CPU temp - Suse

This is a discussion on CPU temp - Suse ; So all you fine and knowledgeable folks do tell. Is there a Gnome or KDE widget, or any doo dad that I can use in an X session that displays the CPU temp? Presuming that your bios can measure it, ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 35

Thread: CPU temp

  1. CPU temp

    So all you fine and knowledgeable folks do tell. Is there a Gnome or KDE
    widget, or any doo dad that I can use in an X session that displays the
    CPU temp? Presuming that your bios can measure it, which mine does, but
    so far I can only actually view it from the BIOS settings screen or a
    quick peek when the info scrolls by on boot/POST. I say widget since I
    would like to drop it into the tray where all the other toys go. (Using
    Gnome at least.) Using 10.2 with the 64 bit kernel and 32 bit base
    system available.

  2. Re: CPU temp

    Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:

    > So all you fine and knowledgeable folks do tell. Is there a Gnome or KDE
    > widget, or any doo dad that I can use in an X session that displays the
    > CPU temp? Presuming that your bios can measure it, which mine does, but
    > so far I can only actually view it from the BIOS settings screen or a
    > quick peek when the info scrolls by on boot/POST. I say widget since I
    > would like to drop it into the tray where all the other toys go. (Using
    > Gnome at least.) Using 10.2 with the 64 bit kernel and 32 bit base
    > system available.


    For KDE try this:

    http://kima.sourceforge.net/

  3. Re: CPU temp

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 00:35:45 -0400, Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:

    > So all you fine and knowledgeable folks do tell. Is there a Gnome or KDE
    > widget, or any doo dad that I can use in an X session that displays the
    > CPU temp? Presuming that your bios can measure it, which mine does, but so


    man sensors
    man sensors-detect
    man gkrellm

    To get started run sensors-detect first.

    --
    Linux Help: http://rsgibson.com/linux.htm
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  4. Re: CPU temp

    Ron Gibson wrote:
    > On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 00:35:45 -0400, Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:
    >
    >> So all you fine and knowledgeable folks do tell. Is there a Gnome or KDE
    >> widget, or any doo dad that I can use in an X session that displays the
    >> CPU temp? Presuming that your bios can measure it, which mine does, but so

    >
    > man sensors
    > man sensors-detect
    > man gkrellm
    >
    > To get started run sensors-detect first.
    >



    Thanks all! And seems like I've seen some of that somewhere! Doh!

  5. Re: CPU temp

    Barnacle Bill the Sailor writes:

    >So all you fine and knowledgeable folks do tell. Is there a Gnome or KDE
    >widget, or any doo dad that I can use in an X session that displays the
    >CPU temp? Presuming that your bios can measure it, which mine does, but
    >so far I can only actually view it from the BIOS settings screen or a
    >quick peek when the info scrolls by on boot/POST. I say widget since I
    >would like to drop it into the tray where all the other toys go. (Using
    >Gnome at least.) Using 10.2 with the 64 bit kernel and 32 bit base
    >system available.


    gkrellm


  6. Re: CPU temp

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 13:38:43 -0400, Unruh
    wrote:

    > Barnacle Bill the Sailor writes:
    >
    >> So all you fine and knowledgeable folks do tell. Is there a Gnome or KDE
    >> widget, or any doo dad that I can use in an X session that displays the
    >> CPU temp? Presuming that your bios can measure it, which mine does, but
    >> so far I can only actually view it from the BIOS settings screen or a
    >> quick peek when the info scrolls by on boot/POST. I say widget since I
    >> would like to drop it into the tray where all the other toys go. (Using
    >> Gnome at least.) Using 10.2 with the 64 bit kernel and 32 bit base
    >> system available.

    >
    > gkrellm
    >


    there's a bunch of gdesklets and super karambas also kima is a kde tray
    applet and if you search gnomefiles.com you'll find a Gnome applet
    probably. You'll also need to set up you sensors using lm_sensors found in
    the sensors rpm
    --
    OpenSuse 10.2 x64, KDE 3.5, Opera 9.x weekly.

  7. Re: CPU temp

    Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:
    > So all you fine and knowledgeable folks do tell. Is there a Gnome or KDE
    > widget, or any doo dad that I can use in an X session that displays the
    > CPU temp? Presuming that your bios can measure it, which mine does, but
    > so far I can only actually view it from the BIOS settings screen or a
    > quick peek when the info scrolls by on boot/POST. I say widget since I
    > would like to drop it into the tray where all the other toys go. (Using
    > Gnome at least.) Using 10.2 with the 64 bit kernel and 32 bit base
    > system available.

    The CPU temperature is measured by a sensor and should be passed to
    ACPI. If it is, and it's passed correctly, you can get it easily from
    any program that reads ACPI data - I use acpiw, which also displays fan
    status, trip points, etc.

    But if the temperature is /not/ passed to ACPI correctly (as was the
    case on this machine) then you need all this sensors stuff. In that case
    you also need to learn about the DSDT.

    The fact that the BIOS reads the correct temperature does not mean that
    ACPI gets it.

    Dave
    --
    (Remove any numerics from my email address.)

  8. Re: CPU temp

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 11:53:09 -0400, Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:

    >> man sensors
    >> man sensors-detect
    >> man gkrellm


    >> To get started run sensors-detect first.


    > Thanks all! And seems like I've seen some of that somewhere! Doh!


    I strongly recommend gkrellm and sensors (actually the authors call it
    lm_sensors). Suse simply calls the package sensors.

    Set up is surprisingly easy unless you have a really new mobo with a
    brand new model sensor chip. It even detects my GPU temperature in my
    Nvidia video card. When you run sensors-detect be sure to save that info
    to a file for later reference. Important items are port number used and
    modules loaded (IOW, which make sensor chip).

    Fine tuning is a little harder, but not impossible. I'm gonna give you
    hints that will take a lot of time off the set up.

    I'd recommend you switch to runlevel 3 to fine tune. After you have the
    app loaded when you boot up and login immediately run...

    sensors (for using C) and sensors -F (for using F).

    Start with the CPU temperature. Remember that value. reboot and go into
    BIOS and check what BIOS says you're CPU temperature is.

    Note that...

    (BIOS Temperature - Sensors Temperature) does not equal zero. If that
    value is zero, IOW they are the same, then you're sensor values are
    calibrated to the BIOS values. Most likely they won't be.

    Open the file /etc/sensors.conf - read the top section. It will give a
    lot more details. but for now lets stick to this easy example.

    In my case the main sensor is
    --------------------------------------

    chip "smsc47m192-*"

    # Temperature and voltage input from SMSC LPC47M192 and LPC47M997 chips
    # This example works on a Gigabyte K8U motherboard
    # Voltages are scaled internally, no computations needed

    -------------------------------------

    And lm_sensors reports the CPU temperature 8C too high. So further down
    in the sensors.conf file in the section above this is added...

    ----------------------------------------

    compute temp2 @-8,@+8 # This is the syntax for changing the offset.
    label temp2 "CPU Temp"
    # set temp2_min 0
    # set temp2_max 60

    ----------------------------------------

    And so on. It might take a bit of guesswork determining which
    temperature is what but use your BIOS as a guide.

    Now after you are satisfied with that start X and open gkrellm. Muck
    around and you'll eventually find the section to display temperatures
    and voltages. Gkrellm also has the ability to be calibrated but it's a
    lot easier. It's too hard to explain - Get the app installed and you'll
    see. You'll need your port number from the file I told you to save.

    Now open a konsole on another desktop and run sensors

    Compare that to what gkrellm reports.

    Adjust. Repeat this process until you are satisfied.

    I have mine so exact the reading are almost identical.

    Why the hell all go to all this trouble anyway ! ? !

    My machine is in a fairly dusty environment. I had one mobo fail and it
    appears that overheating may have played a role in conjunction that it
    was a POS board also.

    I put the good mobo in and don't want to fry it. I usually run around
    109F and it goes as high as 170F when I play UT2004 or do some
    compiling. Well last evening I noticed it was running up around 116F when
    idling. I shut it down and pulled the heat sink and sure enough - It
    had way to much dust buildup (as in dust bunnies). I broke put the
    compressed air and cleaned all the fans and blew out the heat sink.

    This dropped the temperature all the way down to 107F what is reported
    right now as I type.

    --
    Linux Help: http://rsgibson.com/linux.htm
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  9. Re: CPU temp

    Ron Gibson wrote:
    > On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 11:53:09 -0400, Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:
    >
    >>> man sensors
    >>> man sensors-detect
    >>> man gkrellm

    >
    >>> To get started run sensors-detect first.

    >
    >> Thanks all! And seems like I've seen some of that somewhere! Doh!

    >
    > I strongly recommend gkrellm and sensors (actually the authors call it
    > lm_sensors). Suse simply calls the package sensors.
    >
    > Set up is surprisingly easy unless you have a really new mobo with a
    > brand new model sensor chip. It even detects my GPU temperature in my
    > Nvidia video card. When you run sensors-detect be sure to save that info
    > to a file for later reference. Important items are port number used and
    > modules loaded (IOW, which make sensor chip).
    >
    > Fine tuning is a little harder, but not impossible. I'm gonna give you
    > hints that will take a lot of time off the set up.
    >
    > I'd recommend you switch to runlevel 3 to fine tune. After you have the
    > app loaded when you boot up and login immediately run...
    >
    > sensors (for using C) and sensors -F (for using F).
    >
    > Start with the CPU temperature. Remember that value. reboot and go into
    > BIOS and check what BIOS says you're CPU temperature is.
    >
    > Note that...
    >
    > (BIOS Temperature - Sensors Temperature) does not equal zero. If that
    > value is zero, IOW they are the same, then you're sensor values are
    > calibrated to the BIOS values. Most likely they won't be.
    >
    > Open the file /etc/sensors.conf - read the top section. It will give a
    > lot more details. but for now lets stick to this easy example.
    >
    > In my case the main sensor is
    > --------------------------------------
    >
    > chip "smsc47m192-*"
    >
    > # Temperature and voltage input from SMSC LPC47M192 and LPC47M997 chips
    > # This example works on a Gigabyte K8U motherboard
    > # Voltages are scaled internally, no computations needed
    >
    > -------------------------------------
    >
    > And lm_sensors reports the CPU temperature 8C too high. So further down
    > in the sensors.conf file in the section above this is added...
    >
    > ----------------------------------------
    >
    > compute temp2 @-8,@+8 # This is the syntax for changing the offset.
    > label temp2 "CPU Temp"
    > # set temp2_min 0
    > # set temp2_max 60
    >
    > ----------------------------------------
    >
    > And so on. It might take a bit of guesswork determining which
    > temperature is what but use your BIOS as a guide.
    >
    > Now after you are satisfied with that start X and open gkrellm. Muck
    > around and you'll eventually find the section to display temperatures
    > and voltages. Gkrellm also has the ability to be calibrated but it's a
    > lot easier. It's too hard to explain - Get the app installed and you'll
    > see. You'll need your port number from the file I told you to save.
    >
    > Now open a konsole on another desktop and run sensors
    >
    > Compare that to what gkrellm reports.
    >
    > Adjust. Repeat this process until you are satisfied.
    >
    > I have mine so exact the reading are almost identical.
    >
    > Why the hell all go to all this trouble anyway ! ? !
    >
    > My machine is in a fairly dusty environment. I had one mobo fail and it
    > appears that overheating may have played a role in conjunction that it
    > was a POS board also.
    >
    > I put the good mobo in and don't want to fry it. I usually run around
    > 109F and it goes as high as 170F when I play UT2004 or do some
    > compiling. Well last evening I noticed it was running up around 116F when
    > idling. I shut it down and pulled the heat sink and sure enough - It
    > had way to much dust buildup (as in dust bunnies). I broke put the
    > compressed air and cleaned all the fans and blew out the heat sink.
    >
    > This dropped the temperature all the way down to 107F what is reported
    > right now as I type.
    >

    OK everyone. I got so far as getting the sensors up, and Kima runs as a
    KDE kicker. And guess what? You can run a kicker panel in Gnome! Gnome's
    own panel won't kick a kicker, it only launches launchables. That said,
    Kima is reading pretty close to bios, so I figure the underlying sensors
    are OK. Going to try gkrellm next, and has anyone tried anything that
    Gnome will accept in it's panel? EVeryone so very helpful so far. Thanks!

  10. Re: CPU temp

    Ron Gibson wrote:
    > On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 11:53:09 -0400, Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:
    >
    >>> man sensors
    >>> man sensors-detect
    >>> man gkrellm

    >
    >>> To get started run sensors-detect first.

    >
    >> Thanks all! And seems like I've seen some of that somewhere! Doh!

    >
    > I strongly recommend gkrellm and sensors (actually the authors call it
    > lm_sensors). Suse simply calls the package sensors.
    >
    > Set up is surprisingly easy unless you have a really new mobo with a
    > brand new model sensor chip. It even detects my GPU temperature in my
    > Nvidia video card. When you run sensors-detect be sure to save that info
    > to a file for later reference. Important items are port number used and
    > modules loaded (IOW, which make sensor chip).
    >
    > Fine tuning is a little harder, but not impossible. I'm gonna give you
    > hints that will take a lot of time off the set up.
    >
    > I'd recommend you switch to runlevel 3 to fine tune. After you have the
    > app loaded when you boot up and login immediately run...
    >
    > sensors (for using C) and sensors -F (for using F).
    >
    > Start with the CPU temperature. Remember that value. reboot and go into
    > BIOS and check what BIOS says you're CPU temperature is.
    >
    > Note that...
    >
    > (BIOS Temperature - Sensors Temperature) does not equal zero. If that
    > value is zero, IOW they are the same, then you're sensor values are
    > calibrated to the BIOS values. Most likely they won't be.
    >
    > Open the file /etc/sensors.conf - read the top section. It will give a
    > lot more details. but for now lets stick to this easy example.
    >
    > In my case the main sensor is
    > --------------------------------------
    >
    > chip "smsc47m192-*"
    >
    > # Temperature and voltage input from SMSC LPC47M192 and LPC47M997 chips
    > # This example works on a Gigabyte K8U motherboard
    > # Voltages are scaled internally, no computations needed
    >
    > -------------------------------------
    >
    > And lm_sensors reports the CPU temperature 8C too high. So further down
    > in the sensors.conf file in the section above this is added...
    >
    > ----------------------------------------
    >
    > compute temp2 @-8,@+8 # This is the syntax for changing the offset.
    > label temp2 "CPU Temp"
    > # set temp2_min 0
    > # set temp2_max 60
    >
    > ----------------------------------------
    >
    > And so on. It might take a bit of guesswork determining which
    > temperature is what but use your BIOS as a guide.
    >
    > Now after you are satisfied with that start X and open gkrellm. Muck
    > around and you'll eventually find the section to display temperatures
    > and voltages. Gkrellm also has the ability to be calibrated but it's a
    > lot easier. It's too hard to explain - Get the app installed and you'll
    > see. You'll need your port number from the file I told you to save.
    >
    > Now open a konsole on another desktop and run sensors
    >
    > Compare that to what gkrellm reports.
    >
    > Adjust. Repeat this process until you are satisfied.
    >
    > I have mine so exact the reading are almost identical.
    >
    > Why the hell all go to all this trouble anyway ! ? !
    >
    > My machine is in a fairly dusty environment. I had one mobo fail and it
    > appears that overheating may have played a role in conjunction that it
    > was a POS board also.
    >
    > I put the good mobo in and don't want to fry it. I usually run around
    > 109F and it goes as high as 170F when I play UT2004 or do some
    > compiling. Well last evening I noticed it was running up around 116F when
    > idling. I shut it down and pulled the heat sink and sure enough - It
    > had way to much dust buildup (as in dust bunnies). I broke put the
    > compressed air and cleaned all the fans and blew out the heat sink.
    >
    > This dropped the temperature all the way down to 107F what is reported
    > right now as I type.
    >

    OK gkrellm it is....tells me way more than I need to know and is tidy.
    Should be able to launch as a startup item too. Core temp now 99
    degrees. (Six fans in my box and one of them is on the CPU and two
    blowing a hurricane on the GPU.)

  11. Re: CPU temp

    Barnacle Bill the Sailor writes:
    >OK gkrellm it is....tells me way more than I need to know and is tidy.
    >Should be able to launch as a startup item too. Core temp now 99


    I do hope that is in degrees F, not C. If it is C then you are in real
    trouble.

    >degrees. (Six fans in my box and one of them is on the CPU and two
    >blowing a hurricane on the GPU.)


  12. Re: CPU temp

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 20:27:08 -0400, Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:

    >> This dropped the temperature all the way down to 107F what is reported
    >> right now as I type.


    > OK gkrellm it is....tells me way more than I need to know and is tidy.
    > Should be able to launch as a startup item too. Core temp now 99 degrees.
    > (Six fans in my box and one of them is on the CPU and two blowing a
    > hurricane on the GPU.)


    Good. I'm sure you'll find it a priceless little utility and will
    continue using it for a long while.

    In kde I dedicate one desktop to system monitoring. Here that is...

    http://www.rsgibson.com/desktop.htm

    (The other window there is from...

    konsole -e top

    Easy way to set it up so that it always on the same desktop as a
    "startup" item is to follow this sequence (you may already be setup like
    this)...

    kcontrol > KDE Components > Session Manager > On Login

    Make sure "Restore Previous Session" is checked.

    Now setup the application like you want it - Size, position, desktop,
    etc.

    Now, logout. Don't shutdown or reboot but logout and drop to a terminal.
    If you reboot out of KDE it won't save the settings. You must logout to
    a terminal. You might have to change to runlevel three as sometimes
    those managers like KDM, GDM, etc make it hard to drop to a terminal
    (tty).

    Now everytime you log back on gkrellm will open on that desktop exactly
    as you left it.

    I'm sure you'll like this stuff. Mine is more accurate and flexible than
    Gigabytes monitor that run's under windows only.

    There are some other considerations, advanced in nature, having to do
    with calibration like whether the sensor output is linear, but you can
    safely assume it is for your purposes.


    --
    Linux Help: http://rsgibson.com/linux.htm
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  13. Re: CPU temp

    Unruh wrote:

    >>OK gkrellm it is....tells me way more than I need to know and is tidy.
    >>Should be able to launch as a startup item too. Core temp now 99

    >
    >
    > I do hope that is in degrees F, not C. If it is C then you are in real
    > trouble.


    Why that? Old TTL worked fine up to 200 C, where the plastic case
    started melting. Did you never burn your fingers, on chips in a PC?

    DoDi


  14. Re: CPU temp

    Unruh wrote:
    > Barnacle Bill the Sailor writes:
    >> OK gkrellm it is....tells me way more than I need to know and is tidy.
    >> Should be able to launch as a startup item too. Core temp now 99

    >
    > I do hope that is in degrees F, not C. If it is C then you are in real
    > trouble.
    >
    >> degrees. (Six fans in my box and one of them is on the CPU and two
    >> blowing a hurricane on the GPU.)

    Yah, fahrenheit....I can do millimters and kilograms and what not but I
    just can't make the leap to Celsius.

  15. Re: CPU temp

    Hans-Peter Diettrich writes:

    >Unruh wrote:


    >>>OK gkrellm it is....tells me way more than I need to know and is tidy.
    >>>Should be able to launch as a startup item too. Core temp now 99

    >>=20
    >>=20
    >> I do hope that is in degrees F, not C. If it is C then you are in real
    >> trouble.


    >Why that? Old TTL worked fine up to 200 =B0C, where the plastic case=20
    >started melting. Did you never burn your fingers, on chips in a PC?


    No it does not. At that temp the PCB starts to delaminate and all kinds of
    horrible things start to happen. Do NOT run your CPU at 200C or even 100C.

    (And you can burn your fingers on a lot less than 200C. )


    >DoDi



  16. Re: CPU temp

    On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 16:40:27 +0000, Unruh wrote:

    > No it does not. At that temp the PCB starts to delaminate and all kinds
    > of horrible things start to happen. Do NOT run your CPU at 200C or
    > even 100C.


    IIRC the suggested max temp for a P4 was about 200F or 93C. I'm sure
    that's a peak temperature and a rough rule of thumb. Under the heaviest
    of loads mine maxes out at about 168F.

    That's a big swing when you consider idle temperature is about 108F for
    me.

    --
    Linux Help: http://rsgibson.com/linux.htm
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


  17. Re: CPU temp

    Ron Gibson wrote:
    > On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 16:40:27 +0000, Unruh wrote:
    >
    >> No it does not. At that temp the PCB starts to delaminate and all kinds
    >> of horrible things start to happen. Do NOT run your CPU at 200C or
    >> even 100C.

    >
    > IIRC the suggested max temp for a P4 was about 200F or 93C. I'm sure
    > that's a peak temperature and a rough rule of thumb. Under the heaviest
    > of loads mine maxes out at about 168F.
    >
    > That's a big swing when you consider idle temperature is about 108F for
    > me.
    >

    I see mine idles steady about 98F. I have the bios set for load
    throttling, which slows the clock during idle times, and then cranks it
    back up when needed. (and a launcher applet tells me where I am at too,
    very handy!) At peak speed today while compiling some new stuff I saw
    the temp go to 118F, well it peaked there and in fact bobbed up and down
    as the load varied. Glad I got these sensors set up, for it's
    interesting to see what happens when.

  18. Re: CPU temp

    Unruh wrote:

    >>Why that? Old TTL worked fine up to 200 =B0C, where the plastic case=20
    >>started melting. Did you never burn your fingers, on chips in a PC?

    >
    >
    > No it does not. At that temp the PCB starts to delaminate and all kinds of
    > horrible things start to happen. Do NOT run your CPU at 200C or even 100C.


    Don't confuse chip and ambient (PCB...) temparature, the former can be
    (usually is) significantly higher. Depending on the technology, a
    temporary malfunction can/will occur long before a chip is permanently
    damaged. Modern CPU's also stop operation, by design, when a certain
    temperature is reached. I had such an failure twice, until the service
    noticed the broken socket, which didn't always keep the cooler in tight
    contact with the case.

    We also happened to operate (portable) computers at ambient temparatures
    above 70C, for hours, with no noticeable problems - neither then nor
    later. They perfectly logged the temparature and other data during that
    time, and only the display became unreadable while it was too hot.

    Of course every rise in chip temparature decreases the lifetime, so it's
    always good to keep the temparature as low as possible.


    > (And you can burn your fingers on a lot less than 200C. )


    Right, but steam from a wet finger indicates > 100C ;-)

    DoDi

  19. Re: CPU temp

    Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:

    > Yah, fahrenheit....I can do millimters and kilograms and what not but I
    > just can't make the leap to Celsius.


    I can understand that difficulty. I noticed the same problem here, when
    in an action movie ambient temparatures above 100 degrees were reported
    - because the translator had forgotten to adjust the figures to Celsius.

    DoDi

  20. Re: CPU temp

    On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 22:38:16 -0400, Barnacle Bill the Sailor wrote:

    >> That's a big swing when you consider idle temperature is about 108F
    >> for me.


    > I see mine idles steady about 98F. I have the bios set for load
    > throttling, which slows the clock during idle times, and then cranks it
    > back up when needed. (and a launcher applet tells me where I am at too,
    > very handy!) At peak speed today while compiling some new stuff I saw the
    > temp go to 118F, well it peaked there and in fact bobbed up and down as
    > the load varied. Glad I got these sensors set up, for it's interesting to
    > see what happens when.


    Oh Gkrellm with sensors is a killer app. The CPU is conjunction with
    processes, memory and what top says can help you quickly spot problem
    apps, ones hogging the CPU or with a memory leak.

    I like the ETH0 bandwidth monitor as I can set it up to be downloading a
    torrent with Azureus so as to give the download 150KB/s and still have
    enough left over to play UT2004. I have a 3MB connection so I have
    enough to bandwidth to do that with needing a more expensive 10 or 15MB
    connection.

    IMO, this is really a good thing to have the info to tweak stuff so you
    get the maximum out of your machine.

    Here's a wild thought I had. I'm an engineer which means I have
    terminal OCD The way that /etc/sensors.conf is set up you could
    take exact direct readings with a thermometer and a voltage meter and
    REALLY fine tune it all, LOL!

    I try to make a point of informing people about this stuff as
    surprisingly enough a lot of people aren't aware of these capabilities.

    Enjoy...

    --
    Linux Help: http://rsgibson.com/linux.htm
    Email - rsgibson@verizon.borg
    Replace borg with net


+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast