My system halting...all by itself...help... - Suse

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  1. My system halting...all by itself...help...

    I'm a newbie...with another newbie problem.

    I boot my system up (openSUSE 10.2, with latest updates). I work in
    GUI mode, non-root userid -- for about 15 minutes. Then, I hear two
    beeps and a dialog pops up saying:

    Broadcast message from root: System is going down for a HALT
    immediately.

    Then, it follows up on its threat -- and my system shuts down.

    It just started doing this today (I've been using openSUSE for about a
    week now.).

    Please help me figure out how to stop this.

    Thanks,
    Randy


  2. Re: My system halting...all by itself...help...

    On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 18:46:34 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:

    > I'm a newbie...with another newbie problem.
    >
    > I boot my system up (openSUSE 10.2, with latest updates). I work in
    > GUI mode, non-root userid -- for about 15 minutes. Then, I hear two
    > beeps and a dialog pops up saying:
    >
    > Broadcast message from root: System is going down for a HALT
    > immediately.
    >
    > Then, it follows up on its threat -- and my system shuts down.
    >
    > It just started doing this today (I've been using openSUSE for about a
    > week now.).
    >
    > Please help me figure out how to stop this.


    Here's a short list of the usual suspects:

    -- Beagle and novel-zmd hogging resources (so uninstall them)

    -- over-heating caused by runaway processes (see below)

    -- over-heating from the weather

    Go into Yast2 (sw_single) and see if lm_sensors is installed. Get it
    working by doing
    #sensors-detect (accept all defaults)

    now profile your system and cpu temps and see if they are rising
    and triggering alarms.

    Another good package for heat profiling is cpufrequtils. Install this too
    and run
    #cpufreq-info

    thats a fast way to see if ondemand throttling is on by default and if its
    working properly.

    On this notebook, I see this
    ---------------- cpufreq-info -------------
    tlviewer@hercules:~> cpufreq-info
    cpufrequtils 002: cpufreq-info (C) Dominik Brodowski 2004-2006
    Report errors and bugs to http://bugs.opensuse.org, please.
    analyzing CPU 0:
    driver: centrino
    CPUs which need to switch frequency at the same time: 0
    hardware limits: 600 MHz - 1.70 GHz
    available frequency steps: 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.40 GHz, 1.20 GHz, 1000 MHz, 800 MHz, 600 MHz
    available cpufreq governors: conservative, ondemand, userspace, powersave, performance
    current policy: frequency should be within 600 MHz and 1.70 GHz.
    The governor "ondemand" may decide which speed to use
    within this range.
    current CPU frequency is 600 MHz.
    ----------- end snip -------------

    without power management this laptop would start smoking (ok I exagerate).

    --
    Mark

  3. Re: My system halting...all by itself...help...

    On Sep 8, 10:39 pm, Mark Pryor wrote:
    > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 18:46:34 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    > > I'm a newbie...with another newbie problem.

    >
    > > I boot my system up (openSUSE 10.2, with latest updates). I work in
    > > GUI mode, non-root userid -- for about 15 minutes. Then, I hear two
    > > beeps and a dialog pops up saying:

    >
    > > Broadcast message from root: System is going down for a HALT
    > > immediately.

    >
    > > Then, it follows up on its threat -- and my system shuts down.

    >
    > > It just started doing this today (I've been using openSUSE for about a
    > > week now.).

    >
    > > Please help me figure out how to stop this.

    >
    > Here's a short list of the usual suspects:
    >
    > -- Beagle and novel-zmd hogging resources (so uninstall them)
    >
    > -- over-heating caused by runaway processes (see below)
    >
    > -- over-heating from the weather
    >
    > Go into Yast2 (sw_single) and see if lm_sensors is installed. Get it
    > working by doing
    > #sensors-detect (accept all defaults)
    >
    > now profile your system and cpu temps and see if they are rising
    > and triggering alarms.
    >
    > Another good package for heat profiling is cpufrequtils. Install this too
    > and run
    > #cpufreq-info
    >
    > thats a fast way to see if ondemand throttling is on by default and if its
    > working properly.
    >
    > On this notebook, I see this
    > ---------------- cpufreq-info -------------
    > tlviewer@hercules:~> cpufreq-info
    > cpufrequtils 002: cpufreq-info (C) Dominik Brodowski 2004-2006
    > Report errors and bugs tohttp://bugs.opensuse.org, please.
    > analyzing CPU 0:
    > driver: centrino
    > CPUs which need to switch frequency at the same time: 0
    > hardware limits: 600 MHz - 1.70 GHz
    > available frequency steps: 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.40 GHz, 1.20 GHz, 1000 MHz, 800 MHz, 600 MHz
    > available cpufreq governors: conservative, ondemand, userspace, powersave, performance
    > current policy: frequency should be within 600 MHz and 1.70 GHz.
    > The governor "ondemand" may decide which speed to use
    > within this range.
    > current CPU frequency is 600 MHz.
    > ----------- end snip -------------
    >
    > without power management this laptop would start smoking (ok I exagerate).
    >
    > --
    > Mark


    Thanks for the pointers. I'm trying to figure out how to get the
    probes turned on as you suggested.

    I'm working with YAST through the GUI and I'm not sure where to find
    "sw_single" or "lm_sensors".

    I didn't realize that this behavior (root calling for a halt) might be
    hardware related. Today, we had a pretty bad lightening storm here --
    one hit close enough that it tripped a few GFI outlets in the house.
    This computer was turned off but plugged in at the time, but maybe
    something in the power supply got knocked out of spec.

    Before this, the machine had no problems (and it runs pretty
    cool...it's an older Celeron desktop).

    Thanks,
    Randy


  4. Re: My system halting...all by itself...help...

    On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 19:59:22 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:

    > On Sep 8, 10:39 pm, Mark Pryor wrote:
    >> On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 18:46:34 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    >> > I'm a newbie...with another newbie problem.

    >>
    >> > I boot my system up (openSUSE 10.2, with latest updates). I work in
    >> > GUI mode, non-root userid -- for about 15 minutes. Then, I hear two
    >> > beeps and a dialog pops up saying:

    >>
    >> > Broadcast message from root: System is going down for a HALT
    >> > immediately.

    >>
    >> > Then, it follows up on its threat -- and my system shuts down.

    >>
    >> > It just started doing this today (I've been using openSUSE for about a
    >> > week now.).

    >>
    >> > Please help me figure out how to stop this.

    >>
    >> Here's a short list of the usual suspects:
    >>
    >> -- Beagle and novel-zmd hogging resources (so uninstall them)
    >>
    >> -- over-heating caused by runaway processes (see below)
    >>
    >> -- over-heating from the weather
    >>
    >> Go into Yast2 (sw_single) and see if lm_sensors is installed. Get it
    >> working by doing
    >> #sensors-detect (accept all defaults)
    >>
    >> now profile your system and cpu temps and see if they are rising
    >> and triggering alarms.
    >>
    >> Another good package for heat profiling is cpufrequtils. Install this too
    >> and run
    >> #cpufreq-info
    >>
    >> thats a fast way to see if ondemand throttling is on by default and if its
    >> working properly.
    >>
    >> On this notebook, I see this
    >> ---------------- cpufreq-info -------------
    >> tlviewer@hercules:~> cpufreq-info
    >> cpufrequtils 002: cpufreq-info (C) Dominik Brodowski 2004-2006
    >> Report errors and bugs tohttp://bugs.opensuse.org, please.
    >> analyzing CPU 0:
    >> driver: centrino
    >> CPUs which need to switch frequency at the same time: 0
    >> hardware limits: 600 MHz - 1.70 GHz
    >> available frequency steps: 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.40 GHz, 1.20 GHz, 1000 MHz, 800 MHz, 600 MHz
    >> available cpufreq governors: conservative, ondemand, userspace, powersave, performance
    >> current policy: frequency should be within 600 MHz and 1.70 GHz.
    >> The governor "ondemand" may decide which speed to use
    >> within this range.
    >> current CPU frequency is 600 MHz.
    >> ----------- end snip -------------
    >>
    >> without power management this laptop would start smoking (ok I exagerate).
    >>
    >> --
    >> Mark

    >
    > Thanks for the pointers. I'm trying to figure out how to get the
    > probes turned on as you suggested.
    >
    > I'm working with YAST through the GUI and I'm not sure where to find
    > "sw_single" or "lm_sensors".
    >

    to clarify:

    to launch yast directly into the "software management" applet do
    #yast2 sw_single

    lm_sensors is the redhat name. In suse its called simply sensors
    #rpm -q sensors

    --
    Mark

  5. Re: My system halting...all by itself...help...

    On Sep 8, 10:59 pm, Randy Brick MacKenna
    wrote:
    > On Sep 8, 10:39 pm, Mark Pryor wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 18:46:34 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    > > > I'm a newbie...with another newbie problem.

    >
    > > > I boot my system up (openSUSE 10.2, with latest updates). I work in
    > > > GUI mode, non-root userid -- for about 15 minutes. Then, I hear two
    > > > beeps and a dialog pops up saying:

    >
    > > > Broadcast message from root: System is going down for a HALT
    > > > immediately.

    >
    > > > Then, it follows up on its threat -- and my system shuts down.

    >
    > > > It just started doing this today (I've been using openSUSE for about a
    > > > week now.).

    >
    > > > Please help me figure out how to stop this.

    >
    > > Here's a short list of the usual suspects:

    >
    > > -- Beagle and novel-zmd hogging resources (so uninstall them)

    >
    > > -- over-heating caused by runaway processes (see below)

    >
    > > -- over-heating from the weather

    >
    > > Go into Yast2 (sw_single) and see if lm_sensors is installed. Get it
    > > working by doing
    > > #sensors-detect (accept all defaults)

    >
    > > now profile your system and cpu temps and see if they are rising
    > > and triggering alarms.

    >
    > > Another good package for heat profiling is cpufrequtils. Install this too
    > > and run
    > > #cpufreq-info

    >
    > > thats a fast way to see if ondemand throttling is on by default and if its
    > > working properly.

    >
    > > On this notebook, I see this
    > > ---------------- cpufreq-info -------------
    > > tlviewer@hercules:~> cpufreq-info
    > > cpufrequtils 002: cpufreq-info (C) Dominik Brodowski 2004-2006
    > > Report errors and bugs tohttp://bugs.opensuse.org, please.
    > > analyzing CPU 0:
    > > driver: centrino
    > > CPUs which need to switch frequency at the same time: 0
    > > hardware limits: 600 MHz - 1.70 GHz
    > > available frequency steps: 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.40 GHz, 1.20 GHz, 1000 MHz, 800 MHz, 600 MHz
    > > available cpufreq governors: conservative, ondemand, userspace, powersave, performance
    > > current policy: frequency should be within 600 MHz and 1.70 GHz.
    > > The governor "ondemand" may decide which speed to use
    > > within this range.
    > > current CPU frequency is 600 MHz.
    > > ----------- end snip -------------

    >
    > > without power management this laptop would start smoking (ok I exagerate).

    >
    > > --
    > > Mark

    >
    > Thanks for the pointers. I'm trying to figure out how to get the
    > probes turned on as you suggested.
    >
    > I'm working with YAST through the GUI and I'm not sure where to find
    > "sw_single" or "lm_sensors".
    >
    > I didn't realize that this behavior (root calling for a halt) might be
    > hardware related. Today, we had a pretty bad lightening storm here --
    > one hit close enough that it tripped a few GFI outlets in the house.
    > This computer was turned off but plugged in at the time, but maybe
    > something in the power supply got knocked out of spec.
    >
    > Before this, the machine had no problems (and it runs pretty
    > cool...it's an older Celeron desktop).
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Randy


    Okay, I got the sensors thing working. And, I was very surprised to
    see that the CPU was at 100 (C) !! I'm surprised it didn't melt.

    So, I pulled the cover off the case -- and found that the CPU heatsink
    fan was not running. Strange...so I pulled the fan and checked it
    with my 12VDC bench supply, and found it was working fine. I
    reinstalled the fan and noticed that the fan would run until openSUSE
    got to a certain point in its boot sequence.

    I checked the boot log and found these lines:

    <4>ACPI: Transitioning device [FAN1] to D0
    <4>ACPI: Transitioning device [FAN1] to D0
    <6>ACPI: Fan [FAN1] (off)

    So, for some reason, power management is turning off the CPU fan! I
    went into the power scheme settings, and found that they were set to
    "acoustic performance". Yuck. I turned it instead to "high
    performance", which had active cooling enabled instead of passive.

    I saved my settings, and rebooted -- and once again openSUSE is
    turning off the fan, and that fan(off) statement is still in the boot
    log.

    How do I get openSUSE to leave my CPU fan alone, and not shut it off?

    Thanks,
    Randy


  6. Re: My system halting...all by itself...help...

    On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 21:17:24 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:

    > On Sep 8, 10:59 pm, Randy Brick MacKenna
    > wrote:
    >> On Sep 8, 10:39 pm, Mark Pryor wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 18:46:34 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    >> > > I'm a newbie...with another newbie problem.

    >>
    >> > > I boot my system up (openSUSE 10.2, with latest updates). I work in
    >> > > GUI mode, non-root userid -- for about 15 minutes. Then, I hear two
    >> > > beeps and a dialog pops up saying:

    >>
    >> > > Broadcast message from root: System is going down for a HALT
    >> > > immediately.

    >>
    >> > > Then, it follows up on its threat -- and my system shuts down.

    >>
    >> > > It just started doing this today (I've been using openSUSE for about a
    >> > > week now.).

    >>


    >> Thanks for the pointers. I'm trying to figure out how to get the
    >> probes turned on as you suggested.
    >>
    >> I'm working with YAST through the GUI and I'm not sure where to find
    >> "sw_single" or "lm_sensors".
    >>
    >> I didn't realize that this behavior (root calling for a halt) might be
    >> hardware related. Today, we had a pretty bad lightening storm here --
    >> one hit close enough that it tripped a few GFI outlets in the house.
    >> This computer was turned off but plugged in at the time, but maybe
    >> something in the power supply got knocked out of spec.
    >>
    >> Before this, the machine had no problems (and it runs pretty
    >> cool...it's an older Celeron desktop).
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Randy

    >
    > Okay, I got the sensors thing working. And, I was very surprised to
    > see that the CPU was at 100 (C) !! I'm surprised it didn't melt.
    >
    > So, I pulled the cover off the case -- and found that the CPU heatsink
    > fan was not running. Strange...so I pulled the fan and checked it
    > with my 12VDC bench supply, and found it was working fine. I
    > reinstalled the fan and noticed that the fan would run until openSUSE
    > got to a certain point in its boot sequence.
    >
    > I checked the boot log and found these lines:
    >
    > <4>ACPI: Transitioning device [FAN1] to D0
    > <4>ACPI: Transitioning device [FAN1] to D0
    > <6>ACPI: Fan [FAN1] (off)
    >
    > So, for some reason, power management is turning off the CPU fan! I
    > went into the power scheme settings, and found that they were set to
    > "acoustic performance". Yuck. I turned it instead to "high
    > performance", which had active cooling enabled instead of passive.
    >
    > I saved my settings, and rebooted -- and once again openSUSE is
    > turning off the fan, and that fan(off) statement is still in the boot
    > log.
    >
    > How do I get openSUSE to leave my CPU fan alone, and not shut it off?


    Try and move the (3-pin) fan plug to another MB header or use a 3-pin to
    4-pin convertor and run the CPU fan directly from the PSU. This will most
    likely involve changing some bios settings so that the CPU fan header is
    ignored on boot.

    Could it be that the OS is not shutting down your fan, but telling you that
    it's off?

    You can look in the settings for kPowersave, but I've never seen any
    feature in there for fan control.

    --
    Mark

  7. Re: My system halting...all by itself...help...

    On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 21:17:24 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:

    > On Sep 8, 10:59 pm, Randy Brick MacKenna
    > wrote:
    >> On Sep 8, 10:39 pm, Mark Pryor wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 18:46:34 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    >> > > I'm a newbie...with another newbie problem.

    >>
    >> > > I boot my system up (openSUSE 10.2, with latest updates). I work in
    >> > > GUI mode, non-root userid -- for about 15 minutes. Then, I hear two
    >> > > beeps and a dialog pops up saying:

    >>
    >> > > Broadcast message from root: System is going down for a HALT
    >> > > immediately.

    >>
    >> > > Then, it follows up on its threat -- and my system shuts down.

    >>
    >> > > It just started doing this today (I've been using openSUSE for about a
    >> > > week now.).

    >>
    >> > > Please help me figure out how to stop this.

    >>

    Another obvious suggestion which may be overlooked (since there was a
    power surge), is reset your bios:

    --remove AC from PSU
    --hit the ON button (releases static)
    --find the "clear CMOS" header and short the pins
    --remove short from CMOS header
    --reconnect AC
    --turn on, enter bios, and "set optimal defaults"

    --
    Mark

  8. Re: My system halting...all by itself...help...

    On Sep 9, 12:44 am, Mark Pryor wrote:
    > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 21:17:24 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    > > On Sep 8, 10:59 pm, Randy Brick MacKenna
    > > wrote:
    > >> On Sep 8, 10:39 pm, Mark Pryor wrote:

    >
    > >> > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 18:46:34 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    > >> > > I'm a newbie...with another newbie problem.

    >
    > >> > > I boot my system up (openSUSE 10.2, with latest updates). I work in
    > >> > > GUI mode, non-root userid -- for about 15 minutes. Then, I hear two
    > >> > > beeps and a dialog pops up saying:

    >
    > >> > > Broadcast message from root: System is going down for a HALT
    > >> > > immediately.

    >
    > >> > > Then, it follows up on its threat -- and my system shuts down.

    >
    > >> > > It just started doing this today (I've been using openSUSE for about a
    > >> > > week now.).

    >
    > >> Thanks for the pointers. I'm trying to figure out how to get the
    > >> probes turned on as you suggested.

    >
    > >> I'm working with YAST through the GUI and I'm not sure where to find
    > >> "sw_single" or "lm_sensors".

    >
    > >> I didn't realize that this behavior (root calling for a halt) might be
    > >> hardware related. Today, we had a pretty bad lightening storm here --
    > >> one hit close enough that it tripped a few GFI outlets in the house.
    > >> This computer was turned off but plugged in at the time, but maybe
    > >> something in the power supply got knocked out of spec.

    >
    > >> Before this, the machine had no problems (and it runs pretty
    > >> cool...it's an older Celeron desktop).

    >
    > >> Thanks,
    > >> Randy

    >
    > > Okay, I got the sensors thing working. And, I was very surprised to
    > > see that the CPU was at 100 (C) !! I'm surprised it didn't melt.

    >
    > > So, I pulled the cover off the case -- and found that the CPU heatsink
    > > fan was not running. Strange...so I pulled the fan and checked it
    > > with my 12VDC bench supply, and found it was working fine. I
    > > reinstalled the fan and noticed that the fan would run until openSUSE
    > > got to a certain point in its boot sequence.

    >
    > > I checked the boot log and found these lines:

    >
    > > <4>ACPI: Transitioning device [FAN1] to D0
    > > <4>ACPI: Transitioning device [FAN1] to D0
    > > <6>ACPI: Fan [FAN1] (off)

    >
    > > So, for some reason, power management is turning off the CPU fan! I
    > > went into the power scheme settings, and found that they were set to
    > > "acoustic performance". Yuck. I turned it instead to "high
    > > performance", which had active cooling enabled instead of passive.

    >
    > > I saved my settings, and rebooted -- and once again openSUSE is
    > > turning off the fan, and that fan(off) statement is still in the boot
    > > log.

    >
    > > How do I get openSUSE to leave my CPU fan alone, and not shut it off?

    >
    > Try and move the (3-pin) fan plug to another MB header or use a 3-pin to
    > 4-pin convertor and run the CPU fan directly from the PSU. This will most
    > likely involve changing some bios settings so that the CPU fan header is
    > ignored on boot.
    >
    > Could it be that the OS is not shutting down your fan, but telling you that
    > it's off?
    >
    > You can look in the settings for kPowersave, but I've never seen any
    > feature in there for fan control.
    >
    > --
    > Mark


    Thanks...yes I was thinking the same way. BIOS on this machine does
    not allow boot unless it detects fan rotation (via the tach wire), so
    I think I'd have to just leave the black & white wires on the fan
    connector header, and hardware +12V to the red fan wire. That should
    both power the fan and convince BIOS that it is running.

    BUT....I found something interesting. I believe I have ACPI
    configured correctly, however there is something very wrong with the
    parameters it is using. The way it is supposed to work (even with
    active cooling) is to turn the fan on when a temperature set point has
    been reached. The disturbing thing is, when I did this command:

    cat /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/*

    it returns:

    cooling mode: passive
    polling frequency: 2 seconds
    state: passive active[0]
    temperature: -268 C
    critical (S5): -264 C
    passive: -273 C: tc1=0 tc2=0 tsp=600
    devices=0xcfcdc2c0
    active[0]: -267 C: devices=0xcfcdc798

    which seems very odd. I'd expect it to show "active" (since that's
    what I set it as), and it should have temp set points of around +50C

    Something is definitely wrong with my ACPI under openSUSE...I just
    don't know how to fix it...

    -Randy


  9. Re: My system halting...all by itself...help...

    On Sep 9, 1:05 am, Randy Brick MacKenna
    wrote:
    > On Sep 9, 12:44 am, Mark Pryor wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 21:17:24 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    > > > On Sep 8, 10:59 pm, Randy Brick MacKenna
    > > > wrote:
    > > >> On Sep 8, 10:39 pm, Mark Pryor wrote:

    >
    > > >> > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 18:46:34 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    > > >> > > I'm a newbie...with another newbie problem.

    >
    > > >> > > I boot my system up (openSUSE 10.2, with latest updates). I work in
    > > >> > > GUI mode, non-root userid -- for about 15 minutes. Then, I hear two
    > > >> > > beeps and a dialog pops up saying:

    >
    > > >> > > Broadcast message from root: System is going down for a HALT
    > > >> > > immediately.

    >
    > > >> > > Then, it follows up on its threat -- and my system shuts down.

    >
    > > >> > > It just started doing this today (I've been using openSUSE for about a
    > > >> > > week now.).

    >
    > > >> Thanks for the pointers. I'm trying to figure out how to get the
    > > >> probes turned on as you suggested.

    >
    > > >> I'm working with YAST through the GUI and I'm not sure where to find
    > > >> "sw_single" or "lm_sensors".

    >
    > > >> I didn't realize that this behavior (root calling for a halt) might be
    > > >> hardware related. Today, we had a pretty bad lightening storm here --
    > > >> one hit close enough that it tripped a few GFI outlets in the house.
    > > >> This computer was turned off but plugged in at the time, but maybe
    > > >> something in the power supply got knocked out of spec.

    >
    > > >> Before this, the machine had no problems (and it runs pretty
    > > >> cool...it's an older Celeron desktop).

    >
    > > >> Thanks,
    > > >> Randy

    >
    > > > Okay, I got the sensors thing working. And, I was very surprised to
    > > > see that the CPU was at 100 (C) !! I'm surprised it didn't melt.

    >
    > > > So, I pulled the cover off the case -- and found that the CPU heatsink
    > > > fan was not running. Strange...so I pulled the fan and checked it
    > > > with my 12VDC bench supply, and found it was working fine. I
    > > > reinstalled the fan and noticed that the fan would run until openSUSE
    > > > got to a certain point in its boot sequence.

    >
    > > > I checked the boot log and found these lines:

    >
    > > > <4>ACPI: Transitioning device [FAN1] to D0
    > > > <4>ACPI: Transitioning device [FAN1] to D0
    > > > <6>ACPI: Fan [FAN1] (off)

    >
    > > > So, for some reason, power management is turning off the CPU fan! I
    > > > went into the power scheme settings, and found that they were set to
    > > > "acoustic performance". Yuck. I turned it instead to "high
    > > > performance", which had active cooling enabled instead of passive.

    >
    > > > I saved my settings, and rebooted -- and once again openSUSE is
    > > > turning off the fan, and that fan(off) statement is still in the boot
    > > > log.

    >
    > > > How do I get openSUSE to leave my CPU fan alone, and not shut it off?

    >
    > > Try and move the (3-pin) fan plug to another MB header or use a 3-pin to
    > > 4-pin convertor and run the CPU fan directly from the PSU. This will most
    > > likely involve changing some bios settings so that the CPU fan header is
    > > ignored on boot.

    >
    > > Could it be that the OS is not shutting down your fan, but telling you that
    > > it's off?

    >
    > > You can look in the settings for kPowersave, but I've never seen any
    > > feature in there for fan control.

    >
    > > --
    > > Mark

    >
    > Thanks...yes I was thinking the same way. BIOS on this machine does
    > not allow boot unless it detects fan rotation (via the tach wire), so
    > I think I'd have to just leave the black & white wires on the fan
    > connector header, and hardware +12V to the red fan wire. That should
    > both power the fan and convince BIOS that it is running.
    >
    > BUT....I found something interesting. I believe I have ACPI
    > configured correctly, however there is something very wrong with the
    > parameters it is using. The way it is supposed to work (even with
    > active cooling) is to turn the fan on when a temperature set point has
    > been reached. The disturbing thing is, when I did this command:
    >
    > cat /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/*
    >
    > it returns:
    >
    > cooling mode: passive
    > polling frequency: 2 seconds
    > state: passive active[0]
    > temperature: -268 C
    > critical (S5): -264 C
    > passive: -273 C: tc1=0 tc2=0 tsp=600
    > devices=0xcfcdc2c0
    > active[0]: -267 C: devices=0xcfcdc798
    >
    > which seems very odd. I'd expect it to show "active" (since that's
    > what I set it as), and it should have temp set points of around +50C
    >
    > Something is definitely wrong with my ACPI under openSUSE...I just
    > don't know how to fix it...
    >
    > -Randy


    Well, after another couple of hours, I figured out how to "fix" my
    problem -- I modified the boot loader so that ACPI is set to 'off'.
    Now, the fan runs all the time. I'm missing the other features that
    ACPI afforded, but on this desktop machine that I plan on using as a
    simple fileserver/webserver that's not a huge problem.

    I'm pretty surprised by all of this. I never explicitly asked for
    ACPI to be turned on, so I'm assuming that it was activated as part of
    the openSUSE default distro settings. This system has been far from
    stable, out of the box. In fact, about half the time it hangs on
    boot. My next move is to eliminate all other services/processes I
    don't absolutely need. Maybe that will help it become more stable.

    -Randy


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