problems with hardware clock -- it's stuck - Suse

This is a discussion on problems with hardware clock -- it's stuck - Suse ; Hi, I'm an absolute newbie...just installed openSUSE 10.2 I really like it so far -- but have one issue that I'm not sure how to solve When I shut the computer down, one of the cleanup activities openSUSE does is ...

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Thread: problems with hardware clock -- it's stuck

  1. problems with hardware clock -- it's stuck

    Hi, I'm an absolute newbie...just installed openSUSE 10.2

    I really like it so far -- but have one issue that I'm not sure how to
    solve

    When I shut the computer down, one of the cleanup activities openSUSE
    does is to attempt to set the hardware clock to the current system
    time. This fails on my computer with the message:

    set hardware clock to the current system time timeselect() to dev/
    rtc clock tick timed out.

    Also, when booting the system I get a similar failure:

    setting up the hardware clock clockselect() to dev/rtc clock tick
    timed out

    My system clock (the operating system clock, not the hardware clock)
    becomes inaccurate between shut-down and reboot. If the desktop says
    "2:30PM", and I shut the system down and wait for 10 minutes, if I
    boot it back up it will show "2:30PM" again -- completely losing the
    10 minutes of time while the system was powered down. It actually
    just stays stuck at "2:30PM". This also indicates to me that openSUSE
    is able to read the system time from the hardware clock (albeit, the
    wrong time).

    That hardware clock is just not keeping time when the system is turned
    off.

    Can this be a sign of a dead CMOS battery? I thought that if the
    battery were dead, it would always default back to some time-zero
    state (like 12:00 on 01-01-1980). This machine is not doing that --
    it is staying stuck at whatever time I last set the hardware clock to,
    via the BIOS utility.

    Any advice or pointers to how to try to troubleshoot/fix this would be
    appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Randy


  2. Re: problems with hardware clock -- it's stuck

    Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:

    ---------------snip------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Can this be a sign of a dead CMOS battery? I thought that if the
    > battery were dead, it would always default back to some time-zero
    > state (like 12:00 on 01-01-1980). This machine is not doing that --
    > it is staying stuck at whatever time I last set the hardware clock to,
    > via the BIOS utility.
    >
    > Any advice or pointers to how to try to troubleshoot/fix this would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Randy


    Use Yast to set up the network time protocol daemon (ntpd).

    -> Yast -> Network Services -> NTP Configuration -> Automatically Start NTP
    Daemon (x)During Boot (unless this isn't feasible) -> (x) Use random
    server from pool.ntp.org. Click the 'Test' button to make sure everything
    is o.k. -> Finish

    As for the bios battery, if you reboot after the above and still get
    warnings then it 'may' be a bad battery but not likely, unless your board
    is at least 5 or 6 years old. Though we can't rule it out.

  3. Re: problems with hardware clock -- it's stuck

    On Sep 5, 8:26 pm, Michael Soibelman
    wrote:
    > Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    >
    > ---------------snip------------------------------------------------
    >
    >
    >
    > > Can this be a sign of a dead CMOS battery? I thought that if the
    > > battery were dead, it would always default back to some time-zero
    > > state (like 12:00 on 01-01-1980). This machine is not doing that --
    > > it is staying stuck at whatever time I last set the hardware clock to,
    > > via the BIOS utility.

    >
    > > Any advice or pointers to how to try to troubleshoot/fix this would be
    > > appreciated.

    >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Randy

    >
    > Use Yast to set up the network time protocol daemon (ntpd).
    >
    > -> Yast -> Network Services -> NTP Configuration -> Automatically Start NTP
    > Daemon (x)During Boot (unless this isn't feasible) -> (x) Use random
    > server from pool.ntp.org. Click the 'Test' button to make sure everything
    > is o.k. -> Finish
    >
    > As for the bios battery, if you reboot after the above and still get
    > warnings then it 'may' be a bad battery but not likely, unless your board
    > is at least 5 or 6 years old. Though we can't rule it out.


    I actually have the line:
    server pool.ntp.org
    in my /etc/ntp.conf. That keeps my clock honest.

    Back to your original problem, you don't say what make and model (+
    age) the laptop is. Laptops vary widely. At a guess you have a
    Thinkpad or a Dell - https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+s....15/+bug/43661
    describes a similar bug with a thinkpad where ntp did not even help,
    and http://linux.derkeiler.com/Mailing-L...5-04/4968.html
    describes a fix with a Dell.

    Assuming your problem is the same as theirs, you need to update /etc/
    rc.d/boot.clock (take a backup of that script first!!)
    Where you see /sbin/hwclock, add the flag '--directisa' to the line
    each time, some time before the $HWCLOCK part.
    All rather horrific and I don't see any place you could do that with
    YaST.


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