What IP address do I have - Suse

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Thread: What IP address do I have

  1. What IP address do I have

    Hi All,

    I have installed Suse 10,1. I am using a wireless internet service
    from AT&T. Everything is working - but - I have made a web server and
    I want a colleague of mine to be able to access it.

    I do 'ifconfig' and get an IP address and send it to him. He then told
    me that the address was for a WAN and not a LAN - oops! (I sent him
    192.168.1.67) - see below


    eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:19:21:1F:EF:8C
    inet addr:192.168.1.67 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:
    255.255.255.0
    inet6 addr: fe80::219:21ff:fe1f:ef8c/64 Scope:Link
    UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    RX packets:181912 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    TX packets:103699 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    RX bytes:155933054 (148.7 Mb) TX bytes:13910295 (13.2 Mb)
    Interrupt:177

    Then, I use a website "no-ip.com" to see that the IP address that they
    think I am broadcasting from is: 76.240.78.202.

    Of course, when trying to use it (http://76.240.78.202:8080/), it
    stalls. Leaving me to believe that this is some kind of firewall or
    proxy address.

    Again, I am running Suse 10.1. What can I do to allow my colleague to
    see my web server?

    TIA.


  2. Re: What IP address do I have

    On Sep 16, 7:27 pm, NiteRider wrote:
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I have installed Suse 10,1. I am using a wireless internet service
    > from AT&T. Everything is working - but - I have made a web server and
    > I want a colleague of mine to be able to access it.
    >
    > I do 'ifconfig' and get an IP address and send it to him. He then told
    > me that the address was for a WAN and not a LAN - oops! (I sent him
    > 192.168.1.67) - see below
    >
    > eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:19:21:1F:EF:8C
    > inet addr:192.168.1.67 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:
    > 255.255.255.0
    > inet6 addr: fe80::219:21ff:fe1f:ef8c/64 Scope:Link
    > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    > RX packets:181912 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    > TX packets:103699 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    > RX bytes:155933054 (148.7 Mb) TX bytes:13910295 (13.2 Mb)
    > Interrupt:177
    >
    > Then, I use a website "no-ip.com" to see that the IP address that they
    > think I am broadcasting from is: 76.240.78.202.
    >
    > Of course, when trying to use it (http://76.240.78.202:8080/), it
    > stalls. Leaving me to believe that this is some kind of firewall or
    > proxy address.
    >
    > Again, I am running Suse 10.1. What can I do to allow my colleague to
    > see my web server?
    >
    > TIA.


    Hi,

    if you perform on a terminal "iptables -L" what is the output?
    Obviously there is an appropriate entry missing.

    Regards.
    T. Kontogiannis


  3. Re: What IP address do I have

    NiteRider wrote:

    > Hi All,


    Hi you too,

    you should not crosspost to bunch of groups, as it is:
    - not fine (rude) according to usenet netiquette
    - technique used by spammers and trolls,
    - first normal message that is crossposted that I have seen in last 2 years
    - most of people that can help you will see your message as quote in my
    reply as they discard all crossposts for above reasons

    The above is the reason that I removed all but this group from message
    header.

    > I have installed Suse 10,1. I am using a wireless internet service
    > from AT&T. Everything is working - but - I have made a web server and
    > I want a colleague of mine to be able to access it.
    >
    > I do 'ifconfig' and get an IP address and send it to him. He then told
    > me that the address was for a WAN and not a LAN - oops! (I sent him
    > 192.168.1.67) - see below


    Vice versa 192.168.1.67 is a LAN (Local Area Network) IP.

    > eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:19:21:1F:EF:8C
    > inet addr:192.168.1.67 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:

    .....
    > Then, I use a website "no-ip.com" to see that the IP address that they
    > think I am broadcasting from is: 76.240.78.202.


    That one is your public IP.
    It should not be called WAN (Wide Area Network) as the term is used for
    specific type of basically private networks, but some home routers use term
    WAN instead of Internet.

    > Of course, when trying to use it (http://76.240.78.202:8080/), it
    > stalls. Leaving me to believe that this is some kind of firewall or
    > proxy address.


    Your AT&T wireless router and SUSE firewall.
    You should specify that router can route incoming connection attempt from
    to your computer at local IP 192.168.1.67:8080 and open
    port 8080 in SUSEfirewall, and give the current public IP address to him.
    He should give his public IP to you too, so that you must not open router
    for incoming connections from any address.

    > Again, I am running Suse 10.1. What can I do to allow my colleague to
    > see my web server?
    >
    > TIA.


    --
    Regards,
    Rajko.

  4. Re: What IP address do I have

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2007 09:27:01 -0700, NiteRider wrote:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > I have installed Suse 10,1. I am using a wireless internet service
    > from AT&T. Everything is working - but - I have made a web server and
    > I want a colleague of mine to be able to access it.
    >
    > I do 'ifconfig' and get an IP address and send it to him. He then told
    > me that the address was for a WAN and not a LAN - oops! (I sent him
    > 192.168.1.67) - see below
    >
    >
    > eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:19:21:1F:EF:8C
    > inet addr:192.168.1.67 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:
    > 255.255.255.0
    > inet6 addr: fe80::219:21ff:fe1f:ef8c/64 Scope:Link
    > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    > RX packets:181912 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    > TX packets:103699 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    > RX bytes:155933054 (148.7 Mb) TX bytes:13910295 (13.2 Mb)
    > Interrupt:177
    >
    > Then, I use a website "no-ip.com" to see that the IP address that they
    > think I am broadcasting from is: 76.240.78.202.


    That would be the address of your modem/router. You'll need to set up port
    forwarding to forward requests for the appropriate port to your particular
    local machine. You may get more help from comp.os.linux.networking.


    >
    > Of course, when trying to use it (http://76.240.78.202:8080/), it
    > stalls. Leaving me to believe that this is some kind of firewall or
    > proxy address.
    >
    > Again, I am running Suse 10.1. What can I do to allow my colleague to
    > see my web server?
    >
    > TIA.



  5. Re: What IP address do I have

    On Sep 16, 11:56 am, tko...@gmail.com wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > if you perform on a terminal "iptables -L" what is the output?
    > Obviously there is an appropriate entry missing.
    >
    > Regards.
    > T. Kontogiannis


    Here is the output from "iptables -L"

    INext-DROP-DEFLT '
    DROP all -- anywhere anywhere PKTTYPE =
    multicast
    LOG tcp -- anywhere anywhere limit:
    avg 3/min burst 5 tcp flags:FIN,SYN,RST,ACK/SYN LOG level warning tcp-
    options ip-options prefix `SFW2-INext-DROP-DEFLT '
    LOG icmp -- anywhere anywhere limit:
    avg 3/min burst 5 LOG level warning tcp-options ip-options prefix
    `SFW2-INext-DROP-DEFLT '
    LOG udp -- anywhere anywhere limit:
    avg 3/min burst 5 LOG level warning tcp-options ip-options prefix
    `SFW2-INext-DROP-DEFLT '
    LOG all -- anywhere anywhere limit:
    avg 3/min burst 5 state INVALID LOG level warning tcp-options ip-
    options prefix `SFW2-INext-DROP-DEFLT-INV '
    DROP all -- anywhere anywhere

    Chain reject_func (1 references)
    target prot opt source destination
    REJECT tcp -- anywhere anywhere reject-
    with tcp-reset
    REJECT udp -- anywhere anywhere reject-
    with icmp-port-unreachable
    REJECT all -- anywhere anywhere reject-
    with icmp-proto-unreachable

    Cheers,
    NR


  6. Re: What IP address do I have

    Hi All,

    Thanks for all the responses :-) I did some search on the net and
    found a thread (the link is listed below) of someone in a similar
    situation: 2Wire gateway, Linux OS,

    Basically, more information is as follows:

    gandolf:~ # route -n
    Kernel IP routing table
    Destination Gateway Genmask Flags
    Metric Ref Use Iface
    192.168.1.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U
    0 0 0 eth0
    127.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
    U 0 0 0 lo
    0.0.0.0 192.168.1.254 0.0.0.0 UG
    0 0 0 eth0


    According to the thread below,
    http://groups.google.com/group/comp....f1f16992c5a7f4

    The line:

    0.0.0.0 192.168.1.254 0.0.0.0 UG
    0 0 0 eth0

    Should allow for my colleague to connect to my web server on my Linux
    box but this is not working. Is there something else that needs to be
    done? Is the table correct?

    TIA,
    KR


  7. Re: What IP address do I have

    NiteRider writes:

    >Hi All,


    >I have installed Suse 10,1. I am using a wireless internet service
    >from AT&T. Everything is working - but - I have made a web server and
    >I want a colleague of mine to be able to access it.


    >I do 'ifconfig' and get an IP address and send it to him. He then told
    >me that the address was for a WAN and not a LAN - oops! (I sent him


    Other way around. Lan is Local Area Network, while Wan is Wide area
    network.
    The numbers 192.168.x.x and 10.x.x.x are unroutable address on the world
    wide net. Any packet with those as destination are simply thrown away by
    routers on the internet. Ie, noone except on your local network can use
    them to communicate with your machine.

    >192.168.1.67) - see below



    >eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:19:21:1F:EF:8C
    > inet addr:192.168.1.67 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:
    >255.255.255.0


    You probably got this via dhcp from your adsl/cable/... modem

    > inet6 addr: fe80::219:21ff:fe1f:ef8c/64 Scope:Link
    > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    > RX packets:181912 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    > TX packets:103699 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    > RX bytes:155933054 (148.7 Mb) TX bytes:13910295 (13.2 Mb)
    > Interrupt:177


    >Then, I use a website "no-ip.com" to see that the IP address that they
    >think I am broadcasting from is: 76.240.78.202.

    Yup that is the address assigned to your router.



    >Of course, when trying to use it (http://76.240.78.202:8080/), it
    >stalls. Leaving me to believe that this is some kind of firewall or
    >proxy address.


    It is a router/modem which is not designed to pass on packets. You can do
    one of three things.
    a) forget coming in from outside.
    b) set up a vpn between your machine and his machine.
    c) set up your router to do port forwarding ( where if the router gets a
    packet for port 80 say it automatically sends it to port80 on your
    machine-- but this means that your local IP address must be stable-- ie not
    dhcp, or with the dhcp address tied to your mac address
    d) set up your router to do bridging so that your computer is also given
    the address 76.240.78.202 with all packets immediately forwarded to your
    machine.

    (And yes that is four points not three).


    >Again, I am running Suse 10.1. What can I do to allow my colleague to
    >see my web server?


    Is your address supplied by a router under your command ( eg from an adsl
    modem) or is it supplied from some organisation out of your command. In the
    latter case you are SOL.


    >TIA.



  8. Re: What IP address do I have

    NiteRider writes:

    >Hi All,


    >Thanks for all the responses :-) I did some search on the net and
    >found a thread (the link is listed below) of someone in a similar
    >situation: 2Wire gateway, Linux OS,


    Ah. Look into the 2Wire manual and set up the router to do bridging or half
    bridging. Or tell it to port forward, and make sure it gives your computer
    the same address each time.
    It is that 2wire modem/router that is assigned that routable address and is
    supplying your machine with its address.


    >Basically, more information is as follows:


    >gandolf:~ # route -n
    >Kernel IP routing table
    >Destination Gateway Genmask Flags
    >Metric Ref Use Iface
    >192.168.1.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U
    >0 0 0 eth0
    >127.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
    >U 0 0 0 lo
    >0.0.0.0 192.168.1.254 0.0.0.0 UG
    >0 0 0 eth0



    >According to the thread below,
    >http://groups.google.com/group/comp....f1f16992c5a7f4


    >The line:


    >0.0.0.0 192.168.1.254 0.0.0.0 UG
    >0 0 0 eth0


    >Should allow for my colleague to connect to my web server on my Linux
    >box but this is not working. Is there something else that needs to be
    >done? Is the table correct?


    No it should not. That simply says that your default route is through
    192.168.1.254 ( which is the router). It says nothing about packets getting
    back to you. There is NOTHING you can do on your computer which can get
    others to be able to send stuff to you. You MUST go into the router/modem (
    use your web browser and go to
    192.168.1.254 and you will get the setup pages for the router.)

    Then either tell the router to do bridging or to do port forwarding.



    >TIA,
    >KR



  9. Re: What IP address do I have

    NiteRider wrote:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > Thanks for all the responses :-) I did some search on the net and
    > found a thread (the link is listed below) of someone in a similar
    > situation: 2Wire gateway, Linux OS,

    ....
    http://groups.google.com/group/comp....f1f16992c5a7f4

    The problem is the same, but I can't see solution.

    > The line:
    >
    > 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.254 0.0.0.0 UG
    > 0 0 0 eth0
    >
    > Should allow for my colleague to connect to my web server on my Linux
    > box but this is not working. Is there something else that needs to be
    > done? Is the table correct?


    That table can be source of problem, but if you leave YaST to create it
    and maintain it would be no problem.


    Basic connection:
    your_computer - 2Wire - Phone_Line (AT&T central office) - Internet

    Connection in more details:
    Inside your_computer
    Web server - SUSEfirewall - Ethernet_card - Network_connector

    Inside 2Wire
    Input_network_connector - Switch - Router - DSL_modem - Phone_jack

    Now all in one:
    Web server - SUSEfirewall - Ethernet_card - Network_connector -
    Ethernet_cable - Input_network_connector - Switch - Router - DSL_modem -
    Phone_jack - Phone_Line (AT&T central office) - Internet

    Between your web server and Internet is SUSEfirewall and Router that has
    built in firewall.

    The SUSEfirewall should have open port 8080 if you want to use it (default
    is 80 for http) and it should be enabled manually in separate setup screen
    for additional addresses.
    Setup is in YaST -> Security and Users -> Firewall.

    The Router in 2wire is using NAT
    see
    http://www.howstuffworks.com/nat.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network...ss_translation
    http://www.homenethelp.com/web/explain/about-NAT.asp

    You should change Router (inside 2wire) configuration to allow connection in
    opposite direction. You have to login in 2Wire and find section about
    firewall.

    There you have few options. One easy to set up is to set you computer in
    DMZ, but then be very carefull with your SUSEfirewall.

    The 2Wire support is here:
    http://support.2wire.com/cgi-bin/two...a=&p_sp=&p_li=

    --
    Regards,
    Rajko.

  10. Re: What IP address do I have

    NiteRider wrote:
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I have installed Suse 10,1. I am using a wireless internet service
    > from AT&T. Everything is working - but - I have made a web server and
    > I want a colleague of mine to be able to access it.
    >
    > I do 'ifconfig' and get an IP address and send it to him. He then told
    > me that the address was for a WAN and not a LAN - oops! (I sent him
    > 192.168.1.67) - see below
    >
    >
    > eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:19:21:1F:EF:8C
    > inet addr:192.168.1.67 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:
    > 255.255.255.0
    > inet6 addr: fe80::219:21ff:fe1f:ef8c/64 Scope:Link
    > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    > RX packets:181912 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    > TX packets:103699 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    > RX bytes:155933054 (148.7 Mb) TX bytes:13910295 (13.2 Mb)
    > Interrupt:177
    >
    > Then, I use a website "no-ip.com" to see that the IP address that they
    > think I am broadcasting from is: 76.240.78.202.
    >
    > Of course, when trying to use it (http://76.240.78.202:8080/), it
    > stalls. Leaving me to believe that this is some kind of firewall or
    > proxy address.
    >
    > Again, I am running Suse 10.1. What can I do to allow my colleague to
    > see my web server?


    In FC since it was Redhat there has been a user usable program ip in /sbin It
    will tell you more than you want to know.

    --
    Hodie decimo quinto Kalendas Novembres MMVII est
    -- The Ferric Webceasar
    nizkor http://www.giwersworld.org/nizkook/nizkook.phtml
    http://www.giwersworld.org

  11. Re: What IP address do I have

    On Sep 17, 5:48 am, Bill Unruh wrote:
    > NiteRider writes:
    > >Hi All,
    > >I have installed Suse 10,1. I am using a wireless internet service
    > >from AT&T. Everything is working - but - I have made a web server and
    > >I want a colleague of mine to be able to access it.
    > >I do 'ifconfig' and get an IP address and send it to him. He then told
    > >me that the address was for a WAN and not a LAN - oops! (I sent him

    >
    > Other way around. Lan is Local Area Network, while Wan is Wide area
    > network.
    > The numbers 192.168.x.x and 10.x.x.x are unroutable address on the world
    > wide net. Any packet with those as destination are simply thrown away by
    > routers on the internet. Ie, noone except on your local network can use
    > them to communicate with your machine.
    >
    > >192.168.1.67) - see below
    > >eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:19:21:1F:EF:8C
    > > inet addr:192.168.1.67 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:
    > >255.255.255.0

    >
    > You probably got this via dhcp from your adsl/cable/... modem
    >
    > > inet6 addr: fe80::219:21ff:fe1f:ef8c/64 Scope:Link
    > > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    > > RX packets:181912 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    > > TX packets:103699 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > > collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    > > RX bytes:155933054 (148.7 Mb) TX bytes:13910295 (13.2 Mb)
    > > Interrupt:177
    > >Then, I use a website "no-ip.com" to see that the IP address that they
    > >think I am broadcasting from is: 76.240.78.202.

    >
    > Yup that is the address assigned to your router.
    >
    > >Of course, when trying to use it (http://76.240.78.202:8080/), it
    > >stalls. Leaving me to believe that this is some kind of firewall or
    > >proxy address.

    >
    > It is a router/modem which is not designed to pass on packets. You can do
    > one of three things.
    > a) forget coming in from outside.
    > b) set up a vpn between your machine and his machine.
    > c) set up your router to do port forwarding ( where if the router gets a
    > packet for port 80 say it automatically sends it to port80 on your
    > machine-- but this means that your local IP address must be stable-- ie not
    > dhcp, or with the dhcp address tied to your mac address
    > d) set up your router to do bridging so that your computer is also given
    > the address 76.240.78.202 with all packets immediately forwarded to your
    > machine.
    >
    > (And yes that is four points not three).
    >
    > >Again, I am running Suse 10.1. What can I do to allow my colleague to
    > >see my web server?

    >
    > Is your address supplied by a router under your command ( eg from an adsl
    > modem) or is it supplied from some organisation out of your command. In the
    > latter case you are SOL.
    >
    > >TIA.


    If the external address is supplied by the ISP he can still use one of
    the dynamic-dns services (I use dyndns.org) together with port-
    forwarding to make the web-site publicly available.


  12. Re: What IP address do I have

    On Sep 17, 3:59 am, NiteRider wrote:
    > Hi All,
    >
    > Thanks for all the responses :-) I did some search on the net and
    > found a thread (the link is listed below) of someone in a similar
    > situation: 2Wire gateway, Linux OS,
    >
    > Basically, more information is as follows:
    >
    > gandolf:~ # route -n
    > Kernel IP routing table
    > Destination Gateway Genmask Flags
    > Metric Ref Use Iface
    > 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U
    > 0 0 0 eth0
    > 127.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
    > U 0 0 0 lo
    > 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.254 0.0.0.0 UG
    > 0 0 0 eth0
    >
    > According to the thread below,http://groups.google.com/group/comp..../browse_thread...
    >
    > The line:
    >
    > 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.254 0.0.0.0 UG
    > 0 0 0 eth0
    >
    > Should allow for my colleague to connect to my web server on my Linux
    > box but this is not working. Is there something else that needs to be
    > done? Is the table correct?
    >
    > TIA,
    > KR


    Internet <---> | Router | <---> | Server |

    Your router has 2 interfaces, each with it's own IP address.
    The interface which is connected to the internet has it's IP address
    allocated by the ISP to which it connects (76.240.78.202).
    The internal IP of the router is usually setup as a non-routable
    address (packets addressed to a non-routable address are just dropped
    if you try to send them over the internet - this means we can all use
    these addresses on out internal networks without fear of interfering
    with anybody outside). This internal interface is generally the
    gateway address you see as the default gateway in the 'route' command.
    Packets sent from your server go via the router and out to their
    detination somewhere on the internet, the router keeps a note of all
    'conversations' started in this way and automatically routes the
    replies back through it's internal interface and on to your computer.
    However, packets arriving at the router which are not part of an
    ongoing conversation started by you are just dropped by the router as
    it doesn't know what to do with them.
    You need to tell you router that a packet arriving from the internet
    with a destination port of 8080 is really intended for the web-server
    inside your network. This is known as 'port-forwarding' (for obvious
    reasons) and requires configuration of your router.
    You can usually configure the port-forwarding on your router by
    pointing your web-browser at the ip address of the internal interface
    of your router (http://192.168.1.254).
    While configuring your network in this way it's best to disable any
    firewall you may have on the local machine - you need to know where
    your problems lie.


  13. Re: What IP address do I have

    NiteRider wrote:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > I have installed Suse 10,1. I am using a wireless internet service
    > from AT&T. Everything is working - but - I have made a web server and
    > I want a colleague of mine to be able to access it.
    >
    > I do 'ifconfig' and get an IP address and send it to him. He then told
    > me that the address was for a WAN and not a LAN - oops! (I sent him
    > 192.168.1.67) - see below
    >
    >
    > eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:19:21:1F:EF:8C
    > inet addr:192.168.1.67 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:
    > 255.255.255.0
    > inet6 addr: fe80::219:21ff:fe1f:ef8c/64 Scope:Link
    > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    > RX packets:181912 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    > TX packets:103699 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    > collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    > RX bytes:155933054 (148.7 Mb) TX bytes:13910295 (13.2 Mb)
    > Interrupt:177
    >
    > Then, I use a website "no-ip.com" to see that the IP address that they
    > think I am broadcasting from is: 76.240.78.202.
    >
    > Of course, when trying to use it (http://76.240.78.202:8080/), it
    > stalls. Leaving me to believe that this is some kind of firewall or
    > proxy address.
    >
    > Again, I am running Suse 10.1. What can I do to allow my colleague to
    > see my web server?
    >
    > TIA.


    I see a lot of replies to your query but this is the one I use as it is
    simple and works. Copy the following in a text editor and save as some
    convenient name. I use "whatismyip.sh" . Then I created a desktop
    shortcut to this shell script with a nice icon I chose. So save the shell
    script somewhere you wont erase it. Then right click on the desktop and
    choose 'create new link to application. In the dialog that appears you can
    first choose an icon and title which should be something like "What Is My
    IP". On the 'Application tab next to the Command box click on the 'Browse
    button and navigate to the script you saved. Double click on it to select
    it. Now back at the 'Application' tab click on the 'Advanced Options'
    button and select [x] Run in terminal and then select [x] Do not close when
    command exits. Click OK. that should do it. You'll have to manually
    close the window when you are done reading the ip address.

    Here's the script: (leave off the dotted lines !)

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    #!/bin/sh

    echo "My Internet IP is: "`wget -qO- http://checkip.dyndns.org/ | sed 's|.*
    \([[:digit:]]*\.[[:digit:]]*\.[[:digit:]]*\.[[:digit:]]*\).*|\1|'`

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just copy and paste into the editor of your choice. I still use Nedit as It
    is powerful enough for most things and easy to use and learn.

    P.S. This script works for me. I have a dsl modem from SBC and a Linksys
    switch so this scipt makes getting my 'actual' IP easy. It's fast and
    reliable.

    Enjoy :-)

  14. Re: What IP address do I have

    --------------snip--------------------------------------------
    >
    > Just copy and paste into the editor of your choice. I still use Nedit as
    > It is powerful enough for most things and easy to use and learn.
    >
    > P.S. This script works for me. I have a dsl modem from SBC and a Linksys
    > switch so this scipt makes getting my 'actual' IP easy. It's fast and
    > reliable.
    >
    > Enjoy :-)


    Forgot to mention that you will need to make the script executable !

    In konqueror right click on the script. Click on 'Properties', then click
    on the 'Permissions' tab and make sure to check the 'Is Executable' box.
    Click OK.

  15. Re: What IP address do I have

    Hi All!,

    Thanks so much for the help! I have struck gold here!

    Basically, as mentioned before, was working with Suse 10.1 and had set
    up an Apache web server on the box. the goal was to fix it so that a
    colleague could look at it as well. I also have a 2WIRE 2701 gateway
    at my side.

    I got the answer after speaking with a rep. from 2Wire. When speaking
    with a SWB/AT&T rep, he said that I would need to get a static IP and
    that was the only way that it could work. He also said that the whole
    idea of IP forwarding would not accomplish what I needed, only a
    static IP would (which would cost more $$$).

    I looked at the documentation on www.2wire.com for the 2700 gateway
    (there is a .pdf file). Also, the screen called "Edit
    Application" (but of coure, in my case, I created one).

    When speaking to the guy from 2WIRE, this is what was done to make it
    work...

    1. I configured the firewall so that the port 8080 of my firewall was
    associated to port 8080 of my linux box.
    When it did not work before, it was because I was associating port
    80 of the firewall to port 8080 of the
    linux box. I guess the stuff doesn't work because port 80 is (at
    least to my understanding) associated with
    web servers in general.

    2. AUGGGH! Another thing that solved the problem was to turn of the
    firewall on my linux box! when Suse 10.1
    is installed, I think this is turned on by default. I would not
    have known to turn it off had the guy from 2WIRE
    not suggest it - I had totally forgotten it!

    So, now everything is cool - I have a local IP address for my linux
    box within my own little realm of networking and I also have a port
    through the firewall that connects to the httpd server (so my
    colleague can see what I have done).

    THANKS AGAIN GUYS!

    KR



  16. Re: What IP address do I have

    Hi All,

    I just wrote a reply but I think it got lost - so - here we go
    again :-)

    I have struck gold here! Yippee! Basically, the task has been
    accomplished.

    I spoke with a guy from AT&T, he said that the only way for me to
    accomplish what was needed, was for me to order a static IP from AT&T.
    He said that the IP forwarding "doesn't work like that".

    Then, I spoke to a rep from 2WIRE. With his help, the problem was
    solved. To do it, what I had to do was:

    1. Fix the port forwarding so that the port 8080 of the router is
    associated with 8080 of the Linux box. Before,
    I had it as port 80 of the router associated with 8080 of the
    linux box. I guess that this did not work because
    (to my understanding), port 80 is normally reserved for web
    servers.

    2. The hint that he gave me to solve this mess was to turn off the
    firewall on my linux system! I had forgotten
    that it was there. I think that Suse 10.1 activates automatically
    - but I am not totally sure. Anywho, THAT
    was the lynchpin and by shutting it off, all worked well.

    I followed the inputs/instructions at the www.2wire.com site. There is
    a .pdf file for how to configure the router. Basically, I just added a
    new definintion called "Server Port" and defined it as mentioned in
    step (1) above. I the application definition to the linux box.

    Well, I think (at least so far), this puppy can be put to rest.

    THANKS AGAIN GUYS!

    KR



  17. Re: What IP address do I have

    Andy Ruddock writes:

    >On Sep 17, 5:48 am, Bill Unruh wrote:
    >> NiteRider writes:
    >> >Hi All,
    >> >I have installed Suse 10,1. I am using a wireless internet service
    >> >from AT&T. Everything is working - but - I have made a web server and
    >> >I want a colleague of mine to be able to access it.
    >> >I do 'ifconfig' and get an IP address and send it to him. He then told
    >> >me that the address was for a WAN and not a LAN - oops! (I sent him

    >>
    >> Other way around. Lan is Local Area Network, while Wan is Wide area
    >> network.
    >> The numbers 192.168.x.x and 10.x.x.x are unroutable address on the world
    >> wide net. Any packet with those as destination are simply thrown away by
    >> routers on the internet. Ie, noone except on your local network can use
    >> them to communicate with your machine.
    >>
    >> >192.168.1.67) - see below
    >> >eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:19:21:1F:EF:8C
    >> > inet addr:192.168.1.67 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:
    >> >255.255.255.0

    >>
    >> You probably got this via dhcp from your adsl/cable/... modem
    >>
    >> > inet6 addr: fe80::219:21ff:fe1f:ef8c/64 Scope:Link
    >> > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    >> > RX packets:181912 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    >> > TX packets:103699 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    >> > collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    >> > RX bytes:155933054 (148.7 Mb) TX bytes:13910295 (13.2 Mb)
    >> > Interrupt:177
    >> >Then, I use a website "no-ip.com" to see that the IP address that they
    >> >think I am broadcasting from is: 76.240.78.202.

    >>
    >> Yup that is the address assigned to your router.
    >>
    >> >Of course, when trying to use it (http://76.240.78.202:8080/), it
    >> >stalls. Leaving me to believe that this is some kind of firewall or
    >> >proxy address.

    >>
    >> It is a router/modem which is not designed to pass on packets. You can do
    >> one of three things.
    >> a) forget coming in from outside.
    >> b) set up a vpn between your machine and his machine.
    >> c) set up your router to do port forwarding ( where if the router gets a
    >> packet for port 80 say it automatically sends it to port80 on your
    >> machine-- but this means that your local IP address must be stable-- ie not
    >> dhcp, or with the dhcp address tied to your mac address
    >> d) set up your router to do bridging so that your computer is also given
    >> the address 76.240.78.202 with all packets immediately forwarded to your
    >> machine.
    >>
    >> (And yes that is four points not three).
    >>
    >> >Again, I am running Suse 10.1. What can I do to allow my colleague to
    >> >see my web server?

    >>
    >> Is your address supplied by a router under your command ( eg from an adsl
    >> modem) or is it supplied from some organisation out of your command. In the
    >> latter case you are SOL.
    >>
    >> >TIA.


    >If the external address is supplied by the ISP he can still use one of
    >the dynamic-dns services (I use dyndns.org) together with port-
    >forwarding to make the web-site publicly available.


    Sure, but first he must use port forwarding, if he can actually get at the
    router to set that. If the router is out of his control (it sounds like it
    is not-- it is a 2wire I assume dsl modem/router), then he is SOL. If it is
    in his control, he may be able ( after negotiating the user manual of the
    modem) to enable port forwarding. That is the hard part.


  18. Re: What IP address do I have

    milkyway writes:

    >Hi All,


    >I just wrote a reply but I think it got lost - so - here we go
    >again :-)


    >I have struck gold here! Yippee! Basically, the task has been
    >accomplished.


    >I spoke with a guy from AT&T, he said that the only way for me to
    >accomplish what was needed, was for me to order a static IP from AT&T.
    >He said that the IP forwarding "doesn't work like that".


    Yes, he would wouldn't he. STatic addresses cost more.
    Also static addresses are static, which means that your public IP does not
    change each time the connection is brought up again.



    >Then, I spoke to a rep from 2WIRE. With his help, the problem was
    >solved. To do it, what I had to do was:


    >1. Fix the port forwarding so that the port 8080 of the router is
    >associated with 8080 of the Linux box. Before,
    > I had it as port 80 of the router associated with 8080 of the
    >linux box. I guess that this did not work because
    > (to my understanding), port 80 is normally reserved for web
    >servers.


    >2. The hint that he gave me to solve this mess was to turn off the
    >firewall on my linux system! I had forgotten
    > that it was there. I think that Suse 10.1 activates automatically
    >- but I am not totally sure. Anywho, THAT
    > was the lynchpin and by shutting it off, all worked well.


    >I followed the inputs/instructions at the www.2wire.com site. There is
    >a .pdf file for how to configure the router. Basically, I just added a
    >new definintion called "Server Port" and defined it as mentioned in
    >step (1) above. I the application definition to the linux box.


    >Well, I think (at least so far), this puppy can be put to rest.


    Great.

    >THANKS AGAIN GUYS!


    >KR




  19. Re: What IP address do I have

    milkyway wrote:

    > 2. AUGGGH! Another thing that solved the problem was to turn of the
    > firewall on my linux box! when Suse 10.1


    That is not so good.
    Better is to have just port 8080 enabled.
    One firewall is good, 2 are better ;-)

    --
    Regards,
    Rajko.

  20. Re: What IP address do I have

    Hello out there,

    Just adding a little info to this thread (should anyone need it).

    Basically, spoke with another 2wire guy today. My problem was that I
    was running a J2ME Midlet under Eclipse. I was using the Sun Emulator
    to call my web server (Apache) to bring in data from a DB. A colleague
    of mine wrote it to work with KSOAP from the J2ME side and I am using
    gSOAP from the server side.

    Anywho, when I did some testing of the J2ME code, when using the
    public IP address (needed to access the SOAP code), it was not
    working :-| So - spoke to the 2WIRE people again - they are really
    good !

    They said to go to: "http://192.x.x.x/mdc" where 192.x.x.x is the IP
    address of the machine locally. The mdc wil allow one to see the NAT
    table and the sessions that are working (or in my case not working). I
    wound up not using the alias IP address obtained from no-ip.com :-
    ( Oh well.

    But, should your application stall and you suspect it is network
    oriented, it seems as though this may help a little

    Regards.



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