New to Linux - Cheap Raid config? - Suse

This is a discussion on New to Linux - Cheap Raid config? - Suse ; Hi, I'm a longtime compsci person, but now just getting the chance/ free time to learn Linux. I've got a spare PC to play around with -- and I bought a book with a DVD distro of openSUSE 10.1 included ...

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Thread: New to Linux - Cheap Raid config?

  1. New to Linux - Cheap Raid config?

    Hi, I'm a longtime compsci person, but now just getting the chance/
    free time to learn Linux. I've got a spare PC to play around with --
    and I bought a book with a DVD distro of openSUSE 10.1 included with
    it.

    I'd like to configure the PC with RAID, since one of the things I'd
    like to use this box for is a household NAS -- for storing photos and
    music.

    If I have a couple of brand new W.D. 160G SATA drives, and I buy this
    el-cheapo SATA controller:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16815104219

    do you think I'll be able to successfully install the OS and get RAID
    1 configured? Some of the write-in reviews on this controller card
    said that folks were able to get it working easily under SUSE...so I
    was encouraged by that.

    Anything to watch out for, or alternatives to consider?

    Also, is my backup strategy sensible? I plan on storing documents,
    photos, etc. on my office desktop computer -- and using backup
    software to copy it to the Linux machine every evening.

    Thanks
    Randy


  2. Re: New to Linux - Cheap Raid config?

    On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 19:50:16 -0400, Randy Brick MacKenna
    wrote:

    > Hi, I'm a longtime compsci person, but now just getting the chance/
    > free time to learn Linux. I've got a spare PC to play around with --
    > and I bought a book with a DVD distro of openSUSE 10.1 included with
    > it.
    >
    > I'd like to configure the PC with RAID, since one of the things I'd
    > like to use this box for is a household NAS -- for storing photos and
    > music.
    >
    > If I have a couple of brand new W.D. 160G SATA drives, and I buy this
    > el-cheapo SATA controller:
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16815104219
    >
    > do you think I'll be able to successfully install the OS and get RAID
    > 1 configured? Some of the write-in reviews on this controller card
    > said that folks were able to get it working easily under SUSE...so I
    > was encouraged by that.
    >
    > Anything to watch out for, or alternatives to consider?
    >
    > Also, is my backup strategy sensible? I plan on storing documents,
    > photos, etc. on my office desktop computer -- and using backup
    > software to copy it to the Linux machine every evening.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Randy
    >

    dump the 10.1 and dl 10.2 it's much better


    --
    OpenSuse 10.2 x64, KDE 3.5, Opera 9.x weekly

  3. Re: New to Linux - Cheap Raid config?

    On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 16:50:16 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:

    > Hi, I'm a longtime compsci person, but now just getting the chance/
    > free time to learn Linux. I've got a spare PC to play around with --
    > and I bought a book with a DVD distro of openSUSE 10.1 included with
    > it.
    >
    > I'd like to configure the PC with RAID, since one of the things I'd
    > like to use this box for is a household NAS -- for storing photos and
    > music.
    >
    > If I have a couple of brand new W.D. 160G SATA drives, and I buy this
    > el-cheapo SATA controller:
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16815104219
    >
    > do you think I'll be able to successfully install the OS and get RAID
    > 1 configured? Some of the write-in reviews on this controller card
    > said that folks were able to get it working easily under SUSE...so I
    > was encouraged by that.
    >


    that addin device uses a SiI 3512 chip for fakeraid. If you plan to dual
    boot with Windows your plans may differ than going SuSE only.

    If this is your first time installing Linux/OpenSuSE then you might miss
    alot of the decision points needed to get up and running. In order to
    simplify installing the OS consider configuring the fakeraid _after_
    OpenSuSE is installed on another drive. Booting from a fakeraid array can
    be very complicated, but using it as a slave is comparatively easy.
    Let me repeat, its much easier booting the OS from a non-raid drive.

    If you are determined to boot from the OS installed on fakeraid, then I
    suggest getting familiar with the CLI on a Live distro that includes
    the dmraid tools. Do this before your install.

    Your fakeraid will showup in
    #dmraid -s

    as sii_xxyyxxxyy
    also do
    #ls -l /dev/mapper/ or
    #fdisk -l /dev/mapper/sii_xxxyy (fill in the exact device name)

    your card should have a raid bios where you will setup your array. If you
    don't setup it up there first then dmraid tools will see nothing.

    Don't be alarmed at the term fakeraid. It's a Linux thing.

    --
    Mark

  4. Re: New to Linux - Cheap Raid config?

    On Aug 20, 11:18 pm, Mark Pryor wrote:
    > On Fri, 10 Aug 2007 16:50:16 -0700, Randy Brick MacKenna wrote:
    > > Hi, I'm a longtime compsci person, but now just getting the chance/
    > > free time to learn Linux. I've got a spare PC to play around with --
    > > and I bought a book with a DVD distro of openSUSE 10.1 included with
    > > it.

    >
    > > I'd like to configure the PC with RAID, since one of the things I'd
    > > like to use this box for is a household NAS -- for storing photos and
    > > music.

    >
    > > If I have a couple of brand new W.D. 160G SATA drives, and I buy this
    > > el-cheapo SATA controller:

    >
    > >http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16815104219

    >
    > > do you think I'll be able to successfully install the OS and get RAID
    > > 1 configured? Some of the write-in reviews on this controller card
    > > said that folks were able to get it working easily under SUSE...so I
    > > was encouraged by that.

    >
    > that addin device uses a SiI 3512 chip for fakeraid. If you plan to dual
    > boot with Windows your plans may differ than going SuSE only.
    >
    > If this is your first time installing Linux/OpenSuSE then you might miss
    > alot of the decision points needed to get up and running. In order to
    > simplify installing the OS consider configuring the fakeraid _after_
    > OpenSuSE is installed on another drive. Booting from a fakeraid array can
    > be very complicated, but using it as a slave is comparatively easy.
    > Let me repeat, its much easier booting the OS from a non-raid drive.
    >
    > If you are determined to boot from the OS installed on fakeraid, then I
    > suggest getting familiar with the CLI on a Live distro that includes
    > the dmraid tools. Do this before your install.
    >
    > Your fakeraid will showup in
    > #dmraid -s
    >
    > as sii_xxyyxxxyy
    > also do
    > #ls -l /dev/mapper/ or
    > #fdisk -l /dev/mapper/sii_xxxyy (fill in the exact device name)
    >
    > your card should have a raid bios where you will setup your array. If you
    > don't setup it up there first then dmraid tools will see nothing.
    >
    > Don't be alarmed at the term fakeraid. It's a Linux thing.
    >
    > --
    > Mark


    Thanks for all the responses/help. I did go ahead and configure the
    box using two 200G W.D. SATA drives, and the cheap $18 RAID controller
    card from Newegg. This was a fresh install of openSUSE 10.2. No need
    or desire to dual-boot with any other OS. I was happy to see that
    openSUSE did indeed recognize the chipset on the cheap controller
    card.

    During install, I was asked to select the drive configuration. I went
    with the option that said RAID via BIOS (or something to that
    effect). I'm assuming that it meant to allow the RAID PCI card to
    abstract the drives for the operating system (i.e. the OS will see the
    device as a single drive, but under the covers the RAID controller is
    handling the RAID 1 mechanics).

    Everything is up and seems to be running fine. I plan on yanking a
    cable from one of the drives, to simulate a drive failure -- just to
    see what happens. After all, part of the reason I am using RAID 1 is
    to have a backup of my data...might as well test it to see if it is
    working, right?

    -Randy


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