Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10 - SUN

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Thread: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

  1. Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    I've been away from this newsgroup for longer than I'd care
    to admit. I've been using Sun systems since shortly after
    I held the first one in my hands at HP's Computer Colloquium
    lecture series March 4, 1982. For the curious, the origin of
    the name "SUN" is Stanford University Network. A scan I just
    did of the original announcement can be seen here:

    [600KB]

    I also hate to admit what I've paid for Sun systems over the
    years from Sun-3/60 to IPX to SPARCstation 10, SPARCstation 20,
    etc., so I was curious how inexpensively I could get back in
    the game to get up to speed with Solaris 10.

    Would you believe under US$300? It's true! :-)

    Beginning with a $217 "open box special" Compaq SR5501P from
    a local Office Depot, a $40 4GB DDR2-PC6400 RAM upgrade, and
    a "spare" 300GB Maxtor hard drive, I did it. Not only does
    it run Solaris 10, it triple-boots into Fedora 9 and Windows
    Vista SP1 as well. This is an AMD Athlon x2 64-bit system.

    The Solaris and system information can be viewed here:



    There were only 3 problems with Solaris 10, all solvable:

    1. Running both the Sun install-check v.1.4 and the Sun
    Device Detection Tool on Office Depot's display model
    revealed I needed the nfo Ethernet driver available at:



    It's free, and it works.

    2. System Registration was a nightmare; the Sun GUI was a
    typical POS and constantly failed. The folks at Sun's
    Solaris_Installation_Support(at)sun.com hadn't a clue
    and only provided wrong information. After poking around
    the system, I "discovered" that bringing up a root shell
    and running updatemanager and clicking on its "Register
    System" would work, and thus I could get patches. Or so
    I thought.

    3. updatemanager itself is another POS. It would download
    the *.jar patch updates but it wouldn't install them. A
    Google search revealed that PCA, which is available at
    , is the only
    way to get patches installed properly under Solaris 10
    (or *any* other version of Solaris and SunOS).

    So, now the system works great, just installed Sun Studio 12
    and all the Solaris freeware stuff, and I'm a happy camper.

    Can anyone beat that US$300 for a 64-bit Solaris 10 system?

    :-)

  2. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    Thad.Floryan@gmail.com wrote:
    > I've been away from this newsgroup for longer than I'd care
    > to admit. I've been using Sun systems since shortly after
    > I held the first one in my hands at HP's Computer Colloquium
    > lecture series March 4, 1982. For the curious, the origin of
    > the name "SUN" is Stanford University Network. A scan I just
    > did of the original announcement can be seen here:
    >
    > [600KB]
    >
    > I also hate to admit what I've paid for Sun systems over the
    > years from Sun-3/60 to IPX to SPARCstation 10, SPARCstation 20,
    > etc., so I was curious how inexpensively I could get back in
    > the game to get up to speed with Solaris 10.
    >
    > Would you believe under US$300? It's true! :-)
    >
    > Beginning with a $217 "open box special" Compaq SR5501P from
    > a local Office Depot, a $40 4GB DDR2-PC6400 RAM upgrade, and
    > a "spare" 300GB Maxtor hard drive, I did it. Not only does
    > it run Solaris 10, it triple-boots into Fedora 9 and Windows
    > Vista SP1 as well. This is an AMD Athlon x2 64-bit system.
    >
    > The Solaris and system information can be viewed here:
    >
    >
    >
    > There were only 3 problems with Solaris 10, all solvable:
    >
    > 1. Running both the Sun install-check v.1.4 and the Sun
    > Device Detection Tool on Office Depot's display model
    > revealed I needed the nfo Ethernet driver available at:
    >
    >
    >
    > It's free, and it works.
    >
    > 2. System Registration was a nightmare; the Sun GUI was a
    > typical POS and constantly failed. The folks at Sun's
    > Solaris_Installation_Support(at)sun.com hadn't a clue
    > and only provided wrong information. After poking around
    > the system, I "discovered" that bringing up a root shell
    > and running updatemanager and clicking on its "Register
    > System" would work, and thus I could get patches. Or so
    > I thought.
    >
    > 3. updatemanager itself is another POS. It would download
    > the *.jar patch updates but it wouldn't install them. A
    > Google search revealed that PCA, which is available at
    > , is the only
    > way to get patches installed properly under Solaris 10
    > (or *any* other version of Solaris and SunOS).
    >
    > So, now the system works great, just installed Sun Studio 12
    > and all the Solaris freeware stuff, and I'm a happy camper.
    >
    > Can anyone beat that US$300 for a 64-bit Solaris 10 system?
    >
    > :-)


    Easily! Sun Ultra 10 workstatation < $100. 40 GB IDE disk salvaged
    from a PC someone threw away. CRT monitor salvaged from curbside. I've
    had about three years of use from it so far. I have three Ultra 10s and
    an Ultra 5 that make up my home lab. I can do what I want with them,
    when I want to. No approvals required from security or change control.
    Since I AM the management, management approval is easy to obtain. :-)

    One of these days I might look at upgrading to slightly more modern
    hardware but only when it's really cheap!


    Most of the hardware at curbside these days is 8-10 years old but,
    assuming the box has enough RAM, you can install Solaris on an old PC
    for nothing.

  3. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    On Fri, 8 Aug 2008 08:50:01 -0700 (PDT), "Thad.Floryan@gmail.com" wrote:

    >Can anyone beat that US$300 for a 64-bit Solaris 10 system?


    Easy. How about $20 for a Sun Netra T100 with 64 bit Sparc and 256
    meg RAM? Runs Solaris 10 very nicely with 2 x 9 gig SCSI HD.
    Also runs SRSS and Windows connector.

    You got done.

    Barry
    =====
    Home page
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og

  4. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    On 2008-08-09, Barry OGrady wrote:
    > On Fri, 8 Aug 2008 08:50:01 -0700 (PDT), "Thad.Floryan@gmail.com" wrote:
    >
    >>Can anyone beat that US$300 for a 64-bit Solaris 10 system?

    >
    > Easy. How about $20 for a Sun Netra T100


    $20? I got my T105 for nothing...

    )


    --
    "Be thankful that you have a life, and forsake your vain
    and presumptuous desire for a second one."
    [email me at huge {at} huge (dot) org uk]

  5. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    Sun blade 100 off ebay

    Huge wrote:

    >On 2008-08-09, Barry OGrady wrote:
    >> On Fri, 8 Aug 2008 08:50:01 -0700 (PDT), "Thad.Floryan@gmail.com" wrote:
    >>
    >>>Can anyone beat that US$300 for a 64-bit Solaris 10 system?

    >>
    >> Easy. How about $20 for a Sun Netra T100

    >
    >$20? I got my T105 for nothing...
    >
    >)


  6. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    Thad.Floryan@gmail.com wrote:
    > I've been away from this newsgroup for longer than I'd care
    > to admit. I've been using Sun systems since shortly after
    > I held the first one in my hands at HP's Computer Colloquium
    > lecture series March 4, 1982. For the curious, the origin of
    > the name "SUN" is Stanford University Network. A scan I just
    > did of the original announcement can be seen here:
    >
    > [600KB]
    >
    > I also hate to admit what I've paid for Sun systems over the
    > years from Sun-3/60 to IPX to SPARCstation 10, SPARCstation 20,
    > etc., so I was curious how inexpensively I could get back in
    > the game to get up to speed with Solaris 10.
    >
    > Would you believe under US$300? It's true! :-)
    >
    > Beginning with a $217 "open box special" Compaq SR5501P from
    > a local Office Depot, a $40 4GB DDR2-PC6400 RAM upgrade, and
    > a "spare" 300GB Maxtor hard drive, I did it. Not only does
    > it run Solaris 10, it triple-boots into Fedora 9 and Windows
    > Vista SP1 as well. This is an AMD Athlon x2 64-bit system.
    >
    > The Solaris and system information can be viewed here:
    >
    >
    >
    > There were only 3 problems with Solaris 10, all solvable:
    >
    > 1. Running both the Sun install-check v.1.4 and the Sun
    > Device Detection Tool on Office Depot's display model
    > revealed I needed the nfo Ethernet driver available at:
    >
    >
    >
    > It's free, and it works.
    >
    > 2. System Registration was a nightmare; the Sun GUI was a
    > typical POS and constantly failed. The folks at Sun's
    > Solaris_Installation_Support(at)sun.com hadn't a clue
    > and only provided wrong information. After poking around
    > the system, I "discovered" that bringing up a root shell
    > and running updatemanager and clicking on its "Register
    > System" would work, and thus I could get patches. Or so
    > I thought.
    >
    > 3. updatemanager itself is another POS. It would download
    > the *.jar patch updates but it wouldn't install them. A
    > Google search revealed that PCA, which is available at
    > , is the only
    > way to get patches installed properly under Solaris 10
    > (or *any* other version of Solaris and SunOS).
    >
    > So, now the system works great, just installed Sun Studio 12
    > and all the Solaris freeware stuff, and I'm a happy camper.
    >
    > Can anyone beat that US$300 for a 64-bit Solaris 10 system?


    VirtualBox is totally free...



    --
    /"\ Join the ASCII | Thommy M. Malmström
    \ / ribbon campaign | AB Hardeberga IT
    X against HTML mail | Skiffervägen 23, 224 78 Lund
    / \ and postings | +46 70 969 57 93
    ================================================== =====================
    http://www.at-hardeberga.com thommym (at) at-hardeberga.com
    ================================================== =====================
    "The box said 'Windows 2000 Server or better', so I installed Solaris."
    ================================================== =====================

  7. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 19:54:16 GMT, "Thommy M. Malmström" wrote:

    >Thad.Floryan@gmail.com wrote:
    >> I've been away from this newsgroup for longer than I'd care
    >> to admit. I've been using Sun systems since shortly after
    >> I held the first one in my hands at HP's Computer Colloquium
    >> lecture series March 4, 1982. For the curious, the origin of
    >> the name "SUN" is Stanford University Network. A scan I just
    >> did of the original announcement can be seen here:
    >>
    >> [600KB]
    >>
    >> I also hate to admit what I've paid for Sun systems over the
    >> years from Sun-3/60 to IPX to SPARCstation 10, SPARCstation 20,
    >> etc., so I was curious how inexpensively I could get back in
    >> the game to get up to speed with Solaris 10.
    >>
    >> Would you believe under US$300? It's true! :-)
    >>
    >> Beginning with a $217 "open box special" Compaq SR5501P from
    >> a local Office Depot, a $40 4GB DDR2-PC6400 RAM upgrade, and
    >> a "spare" 300GB Maxtor hard drive, I did it. Not only does
    >> it run Solaris 10, it triple-boots into Fedora 9 and Windows
    >> Vista SP1 as well. This is an AMD Athlon x2 64-bit system.
    >>
    >> The Solaris and system information can be viewed here:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> There were only 3 problems with Solaris 10, all solvable:
    >>
    >> 1. Running both the Sun install-check v.1.4 and the Sun
    >> Device Detection Tool on Office Depot's display model
    >> revealed I needed the nfo Ethernet driver available at:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> It's free, and it works.
    >>
    >> 2. System Registration was a nightmare; the Sun GUI was a
    >> typical POS and constantly failed. The folks at Sun's
    >> Solaris_Installation_Support(at)sun.com hadn't a clue
    >> and only provided wrong information. After poking around
    >> the system, I "discovered" that bringing up a root shell
    >> and running updatemanager and clicking on its "Register
    >> System" would work, and thus I could get patches. Or so
    >> I thought.
    >>
    >> 3. updatemanager itself is another POS. It would download
    >> the *.jar patch updates but it wouldn't install them. A
    >> Google search revealed that PCA, which is available at
    >> , is the only
    >> way to get patches installed properly under Solaris 10
    >> (or *any* other version of Solaris and SunOS).
    >>
    >> So, now the system works great, just installed Sun Studio 12
    >> and all the Solaris freeware stuff, and I'm a happy camper.
    >>
    >> Can anyone beat that US$300 for a 64-bit Solaris 10 system?

    >
    >VirtualBox is totally free...


    A Sun Netra 100/105/200 can be had free or cheap and Solaris 10
    installs with no dramas. I also installed Sunray Server and Windows
    Connector with no problems, and it all works.

    Barry
    =====
    Home page
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og

  8. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    On Aug 8, 11:50 am, "Thad.Flor...@gmail.com"
    wrote:
    (...)

    Most interesting, thanks for sharing.

  9. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    On Sat, 23 Aug 2008 08:40:01 -0700 (PDT), SQ wrote:

    >On Aug 8, 11:50 am, "Thad.Flor...@gmail.com"
    >wrote:
    >(...)
    >
    >Most interesting, thanks for sharing.


    You find (...) interesting?

    Barry
    =====
    Home page
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og

  10. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    I don't know about the premise of "Least expensive".
    I am tired of using obsolete equipment like Ultra 10. I suppose it was
    pretty fast for its day some 10 years ago. I have a half a gig of RAM
    in it but the browser is very slow in it. I mainly run X-windows on
    it.

    I just upgraded to Ultra 40 M2 - no regrets. Very fast machine with
    several Gigs of RAM.

    Computer hardware has dropped in price considerably in the last 10
    years. You can get a nice x86 machine with Solaris 10.

    I am not sure if x86 was acceptable to the OP though.

  11. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    On Aug 24, 5:19 pm, SQ wrote:
    > I don't know about the premise of "Least expensive".
    > I am tired of using obsolete equipment like Ultra 10. I suppose it was
    > pretty fast for its day some 10 years ago. I have a half a gig of RAM
    > in it but the browser is very slow in it. I mainly run X-windows on
    > it.
    >
    > I just upgraded to Ultra 40 M2 - no regrets. Very fast machine with
    > several Gigs of RAM.
    >
    > Computer hardware has dropped in price considerably in the last 10
    > years. You can get a nice x86 machine with Solaris 10.
    >
    > I am not sure if x86 was acceptable to the OP though.


    It wasn't that an x86 would not have been acceptable, it was that an
    AMD64 x2 system from Office Depot was so inexpensive compared to my
    prior Sun purchases. Would you believe US$18K for a Sun 3/60? That's
    what they used to cost new, discounted for developers.

    I could start a computer museum with some of the iron I still have
    here: Sun 3/60s, IPXs, SS20s, etc. even 3 functional 3B1 systems.

    For less than US$300 I was able to buy a modern system and get back
    up to speed with Solaris 10 quickly. A lot's the same from 2.5.1 but
    there are plenty of new procedural changes -- svcadm was the first
    that caught my attention -- and I'm still perusing all the info I
    downloaded from docs.sun.com in PDF form. That alone (PDFs) is a
    nice change -- no more the "wall" of manuals (though I still have
    one set for SunOS 4.1.1).

    The only aspect of the system I don't have tuned to my satisfaction
    is printing (to various HP LaserJets). This has always been a hassle
    with SunOS/Solaris (for me) for 15+ years now. I finally downloaded
    the Sun freeware CUPs distribution and still need to "play" with that.

  12. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    Thad.Floryan@gmail.com wrote:
    > On Aug 24, 5:19 pm, SQ wrote:
    >> I don't know about the premise of "Least expensive".
    >> I am tired of using obsolete equipment like Ultra 10. I suppose it was
    >> pretty fast for its day some 10 years ago. I have a half a gig of RAM
    >> in it but the browser is very slow in it. I mainly run X-windows on
    >> it.
    >>
    >> I just upgraded to Ultra 40 M2 - no regrets. Very fast machine with
    >> several Gigs of RAM.
    >>
    >> Computer hardware has dropped in price considerably in the last 10
    >> years. You can get a nice x86 machine with Solaris 10.
    >>
    >> I am not sure if x86 was acceptable to the OP though.

    >
    > It wasn't that an x86 would not have been acceptable, it was that an
    > AMD64 x2 system from Office Depot was so inexpensive compared to my
    > prior Sun purchases. Would you believe US$18K for a Sun 3/60? That's
    > what they used to cost new, discounted for developers.
    >
    > I could start a computer museum with some of the iron I still have
    > here: Sun 3/60s, IPXs, SS20s, etc. even 3 functional 3B1 systems.
    >
    > For less than US$300 I was able to buy a modern system and get back
    > up to speed with Solaris 10 quickly. A lot's the same from 2.5.1 but
    > there are plenty of new procedural changes -- svcadm was the first
    > that caught my attention -- and I'm still perusing all the info I
    > downloaded from docs.sun.com in PDF form. That alone (PDFs) is a
    > nice change -- no more the "wall" of manuals (though I still have
    > one set for SunOS 4.1.1).
    >
    > The only aspect of the system I don't have tuned to my satisfaction
    > is printing (to various HP LaserJets). This has always been a hassle
    > with SunOS/Solaris (for me) for 15+ years now. I finally downloaded
    > the Sun freeware CUPs distribution and still need to "play" with that.


    Up until Solaris 10, you had to sacrifice one small goat or two medium
    chickens to get printing to work.

    With Solaris 10, it's a breeze. You crank up a program called prtadmin
    or something similar. It asks you, Windows fashion, for the
    manufacturer (pick it from list) and then for the model (pick from list)
    and you're done! I nearly had my second heart attack when I
    encountered this for the first time. If the printer is connected via
    the network, you have to enter the IP address.

    For Solaris 9 and earlier versions, you need HP Jetadmin software for
    printers connected via the network and the afore mentioned goat or two
    chickens.


  13. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    On Aug 27, 4:54 am, "Richard B. Gilbert"
    wrote:
    > [...]
    > Up until Solaris 10, you had to sacrifice one small goat or two medium
    > chickens to get printing to work.


    Ain't that the truth! :-)

    > [...]
    > With Solaris 10, it's a breeze. You crank up a program called prtadmin
    > or something similar. It asks you, Windows fashion, for the
    > manufacturer (pick it from list) and then for the model (pick from list)
    > and you're done! I nearly had my second heart attack when I
    > encountered this for the first time. If the printer is connected via
    > the network, you have to enter the IP address.


    Hmmm, that was exactly what I attempted within the first few
    hours after installing the system. I thought to myself "Hey, just like
    Windows and some of the Linux systems!". For the first printer I chose
    my LJ4050n (networked with JetDirect), accepted the offered driver
    (Foo
    something), and entered its IP address. Nada. No test page, nothing. I
    spent over 10 hours with Sun's docs and various tests and still nada,
    so I put this effort on the back burner a few weeks ago.

    The LJ4050n printer is working fine from my Windows boxes, Solaris 2,
    7 and 8, and every Linux box here (9 of them: SLED 10 SP1; Fedora 2,
    3,
    8 and 9; Red Hat 9; Ubuntu 7.10 and 8.04; and PCLinuxOS). I didn't
    even
    try to setup my LJ P2015n given how a ubiquitous LJ4050n doesn't
    print.

    I was "playing" with CUPS earlier today from the Sun FreeWare archive,
    and that's not printing to the LJ4050n, either.

    Setting up printing should NOT be this troublesome, especially when
    everything else (file sharing, etc.) was essentially trivial to setup.

    Google searches on this subject are giving me a bad feeling, like
    what I had with attempting to register the system, contacting Sun
    Support, and having to find the solution on my own (along with finding
    PCA for getting/applying patches) as I wrote in the opening post in
    this thread.

    I'm at the current patch level for Solaris 10u5, so I'll back-out
    CUPS,
    drink some more coffee while reading Sun's LP admin docs, and make
    another attempt later with the "stock" printing suite.

    > For Solaris 9 and earlier versions, you need HP Jetadmin software for
    > printers connected via the network and the afore mentioned goat or two
    > chickens.


    Heh, I'm really tempted at this point to either install a newer
    JetAdmin
    package or HP's new suite from SourceForge and be done with it.
    Printing
    is not rocket science, and at my age time is precious. :-)

  14. Re: Least expensive hardware for running Solaris 10

    Thad.Floryan@gmail.com wrote:

    >
    > Hmmm, that was exactly what I attempted within the first few
    > hours after installing the system. I thought to myself "Hey, just like
    > Windows and some of the Linux systems!". For the first printer I chose
    > my LJ4050n (networked with JetDirect), accepted the offered driver
    > (Foo
    > something), and entered its IP address. Nada. No test page, nothing. I
    > spent over 10 hours with Sun's docs and various tests and still nada,
    > so I put this effort on the back burner a few weeks ago.
    >


    try printmgr if it helps. Be sure to enable all services related to
    printing, like ipp
    pike-root% svcs \*prin\*
    STATE STIME FMRI
    disabled Aug_27 svc:/application/print/server:default
    disabled Aug_27 svc:/application/cde-printinfo:default
    disabled Aug_27 svc:/application/print/ipp-listener:default
    online Aug_27 svc:/application/print/ppd-cache-update:default
    offline Aug_27 svc:/application/print/rfc1179:default


    http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/features.../using_ipp.jsp

    hth,

    gerard

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