Problems with /dev/null after upgrade to 10.3 - Suse

This is a discussion on Problems with /dev/null after upgrade to 10.3 - Suse ; Hello, today I upgraded from 10.1 to 10.3 doing a fresh install but keeping /home and /usr/local. Now I'm experiencing problems which seem to be caused by a broken /dev/null (e. g. when I'm trying to execute ssh, I get ...

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Thread: Problems with /dev/null after upgrade to 10.3

  1. Problems with /dev/null after upgrade to 10.3

    Hello,

    today I upgraded from 10.1 to 10.3 doing a fresh install but keeping
    /home and /usr/local. Now I'm experiencing problems which seem to be
    caused by a broken /dev/null (e. g. when I'm trying to execute ssh, I
    get the message "Couldn't open /dev/null: Permission denied").

    My system says:
    > ls -ld /dev/null*

    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 39 13. Okt 15:18 /dev/null
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4051 13. Okt 15:17 /dev/null.2007-10-13.0
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 17 13. Okt 15:17 /dev/null.current ->
    null.2007-10-13.0

    Any ideas what's wrong and how to fix it?

    Greetings,

    Marc

  2. Re: Problems with /dev/null after upgrade to 10.3

    On Sat, 13 Oct 2007, Marc Ensenbach wrote:-

    >Hello,
    >
    >today I upgraded from 10.1 to 10.3 doing a fresh install but keeping
    >/home and /usr/local. Now I'm experiencing problems which seem to be
    >caused by a broken /dev/null (e. g. when I'm trying to execute ssh, I
    >get the message "Couldn't open /dev/null: Permission denied").
    >
    >My system says:
    >> ls -ld /dev/null*

    >-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 39 13. Okt 15:18 /dev/null
    >-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4051 13. Okt 15:17 /dev/null.2007-10-13.0
    >lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 17 13. Okt 15:17 /dev/null.current ->
    >null.2007-10-13.0
    >
    >Any ideas what's wrong


    Yes. Something has deleted the device /dev/null and replaced it with a
    normal file. You can possibly find out what created the file by looking
    at the contents, but that won't tell you why it was removed.

    >and how to fix it?


    That's easy. Delete the file and then recreate the device. Log in on a
    console as root and then these two commands should fix it:

    rm /dev/null*
    mknod --mode=666 /dev/null c 1 3

    The mknod will create the device /dev/null, and gives it the normal mode
    666, which means anyone can read and write to it.

    Purely as an example, and don't try this at home:

    lion:~ # rm /dev/null*
    lion:~ # ls -l /dev/null*
    ls: cannot access /dev/null*: No such file or directory

    Oops, no /dev/null.

    lion:~ # mknod --mode=666 /dev/null c 1 3
    lion:~ # ls -l /dev/null*
    crw-rw-rw- 1 root root 1, 3 Oct 13 15:28 /dev/null

    That's better, all is well with the world^w^w/dev .

    lion:~ # mknod /dev/null2 c 1 3
    lion:~ # ls -l /dev/null*
    crw-rw-rw- 1 root root 1, 3 Oct 13 15:28 /dev/null
    crw-r--r-- 1 root root 1, 3 Oct 13 15:29 /dev/null2

    Oh look, root now has their own /dev/null2. Not much use as, not
    normally existing, no-one know it's there and so wouldn't use it.

    lion:~ # rm /dev/null2

    Well, why not. It's not like it's ever going to be used.


    Regards,
    David Bolt

    --
    Member of Team Acorn checking nodes at 100 Mnodes/s: www.distributed.net
    SUSE 10.0 32bit | SUSE 10.1 32bit | openSUSE 10.2 32bit | openSUSE 10.3 32bit
    SUSE 10.0 64bit | SUSE 10.1 64bit | openSUSE 10.2 64bit |
    RISC OS 3.11 | RISC OS 3.6 | TOS 4.02 | openSUSE 10.3 PPC

  3. Re: Problems with /dev/null after upgrade to 10.3

    David Bolt wrote:
    > On Sat, 13 Oct 2007, Marc Ensenbach wrote:-
    >> My system says:
    >>> ls -ld /dev/null*

    >> -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 39 13. Okt 15:18 /dev/null
    >> -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4051 13. Okt 15:17 /dev/null.2007-10-13.0
    >> lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 17 13. Okt 15:17 /dev/null.current ->
    >> null.2007-10-13.0
    >>
    >> Any ideas what's wrong

    >
    > Yes. Something has deleted the device /dev/null and replaced it with a
    > normal file. You can possibly find out what created the file by looking
    > at the contents, but that won't tell you why it was removed.


    I think I found out. The guilty one is ... KInternet. Before initiating
    a modem connection, everthing is fine:

    > ls -ld /dev/null*

    crw-rw-rw- 1 root root 1, 3 21. Sep 21:12 /dev/null

    During dialing the system becomes corrupted:

    > ls -ld /dev/null*

    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 188 13. Okt 16:54 /dev/null.2007-10-13.0
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 17 13. Okt 16:54 /dev/null.current ->
    null.2007-10-13.0

    And finally, when the connection is established, it says:

    > dir /dev/null*

    -rw------- 1 root root 39 13. Okt 16:55 /dev/null
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 1651 13. Okt 16:55 /dev/null.2007-10-13.0
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 17 13. Okt 16:54 /dev/null.current ->
    null.2007-10-13.0

    >> and how to fix it?

    >
    > That's easy. Delete the file and then recreate the device. [...]


    Thanks. That helped to temporarily solve the problem. But when I
    reconnect, the device is again deleted and replaced by a file. Any ideas
    how to stop KInternet from messing up /dev/null?

    Greetings,

    Marc

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