , and defrag, reduce D: , leaving enough with free space.

    Boot the rescue CD again
    and, mkdir /mnt/backup , and mount your usb disk again , and cd to it.
    do ls -l to verify you have your backups, so you didn't do any mistake.

    use fdisk /dev/sda
    remove sda4 , sda3
    make a new extended partition 3
    then create 2 partitions, with the same numbers of blocks as the saved output
    (answer +numberofblocks) from fdisk -l
    Use T to toggle type 7

    Make one partition 1G I guess ( answer +1G as endblock),
    and change to type 82 (swap)
    And then make another one with all remaining blocks and
    set type 83

    use p to see the table
    w to save it
    now your swap should be sda6 and the linux partition sda7

    Try mkswap /dev/sda6
    (that will help when you start the install.)

    Do ls -l , write down the names of your backups.
    ..000 is added to the name you gave.

    Start partimage, and restore your old sda3 to the new sda4 ,
    but DO NOT restore the old partition table and MBR.

    If you like, you can also restore the recovery old sda4 to the new sda5 ,
    but booting in recovery will make it all undone, so you can keep it as
    an image and restore if you need it later.

    If you boot now, windows should see it's partitions as before, but smaller sda2.
    Now suse should find the swap sda6, and use it during the install, and suggest
    using sda7 as / , if not, tell it.
    You don't need a /home on that small disk, and remember, the disk is almost
    100% faster on the first cylinder (where windows are) then the last where Linux are.
    You should get another disk if possible.

    And, btw. everything I write can be outdated, if suse's rescue boot has better
    tools, things are changing fast, and sometimes I do the old obsoleted way :-)

    /bb

  3. Re: Laptop has 4 Primary partitions in Vista, where does SuSe go?

    dan say wrote:
    > A Toshiba p200 Satellite RT5 laptop with a single 150 Gb has
    > four primary partitions under the default Vista.


    Did Toshiba use up all of the primary paritions, or did you?
    You need to remember to make the final primary partition into
    an extended partition if you plan on having more than 4
    partitions on a host.

    If Tohsiba did this... shame on them.... but typical...

    You may have to do some backups or use a re-partitioning
    tool (and backup ANYWAY!!).


    >
    > SDA1 Volume label Toshiba System Volume
    > Type NTFS (0x27)
    > Start sector 2048
    > Size 1.4 Gb
    > Cyl 0 to 191
    > C:
    > SDA2 Volume Label S3A6423233
    > D:
    > Type NTFS (0x7)
    > Start sector 3074048
    > Size 133 Gb
    > Cyl 191-17639
    > SDA3
    > E:?
    > Type NTFS (0x7)
    > Start SEctor 283371520
    > Size 7 Gb
    > Cyl 17639-18590
    > SDA4 Volume Label: HDD recovery
    > Type HIddten HPFS/NTFS 0x17
    > Start Sector 298655740
    > Size 6Gb
    > Cyl 18590-19457
    >
    > Now I can squeeze SDA2 down in Vista to half,
    > leaving unallocated space.
    > But this space can't be formatted for Suse Linux
    > as it says that I can only have 4 Primaries.
    > And here I thought that I could create a logical
    > extension for Linux.
    >
    > I need to go to Windows once in a while, and some
    > of the features of this laptop might only be on the
    > windows side.
    >
    > So, ... do I kill one partition, such as the HDD Recovery,
    > SDA4, but somehow leave the space empty, thus "freeing" a
    > Primary partition?
    > I've done the initial laptop Create Recovery Disks
    > thing which took 2 DVDs (about 6 Gb) which should replace
    > it when needed.
    > I gather that Vista is always making up a series of CD
    > zized images of itself for recovery from a certain state.
    >
    > So / root, /home, /Swap will take up more partitions, though
    > once I have cut, squeezed, chopped the 133Gb in half for
    > this Linux install (i'll be adding eCs, the modern OS/2
    > sucessor later), they should take or will they need an
    > apparent Primary partition also.
    > The recovery disks seem to be Norton Ghost images to
    > restore the HDD parition and the complete image of the
    > remaining Windows Gigabytes of basic stuff in Vista Home.


    That's typical Toshiba. I know that there are ways to
    hack it so you can create a custom partition table and
    still recover using Toshiba's restore (I know because
    I've done it in the past on a different Toshiba laptop).

    >
    > Maybe there is a better way to restore the Windows part
    > by DVD/CD that would obviate the need for these three
    > extra-partions.
    >


    I wonder if Toshiba will sell you a real Windows install
    CD instead of their recovery one?? (unlikely, I know...
    just wondering)


  4. Re: Laptop has 4 Primary partitions in Vista, where does SuSe go?

    In article <13hf0j3m4ksaf84@corp.supernews.com>, Chris Cox wrote:
    >dan say wrote:
    >> A Toshiba p200 Satellite RT5 laptop with a single 150 Gb has
    >> four primary partitions under the default Vista.

    >
    >Did Toshiba use up all of the primary paritions, or did you?
    >You need to remember to make the final primary partition into
    >an extended partition if you plan on having more than 4
    >partitions on a host.
    >
    >If Tohsiba did this... shame on them.... but typical...
    >
    >You may have to do some backups or use a re-partitioning
    >tool (and backup ANYWAY!!).
    >
    >

    Yes, this is a "virgin" machine, bought in Canada,
    so the first question is English or French and then it
    proceeds to delete the software in the other language.
    I examined the drive then, and did their Toshiba Recovery
    setup to 2 DVDs
    It seems to be a Norton Ghost making CD sized images
    from a 'set point'
    Mandriva, Fedora, SuSE installers all see 4 primary
    partitions.
    The first small one (1.4 Gig) seems to be a proprietary
    Toshiba one for (what? Recovery? Backing up?)
    The second partition is drive C: for Windows and is
    the largest. The internal Windows sofrware can shrink to
    half size, though it seems to 'only' have about 6 Gig on it.
    The third partiion might be the remnants of the French
    language software. (By the say, the BIOS can be either
    language)
    The fourth and end of disk partition has ZZImages on it
    that are used in backup. Backing up files (a different
    procedure, backs up only created files, not programmes, and
    offers the third disk as a place to put it.
    >>
    >> SDA1 Volume label Toshiba System Volume
    >> Type NTFS (0x27)
    >> Start sector 2048 >> Size 1.4 Gb
    >> Cyl 0 to 191
    >> SDA2 Volume Label S3A6423233
    >> D:
    >> Type NTFS (0x7) >> Start sector 3074048
    >> Size 133 Gb >> Cyl 191-17639
    >> SDA3
    >> E:?
    >> Type NTFS (0x7) >> Start SEctor 283371520
    >> Size 7 Gb >> Cyl 17639-18590
    >> SDA4 Volume Label: HDD recovery
    >> Type HIddten HPFS/NTFS 0x17
    >> Start Sector 298655740 >> Size 6Gb
    >> Cyl 18590-19457 >>

    .....

    >> The recovery disks seem to be Norton Ghost images to
    >> restore the HDD parition and the complete image of the
    >> remaining Windows Gigabytes of basic stuff in Vista Home.

    >
    >That's typical Toshiba. I know that there are ways to
    >hack it so you can create a custom partition table and
    >still recover using Toshiba's restore (I know because
    >I've done it in the past on a different Toshiba laptop).
    >

    There seems to be various restore options, not
    documented, but in the screen, which I will try
    to copy down or make screen shots.
    >>
    >> Maybe there is a better way to restore the Windows part
    >> by DVD/CD that would obviate the need for these three
    >> extra-partions.

    >
    >I wonder if Toshiba will sell you a real Windows install
    >CD instead of their recovery one?? (unlikely, I know...
    >just wondering)

    The paper and manual only offer Restore CDs
    but I'll check.

  5. Re: Laptop has 4 Primary partitions in Vista, where does SuSe go?

    Chris Cox wrote:
    > dan say wrote:
    >> A Toshiba p200 Satellite RT5 laptop with a single 150 Gb has
    >> four primary partitions under the default Vista.

    > Did Toshiba use up all of the primary paritions, or did you?
    > You need to remember to make the final primary partition into
    > an extended partition if you plan on having more than 4
    > partitions on a host.
    >
    > If Tohsiba did this... shame on them.... but typical...
    > You may have to do some backups or use a re-partitioning
    > tool (and backup ANYWAY!!).
    >
    >> SDA1 Volume label Toshiba System Volume
    >> Type NTFS (0x27)
    >> Start sector 2048
    >> Size 1.4 Gb >> Cyl 0 to 191
    >> C:
    >> SDA2 Volume Label S3A6423233
    >> D: >> Type NTFS (0x7)
    >> Start sector 3074048
    >> Size 133 Gb >> Cyl 191-17639
    >> SDA3 >> E:?
    >> Type NTFS (0x7)
    >> Start SEctor 283371520
    >> Size 7 Gb >> Cyl 17639-18590
    >> SDA4 Volume Label: HDD recovery
    >> Type HIddten HPFS/NTFS 0x17
    >> Start Sector 298655740
    >> Size 6Gb >> Cyl 18590-19457
    >>

    > That's typical Toshiba. I know that there are ways to
    > hack it so you can create a custom partition table and
    > still recover using Toshiba's restore (I know because
    > I've done it in the past on a different Toshiba laptop).
    >>
    >> Maybe there is a better way to restore the Windows part
    >> by DVD/CD that would obviate the need for these three
    >> extra-partions.

    >
    > I wonder if Toshiba will sell you a real Windows install
    > CD instead of their recovery one?? (unlikely, I know...
    > just wondering)


    So I tried both sets of recovery disks.
    Turns out the early Toshiba recovery backup
    is the same as the one after I install some
    500 Megs of Windows sofware to make it more
    useable.

    However, after insralling SuSE, and wanting
    Dual Boot, it turns out that the recovery DVDs
    offer the option to fit a smaller size.
    This means that those last rwo parttions are
    never made. It turns out the backup sofware
    won't work either.

    But I get Vista into a smaller Gig partition.
    Then create a second drive, also a FAT32 as
    a sharing space. All as large as 4 Gig for
    CD and DVD writing.

    Now I have more than enough space for SuSE
    and its parts.

    If I am careful with Windows things, putting
    them in a distinct folder/directory and back
    up often, I can do a two-stage recovery if I
    remember how big I made the Windows Vista
    partition last time, filling a Win-prog
    directory from a back-up CD/DVD

    Good enough.

    --
    The 100 year future of Linux
    http://www.linaccess.org/view.php?pageid=1000
    Announced http://www.linuxasia.net/la07/news.php

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