Strange behaviour - Suse

This is a discussion on Strange behaviour - Suse ; Mayby I should post this in a Windows group too. For some things I use XP pro which I dualboot with my SUSE 10.1, this has worked flawless for a long time. Recently I got this strange behaviour. I start ...

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Thread: Strange behaviour

  1. Strange behaviour

    Mayby I should post this in a Windows group too.

    For some things I use XP pro which I dualboot with my SUSE 10.1, this
    has worked flawless for a long time. Recently I got this strange behaviour.

    I start Windows, do what I need to do, surf the net, and select restart.
    After restarting (warm boot) in Suse, I can't get any connection to the
    net. If I do a cold boot - take off the power - and start in SUSE,
    everything is then OK. Until a few months ago, I could select restart
    and let the system start SUSE unattended via the bootmanager.

    Question is what does Windows do to my netcard, and where should I look
    to find out? When somebody finds out how to use a simple webcam in SUSE,
    I can drop Windows altogether.

  2. Re: Strange behaviour

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2007 23:23:34 +0200, John Jensen wrote:

    > Mayby I should post this in a Windows group too.
    >
    > For some things I use XP pro which I dualboot with my SUSE 10.1, this
    > has worked flawless for a long time. Recently I got this strange behaviour.
    >
    > I start Windows, do what I need to do, surf the net, and select restart.
    > After restarting (warm boot) in Suse, I can't get any connection to the
    > net. If I do a cold boot - take off the power - and start in SUSE,
    > everything is then OK. Until a few months ago, I could select restart
    > and let the system start SUSE unattended via the bootmanager.
    >
    > Question is what does Windows do to my netcard, and where should I look
    > to find out? When somebody finds out how to use a simple webcam in SUSE,
    > I can drop Windows altogether.


    I found that a WinXP update to my NIC had similar behavior. I rolled back
    the driver in WinXP and the card started working again in Linux.

    Since the card works again in Linux, I did not concentrate on the why very
    much. Sorry I have no explanation for the behavior.
    --
    James
    *Note: Remove every other letter for correct email address


  3. Re: Strange behaviour

    In article <5jSOi.24$rO6.18@news.get2net.dk>, pkr6000@yahoo.dk says...
    > Mayby I should post this in a Windows group too.
    >
    > For some things I use XP pro which I dualboot with my SUSE 10.1, this
    > has worked flawless for a long time. Recently I got this strange behaviour.
    >
    > I start Windows, do what I need to do, surf the net, and select restart.
    > After restarting (warm boot) in Suse, I can't get any connection to the
    > net. If I do a cold boot - take off the power - and start in SUSE,
    > everything is then OK. Until a few months ago, I could select restart
    > and let the system start SUSE unattended via the bootmanager.
    >
    > Question is what does Windows do to my netcard, and where should I look
    > to find out? When somebody finds out how to use a simple webcam in SUSE,
    > I can drop Windows altogether.
    >


    In WinXP under device settings for the nic power management uncheck
    'Allow the computer to turn off device to save power'.

    Bill

  4. Re: Strange behaviour

    Bill wrote:
    > In article <5jSOi.24$rO6.18@news.get2net.dk>, pkr6000@yahoo.dk says...
    >> Mayby I should post this in a Windows group too.
    >>
    >> For some things I use XP pro which I dualboot with my SUSE 10.1, this
    >> has worked flawless for a long time. Recently I got this strange behaviour.
    >>
    >> I start Windows, do what I need to do, surf the net, and select restart.
    >> After restarting (warm boot) in Suse, I can't get any connection to the
    >> net. If I do a cold boot - take off the power - and start in SUSE,
    >> everything is then OK. Until a few months ago, I could select restart
    >> and let the system start SUSE unattended via the bootmanager.
    >>
    >> Question is what does Windows do to my netcard, and where should I look
    >> to find out? When somebody finds out how to use a simple webcam in SUSE,
    >> I can drop Windows altogether.
    >>

    >
    > In WinXP under device settings for the nic power management uncheck
    > 'Allow the computer to turn off device to save power'.
    >
    > Bill


    Did, and it works. Thanks. Actually I'm sure I had it unchecked
    manually, but Mr. Gates thinks otherwise.

    Now why on earth would Microsoft want to turn off the netcard, which
    isn't that power hungry. If I used Windows for real, which I do at work,
    I'd much prefer a more slim OS that would use the CPU cycles intelligently.

  5. Re: Strange behaviour

    In article , pkr6000@yahoo.dk says...
    > Bill wrote:
    > > In article <5jSOi.24$rO6.18@news.get2net.dk>, pkr6000@yahoo.dk says...
    > >>


    > >> I start Windows, do what I need to do, surf the net, and select restart.
    > >> After restarting (warm boot) in Suse, I can't get any connection to the
    > >> net. If I do a cold boot - take off the power - and start in SUSE,
    > >> everything is then OK. Until a few months ago, I could select restart
    > >> and let the system start SUSE unattended via the bootmanager.
    > >>
    > >> Question is what does Windows do to my netcard, and where should I look
    > >> to find out? When somebody finds out how to use a simple webcam in SUSE,
    > >> I can drop Windows altogether.
    > >>

    > >
    > > In WinXP under device settings for the nic power management uncheck
    > > 'Allow the computer to turn off device to save power'.
    > >
    > > Bill

    >
    > Did, and it works. Thanks. Actually I'm sure I had it unchecked
    > manually, but Mr. Gates thinks otherwise.
    >
    > Now why on earth would Microsoft want to turn off the netcard,


    To keep Linux from doing a net install. Do you have automatic
    updates turned on in Windows? It seems there is some discussion of
    Windows doing updates and settings changes without notifying the end
    user.

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/microsoft/?p=830

    Some update must have reset your cards settings.

    > which
    > isn't that power hungry. If I used Windows for real, which I do at work,
    > I'd much prefer a more slim OS that would use the CPU cycles intelligently.
    >



    Bill

  6. Re: Strange behaviour

    Bill wrote:
    > In article , pkr6000@yahoo.dk says...
    >> Bill wrote:
    >>> In article <5jSOi.24$rO6.18@news.get2net.dk>, pkr6000@yahoo.dk says...

    >
    >>>> I start Windows, do what I need to do, surf the net, and select restart.
    >>>> After restarting (warm boot) in Suse, I can't get any connection to the
    >>>> net. If I do a cold boot - take off the power - and start in SUSE,
    >>>> everything is then OK. Until a few months ago, I could select restart
    >>>> and let the system start SUSE unattended via the bootmanager.
    >>>>
    >>>> Question is what does Windows do to my netcard, and where should I look
    >>>> to find out? When somebody finds out how to use a simple webcam in SUSE,
    >>>> I can drop Windows altogether.
    >>>>
    >>> In WinXP under device settings for the nic power management uncheck
    >>> 'Allow the computer to turn off device to save power'.
    >>>
    >>> Bill

    >> Did, and it works. Thanks. Actually I'm sure I had it unchecked
    >> manually, but Mr. Gates thinks otherwise.
    >>
    >> Now why on earth would Microsoft want to turn off the netcard,

    >
    > To keep Linux from doing a net install. Do you have automatic
    > updates turned on in Windows? It seems there is some discussion of
    > Windows doing updates and settings changes without notifying the end
    > user.
    >
    > http://blogs.zdnet.com/microsoft/?p=830
    >
    > Some update must have reset your cards settings.
    >
    >> which
    >> isn't that power hungry. If I used Windows for real, which I do at work,
    >> I'd much prefer a more slim OS that would use the CPU cycles intelligently.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Bill


    Wouldnt surprise me at all, if it was for blocking on-line installation
    of non-microsoft stuff. I have used Microsoft products since 1987, and I
    have seen things that convinced me that there is no bottom limit to what
    they think they can get away with.

    If you search MS QA database for dualbooting Windows and Linux - yes
    they do have an artice about that, you are meticously led through a
    guide an how to remove Linux. Same was the case with OS/2.

    rgds
    John

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