Disk quota limits?? - Suse

This is a discussion on Disk quota limits?? - Suse ; Hi all, Recently installed a SUSE 10.2 system on my PC and want to try and transfer my media files (about 30G of MP3) to my new server. I created /usr/local/music and used Samba to export it so I could ...

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Thread: Disk quota limits??

  1. Disk quota limits??

    Hi all,

    Recently installed a SUSE 10.2 system on my PC and want to try and
    transfer my media files (about 30G of MP3) to my new server. I
    created /usr/local/music and used Samba to export it so I could copy
    my media across from my WinXP laptop.

    This was going fine until I got about 18G of stuff across and then the
    copy just stalled. I re-started it but it stopped at 18G again. I
    checked the file it halted at and it was OK - no corruptions
    (according to Windows). I rebooted both machines and tried again but
    it still stalled at 18G.

    I think I have run into some kind of disk quota limit as I did the
    copy as my regular user login (via SMB) and not root. Does this sound
    feasible?
    If so, how do I adjust the limits? I had a quick look through the
    options in YaST but couldn't see anytning that I thought was
    appropriate.

    TIA,

    Richard.


  2. Re: Disk quota limits??

    Rico wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > Recently installed a SUSE 10.2 system on my PC and want to try and
    > transfer my media files (about 30G of MP3) to my new server. I
    > created /usr/local/music and used Samba to export it so I could copy
    > my media across from my WinXP laptop.
    >
    > This was going fine until I got about 18G of stuff across and then the
    > copy just stalled. I re-started it but it stopped at 18G again. I
    > checked the file it halted at and it was OK - no corruptions
    > (according to Windows). I rebooted both machines and tried again but
    > it still stalled at 18G.
    >
    > I think I have run into some kind of disk quota limit as I did the
    > copy as my regular user login (via SMB) and not root. Does this sound
    > feasible?
    > If so, how do I adjust the limits? I had a quick look through the
    > options in YaST but couldn't see anytning that I thought was
    > appropriate.


    How big is the partition that your /usr is mounted on? Mine is only
    21Gb, and some of that is already used up. I'm guessing you are filling
    that partition and then the transfer stops.

    Do the following....
    Open a terminal
    cd /usr
    df -kh . (don't miss the dot on the end)


    What is in the 'Size' column, and how much is in the 'Avail' column. My
    guess is that the 'Avail' column is about 18Gb? If that's the case,
    then there is your problem. Try copying the files to the /home
    partition where you should have more space to play with.

  3. Re: Disk quota limits??

    On Sep 4, 10:13 am, Rico wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > Recently installed a SUSE 10.2 system on my PC and want to try and
    > transfer my media files (about 30G of MP3) to my new server. I
    > created /usr/local/music and used Samba to export it so I could copy
    > my media across from my WinXP laptop.
    >
    > This was going fine until I got about 18G of stuff across and then the
    > copy just stalled. I re-started it but it stopped at 18G again. I
    > checked the file it halted at and it was OK - no corruptions
    > (according to Windows). I rebooted both machines and tried again but
    > it still stalled at 18G.
    >
    > I think I have run into some kind of disk quota limit as I did the
    > copy as my regular user login (via SMB) and not root. Does this sound
    > feasible?
    > If so, how do I adjust the limits? I had a quick look through the
    > options in YaST but couldn't see anytning that I thought was
    > appropriate.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Richard.


    Why put them in the /usr tree? That is for software not essential to
    boot/maintain the system (executable binaries, scripts). (The stuff
    needed to boot is in /bin and /sbin). The /usr tree can normally only
    written to by root for security reasons.
    You should be putting the stuff you describe in your /home hierarchy
    and not logging in as root unless you really need to.
    Then I agree with class_a.


  4. Re: Disk quota limits??

    Thanks for the input. Follow up info:

    I put it under /usr as I have several users and network streaming
    devices which will need access to it and didn't want to give
    permissions on my home directory.

    Everything is one large ~180G partition. 200G drive, less partition
    table, swap space and other stuff that you always seem to lose on
    these things. So about 10% of the drive has been used by my user
    account.

    TIA,

    Richard.


  5. Re: Disk quota limits??

    On Sep 4, 1:52 pm, Rico wrote:
    > Thanks for the input. Follow up info:
    >
    > I put it under /usr as I have several users and network streaming
    > devices which will need access to it and didn't want to give
    > permissions on my home directory.
    >
    > Everything is one large ~180G partition. 200G drive, less partition
    > table, swap space and other stuff that you always seem to lose on
    > these things. So about 10% of the drive has been used by my user
    > account.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Richard.


    ok, I still think you should create another directory in your /home
    tree (presumably by creating another user-account there and letting
    your visitors use that) but that is not the real problem here.
    It will not be quotas, they are not turned on by default.
    What filesystem are you using? Even though I can't remember any
    restrictions nowadays.
    You don't have 'max disk size' set to 18000 in smb.conf? ;-)
    My guess is Samba, try looking at your logs in /var/log/samba/ and see
    if anything is there. You might have to set 'debug level = 1' or
    'debug level = 2' first.


  6. Place to put media files (was:Re: Disk quota limits??)

    Vlad_Inhaler wrote:

    > Why put them in the /usr tree? That is for software not essential to
    > boot/maintain the system (executable binaries, scripts).


    Hello Vlad,

    I have ripped my CD's in .ogg and put them under /usr/share/music.
    My question: what would be the FHS compliant place to put these files, so
    that all users on this system can read them?

    With regards,
    Hendric
    --
    Hendric Stattmann, Mödling, Austria. Registered Linux User #178879

  7. Re: Place to put media files

    Hendric Stattmann wrote:
    > Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    >
    >> Why put them in the /usr tree? That is for software not essential to
    >> boot/maintain the system (executable binaries, scripts).

    >
    > Hello Vlad,
    >
    > I have ripped my CD's in .ogg and put them under /usr/share/music.
    > My question: what would be the FHS compliant place to put these files, so
    > that all users on this system can read them?


    There is no FHS compliant place when it comes to user created
    content. However /usr/share is a good place for common things... so
    perhaps /usr/local/share would be a good place for things you
    want to make sure are kept separate from system common things.

    So...
    /usr/local/share/music perhaps?

    I store mine at:
    /data3/My Music/mp3
    /data3/My Music/ogg

    (just to show you it doesn't really matter much)

    If the filesystem is going to be exported and mounted
    across systems, I prefer to have "export" in the path.
    So I might place things at:

    /export/music

    or perhaps

    /usr/local/export/music

    But again, this falls outside of FHS AFAIK... you have
    a lot of leeway.

  8. Re: Place to put media files (was:Re: Disk quota limits??)

    On Sep 4, 10:29 pm, Hendric Stattmann
    wrote:
    > Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    > > Why put them in the /usr tree? That is for software not essential to
    > > boot/maintain the system (executable binaries, scripts).

    >
    > Hello Vlad,
    >
    > I have ripped my CD's in .ogg and put them under /usr/share/music.
    > My question: what would be the FHS compliant place to put these files, so
    > that all users on this system can read them?
    >
    > With regards,
    > Hendric
    > --
    > Hendric Stattmann, Mödling, Austria. Registered Linux User #178879


    Murks, falsche Adresse benutzt?
    I'd create a new user (music?) with a home directory of /home/music
    and put the stuff there.
    An alternative would be /var/music, you could create user 'music' with
    a home-directory of /var/music.

    Normally /home is user data which is what you have here.
    /var is system data (rpm database, system backups, logs . . .), not
    really appropriate
    /usr and /opt are executable stuff, /lib . . . guess!
    /etc is configs
    /bin and /sbin are essential executables.
    (/etc, /bin and /sbin *have* *to* *be* on the root partition because
    the stuff they contain is necessary to load and point to other
    partitions)

    How are 'all users' going to access them?
    Samba? You could have a read-only no-password share 'music' pointing
    to /home/music
    Web server? Have not done that for almost 10 years now but that
    should work in a similar fashion.

    I am still curious as to why Samba imposed that 18GB limit. If you
    managed to copy the CDs in via other means then it is a Samba problem
    and not a filesystem restriction.


  9. Re: Place to put media files (was:Re: Disk quota limits??)


    >
    > I am still curious as to why Samba imposed that 18GB limit. If you
    > managed to copy the CDs in via other means then it is a Samba problem
    > and not a filesystem restriction.


    I ripped another CD into WAV format so I had some nice big files and I
    could copy those into /usr/local/music without any problems, so it
    looks like a Samba restriction.

    I checked my smb.conf file and there is nothing in there that
    indicates a restriction on disk size. Bit of a bummer as I was hoping
    to use my SUSE 10.2 box as a media streamer and not have to resort to
    Windows :-(

    I'll go ask the Samba guys of they have any ideas.

    Thanks,

    Richard.


  10. Re: Place to put media files (was:Re: Disk quota limits??)

    On Sep 4, 11:49 pm, Rico wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > I am still curious as to why Samba imposed that 18GB limit. If you
    > > managed to copy the CDs in via other means then it is a Samba problem
    > > and not a filesystem restriction.

    >
    > I ripped another CD into WAV format so I had some nice big files and I
    > could copy those into /usr/local/music without any problems, so it
    > looks like a Samba restriction.
    >
    > I checked my smb.conf file and there is nothing in there that
    > indicates a restriction on disk size. Bit of a bummer as I was hoping
    > to use my SUSE 10.2 box as a media streamer and not have to resort to
    > Windows :-(
    >
    > I'll go ask the Samba guys of they have any ideas.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Richard.


    debug level = 2
    look at the logs. Samba should be saying why it is refusing to write
    more.
    One thing, I thought that this machine was your personal 'toy'. If
    someone else administrates it then it is conceivable that they turned
    quotas on.


  11. Re: Place to put media files (was:Re: Disk quota limits??)

    On Sep 4, 11:35 pm, Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    > On Sep 4, 11:49 pm, Rico wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >

    >
    > > > I am still curious as to why Samba imposed that 18GB limit. If you
    > > > managed to copy the CDs in via other means then it is a Samba problem
    > > > and not a filesystem restriction.

    >
    > > I ripped another CD into WAV format so I had some nice big files and I
    > > could copy those into /usr/local/music without any problems, so it
    > > looks like a Samba restriction.

    >
    > > I checked my smb.conf file and there is nothing in there that
    > > indicates a restriction on disk size. Bit of a bummer as I was hoping
    > > to use my SUSE 10.2 box as a media streamer and not have to resort to
    > > Windows :-(

    >
    > > I'll go ask the Samba guys of they have any ideas.

    >
    > > Thanks,

    >
    > > Richard.

    >
    > debug level = 2
    > look at the logs. Samba should be saying why it is refusing to write
    > more.
    > One thing, I thought that this machine was your personal 'toy'. If
    > someone else administrates it then it is conceivable that they turned
    > quotas on.


    Hi again,

    Thanks to everyone who posted. I appreciate your comments and thanks
    for putting up with my basic questions - it's how we all learn, right?

    ANyway the fix turns out that Samba (whatever the default SUSE10.2
    version is) seems to have a hard coded limit of 10% of the filesystem
    size for any share. I edited my smb.conf and added
    max disk size 0
    to disable this.

    I continued my copy and everything is working as I would expect.

    Thanks again,

    Richard.


  12. Re: Place to put media files (was:Re: Disk quota limits??)

    On Sep 5, 1:38 pm, Rico wrote:
    > On Sep 4, 11:35 pm, Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    >
    >
    > Hi again,
    >
    >
    > ANyway the fix turns out that Samba (whatever the default SUSE10.2
    > version is) seems to have a hard coded limit of 10% of the filesystem
    > size for any share. I edited my smb.conf and added
    > max disk size 0
    > to disable this.
    >
    > I continued my copy and everything is working as I would expect.
    >
    > Thanks again,
    >
    > Richard.


    Extremely strange.
    Firstly: the default for that parameter is supposed to be zero anyway
    Secondly: It is supposed to only influence the amount of disc space
    which is *reported* back to the client, it is not supposed to impose
    any restrictions on what you can actually use.
    (thirdly: it is supposed to be 'max disk size = 0', but you probably
    got that right in the config anyway)


  13. Re: Place to put media files

    Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    > On Sep 4, 10:29 pm, Hendric Stattmann
    > wrote:
    >> Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    >>> Why put them in the /usr tree? That is for software not essential to
    >>> boot/maintain the system (executable binaries, scripts).

    >> Hello Vlad,
    >>
    >> I have ripped my CD's in .ogg and put them under /usr/share/music.
    >> My question: what would be the FHS compliant place to put these files, so
    >> that all users on this system can read them?
    >>
    >> With regards,
    >> Hendric
    >> --
    >> Hendric Stattmann, Mödling, Austria. Registered Linux User #178879

    >
    > Murks, falsche Adresse benutzt?
    > I'd create a new user (music?) with a home directory of /home/music
    > and put the stuff there.
    > An alternative would be /var/music, you could create user 'music' with
    > a home-directory of /var/music.
    >
    > Normally /home is user data which is what you have here.
    > /var is system data (rpm database, system backups, logs . . .), not
    > really appropriate
    > /usr and /opt are executable stuff, /lib . . . guess!
    > /etc is configs
    > /bin and /sbin are essential executables.
    > (/etc, /bin and /sbin *have* *to* *be* on the root partition because
    > the stuff they contain is necessary to load and point to other
    > partitions)
    >
    > How are 'all users' going to access them?
    > Samba? You could have a read-only no-password share 'music' pointing
    > to /home/music
    > Web server? Have not done that for almost 10 years now but that
    > should work in a similar fashion.
    >
    > I am still curious as to why Samba imposed that 18GB limit. If you
    > managed to copy the CDs in via other means then it is a Samba problem
    > and not a filesystem restriction.
    >


    Personally I have my music on different partition. mount it in
    /media/music and create samba and NFS shares to it with read only access
    for the family and R/W for myself.

    Ram

  14. Re: Place to put media files (was:Re: Disk quota limits??)

    On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 22:29:31 +0200, Hendric Stattmann wrote:

    > Vlad_Inhaler wrote:
    >
    >> Why put them in the /usr tree? That is for software not essential to
    >> boot/maintain the system (executable binaries, scripts).

    >
    > Hello Vlad,
    >
    > I have ripped my CD's in .ogg and put them under /usr/share/music.
    > My question: what would be the FHS compliant place to put these files, so
    > that all users on this system can read them?
    >
    > With regards,
    > Hendric


    Two places come to mind: /home or /srv
    On my desktop I store music in /home/music and have set up permissions on
    the directory like so:
    ls -ld /home/music/
    drwxrwsr-t 33 root mp3 4096 Sep 7 23:41 /home/music/

    The s on the group permission means that all files and directories created
    in /home/music will be owned by group mp3. Users that are members of group
    mp3 are allowed to create files and folders. All users may read the folder
    tree. The final t in the permissions block users from deleting files owned
    by someone else. To get that combination use (as root)

    mkdir /home/music
    chown root:mp3 /home/music # you need to create group mp3 first
    chmod g+ws,o+t /home/music

    If you are storing music on a server, use /srv/music as the fsstd
    specifies this as:

    srv Data for services provided by this system

    Typically you can export /srv/music using any or all of samba, ftp, rsync,
    http, nfs or streaming servers. If you use automount for home directories,
    you can put an entry into auto.home like so:

    music musicserver:/srv/music
    * homeserver:/srv/home/&

    On your desktop /home/music mounts from /srv/music on musicserver, while
    other home directories come from homeserver. In /etc/hosts you define the
    aliases:

    192.168.0.12 thumper homeserver musicserver

    assuming your server is called thumper. By using an alias, you can move
    things later. Say you get a new server just for music called jukebox:

    192.168.0.12 thumper homeserver
    192.168.0.13 jukebox musicserver

    Hope this helps!

    regards,
    Frank Ranner

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