Solaris Certification - SUN

This is a discussion on Solaris Certification - SUN ; Hello , I am trying to get self study certfication in Administration Solaris 10. But Hardly I can get courses . Can I have some advices about getting pass the exam using self study approach. (internet resources , good books ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: Solaris Certification

  1. Solaris Certification

    Hello ,
    I am trying to get self study certfication in Administration Solaris
    10. But Hardly I can get courses . Can I have some advices about
    getting pass the exam using self study approach.
    (internet resources , good books ......)
    Thanks
    Ehab

  2. Re: Solaris Certification

    happytoday wrote:
    >
    > I am trying to get self study certfication in Administration Solaris
    > 10.


    A standard comment about getting most certifications in
    the IT industry - Doing it equals declaring yourself Junior.
    If you're currently Novice that's good. If you're currently
    Intermediate/Advanced that's bad. Consider that I have
    over the years taken certification in Cisco and EMC to
    show that i'm familiar with these side fields of SysAdmin.
    I didn't mind declaring myself junior in those subfields.

    > But Hardly I can get courses . Can I have some advices about
    > getting pass the exam using self study approach.
    > (internet resources , good books ......)


    I've never had trouble finding Solaris cert books when walking
    through big book stores. Look for Solaris 9 and you'll find
    all sorts of them.

  3. Re: Solaris Certification

    > A standard comment about getting most certifications in
    > the IT industry - Doing it equals declaring yourself Junior.
    > If you're currently Novice that's good. *If you're currently
    > Intermediate/Advanced that's bad. *Consider that I have
    > over the years taken certification in Cisco and EMC to
    > show that i'm familiar with these side fields of SysAdmin.
    > I didn't mind declaring myself junior in those subfields.


    I'm not sure I agree with that assessment. Certification is
    demonstration of a minimum skill level. It's also a requirement for
    many jobs. It does you no good to be an "expert" in your field if an
    HR department won't even schedule an interview with you because you
    lack a basic certification.

  4. Re: Solaris Certification

    In article
    <858fbf49-f466-490c-b4a5-c3be2c058e90@d77g2000hsb.googlegroups.com>,
    ITguy wrote:

    > > A standard comment about getting most certifications in
    > > the IT industry - Doing it equals declaring yourself Junior.
    > > If you're currently Novice that's good. *If you're currently
    > > Intermediate/Advanced that's bad. *Consider that I have
    > > over the years taken certification in Cisco and EMC to
    > > show that i'm familiar with these side fields of SysAdmin.
    > > I didn't mind declaring myself junior in those subfields.

    >
    > I'm not sure I agree with that assessment. Certification is
    > demonstration of a minimum skill level. It's also a requirement for
    > many jobs. It does you no good to be an "expert" in your field if an
    > HR department won't even schedule an interview with you because you
    > lack a basic certification.


    If the HR department is screen Solaris people based on if they've passed
    a certification exam or not, you need to hire without their
    interference. Here in Silcon Valley, a client who works for SUN told me
    that customers were complaining that experienced sysadmins were hard to
    find.

    Most of the "certified Solaris admins" I've talked to _were_ really
    junior having gotten their experience in training rather than in the
    trenches. And they weren't very good at solving problems, a key
    requirement for being a UNIX sysadmin (but probably not so much for a
    Billyware admin).

    --
    DeeDee, don't press that button! DeeDee! NO! Dee...
    [I filter all Goggle Groups posts, so any reply may be automatically by ignored]



  5. Re: Solaris Certification

    In article ,
    Michael Vilain writes:
    > In article
    > <858fbf49-f466-490c-b4a5-c3be2c058e90@d77g2000hsb.googlegroups.com>,
    > ITguy wrote:
    >
    >> > A standard comment about getting most certifications in
    >> > the IT industry - Doing it equals declaring yourself Junior.
    >> > If you're currently Novice that's good. *If you're currently
    >> > Intermediate/Advanced that's bad. *Consider that I have
    >> > over the years taken certification in Cisco and EMC to
    >> > show that i'm familiar with these side fields of SysAdmin.
    >> > I didn't mind declaring myself junior in those subfields.

    >>
    >> I'm not sure I agree with that assessment. Certification is
    >> demonstration of a minimum skill level. It's also a requirement for
    >> many jobs. It does you no good to be an "expert" in your field if an
    >> HR department won't even schedule an interview with you because you
    >> lack a basic certification.

    >
    > If the HR department is screen Solaris people based on if they've passed
    > a certification exam or not, you need to hire without their
    > interference. Here in Silcon Valley, a client who works for SUN told me
    > that customers were complaining that experienced sysadmins were hard to
    > find.
    >
    > Most of the "certified Solaris admins" I've talked to _were_ really
    > junior having gotten their experience in training rather than in the
    > trenches. And they weren't very good at solving problems, a key
    > requirement for being a UNIX sysadmin (but probably not so much for a
    > Billyware admin).
    >


    It really all depends on who you want to impress. Certificates
    impress HR-types and middle-management, but are otherwise
    meaningless. What the mean is that somebody has read "the book"
    and can regurgitate on command but is probably incapable of
    critical thought when it comes time to solve problems.

    But, since HR and middle-management usually have the last word
    in such situations, does it really *hurt* to take the time to
    get that otherwise meaningless piece of paper?

    Bob Melson
    Happily retired sysadmin
    --
    Robert G. Melson | Rio Grande MicroSolutions | El Paso, Texas
    -----
    Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is the probable
    reason so few engage in it. -- Henry Ford


  6. Re: Solaris Certification

    happytoday wrote:
    > Hello ,
    > I am trying to get self study certfication in Administration Solaris
    > 10. But Hardly I can get courses . Can I have some advices about
    > getting pass the exam using self study approach.
    > (internet resources , good books ......)
    > Thanks
    > Ehab


    There is no substitute for experience!

    Buy two or more old Sun machines. Ultra 5 and Ultra 10 workstations can
    be bought on e-Bay for under $100 US. You will need at least two in
    order to configure and use the networking capabilities of the O/S.

    Download Solaris 10, burn CDs and install Solaris.

    Get a book, or two, or three. Try to do all the things the books
    discuss. When you have found all the errors in the books you have, you
    will be ready to sit for the examination!


  7. Re: Solaris Certification


    "happytoday" wrote in message news:ec4b0c54-5b75-4fed-9cf9-b751e6978b2e@e39g2000hsf.googlegroups.com...
    > Hello ,
    > I am trying to get self study certfication in Administration Solaris
    > 10. But Hardly I can get courses . Can I have some advices about
    > getting pass the exam using self study approach.
    > (internet resources , good books ......)


    First, remember that Solaris 10 is significantly different from
    Solaris 9 and earlier versions.

    Bill Calkins' Exam Prep book is often recommended. It assumes
    you know almost nothing about the subject and explains everything.
    It includes a cd with a practice exam.
    There is some sample content online at
    http://www.informit.com/store/produc...sbn=0789734613
    Remember to check the errata at
    http://unixed.com/certification/Sola..._10_errata.htm


    Go to docs.sun.com and look for Solaris 10, system administrator
    collection. Currently it is at
    http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/coll/47.16
    but that could change.

    In particular, look at System Administration Guide: Basic Administration
    and System Administration Guide: Advanced Administration, although
    you may as well download the lot while you are there (remember to
    rename the downloaded files to something meaningful).

    Then practise a lot. Ideally you will have a dedicated machine but
    you can run Solaris inside a vmware virtual machine and I believe
    there is even a live cd version available.

    When you come to take the exam, check the pass mark and work
    out how many answers you can afford to get wrong. This can help
    you feel confident about moving on to the next question rather than
    getting stuck on a hard question. (You can go back at the end.)

    Before you book an exam, check Sun's web site to make sure
    the requirements have not changed (that caught me out once!) and
    do any free practice exams or assessments that are on the site.
    Make sure you buy the exam for the right country!

    --
    John.





  8. Re: Solaris Certification

    Having just completed my SCSA for Solaris10 after having worked as a
    Solaris administrator for the last three years (out of 13 years in IT)
    I can honestly say that unless you enjoy learning by Rote, i'd get
    some experience under your belt before taking the exams.

    Basically, they do pretty much nothing but test your ability to
    regurgitate information, the multiple choice exam should really be
    abolished in favour of lab-based examinations like RedHat or Cisco
    but, it may either:

    a) get your foot in the door
    b) give you an advantage over an equally skilled candidate without one

    At the most basic level, at least it shows initiative and a desire to
    learn.

    I configured a lab for myself on my home PC using what was Innoteks
    Virtualbox software, now owned an re-branded as Sun xVM. Its available
    under GPL, you can download it and install it for free. I got myself a
    copy of Bill Calkins Exam Prep Guide for Solaris 10 (in the process of
    being updated and r-issued) and some exam prep questions from his site
    www.unixed.com. I went through the book, practised all skills required
    until I knew them well, took the mock exams until I was bored, bored,
    bored. I must say that my skills have improived, but only because I
    was touching on stuff that I never had to use in my day to day work
    such as printing and NIS. I suppose it also helps you cement your
    knowledge.

    Again, there is no substitute for real-world experience and peoples
    perception of your skills, image, charm, whatever as opposed to the
    reality of your true self and competences is what may get you ahead.
    People might also flame for this, but If I were you i'd perhaps look
    at the RHCE certification instead. I have the study guide in front of
    me, and it does seem to cover skills that are in more demand in the
    real world such as apache, squid, sendmail, dns, samba. I've also
    found there is more demand for people with Linux skills, and there are
    more opportunities (read jobs) out there for junior administrators.

    Sun really need to get their act together to compete with Linux on
    many levels, certification being one of them.

    HTH

  9. Re: Solaris Certification

    >On Jun 20, 2:24 am, "John L" wrote:
    > First, remember that Solaris 10 is significantly different from
    > Solaris 9 and earlier versions.


    rockie questian,
    in what way are they significantly different ?
    (just the short version ...)

    Rgds,
    Mat

  10. Re: Solaris Certification

    On 2008-06-21 13:36:40 +0100, fanell@kth.se said:

    >> On Jun 20, 2:24 am, "John L" wrote:
    >> First, remember that Solaris 10 is significantly different from
    >> Solaris 9 and earlier versions.

    >
    > rockie questian,
    > in what way are they significantly different ?
    > (just the short version ...)


    There's a good table at
    though for some
    reason they list smpatch as a feature.

    Cheers,

    Chris


  11. Re: Solaris Certification

    On Jun 21, 8:48 am, Chris Ridd wrote:
    > There's a good table at
    > though for some
    > reason they list smpatch as a feature.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Chris


    Thanks Chris,

    rgds Mats

  12. Re: Solaris Certification

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.unix.admin, in article
    <26c10cb5-0af4-4947-bffa-ca829ba80c32@2g2000hsn.googlegroups.com>, Doug
    Freyburger wrote:

    NOTE: Posting from groups.google.com (or some web-forums) dramatically
    reduces the chance of your post being seen. Find a real news server.

    >jpd wrote:


    >Back in 2000 I did the basic Cisco certifications. I've since
    >been-there-done-that with some data center migrations, large
    >WAN audits and so on. So I let the certifications lapse and
    >now let my hands on experiences do the talking.


    >Back in 2005 I got certified in EMC SAN work. Same deal.
    >At the time declaring myself Junior in the field made good
    >sense. I've since been-there-done-that with more data center
    >migrations, migrations of live frame data without taking hosts
    >down, doing BCV stuff, you name it. So I've let that certification
    >lapse as well. Once again I will let my experience do the
    >talking as I'm no loonger Junior in that sub-field either.


    But where were you back then? Did you have other skills/experience
    that an employer would want, or do you feel that the certifications
    (or the training for the certifications) made the difference??

    >> In short (to the OP), if you want to enter the market through HR, get
    >> a couple of boxes, install and reinstall the system and various sets
    >> of services, make up endless excercises, and toy with them until you
    >> have a good feel for setting up such systems.


    Agree - nothing matches having your hands dirty because you're actually
    in there taking it apart, putting it back together - seeing how it all
    works.

    >> Then work through the book, get the cert, wave it around, and see
    >> that you land a job with experienced people to learn from them. And
    >> put in even more effort to *learn*.

    >
    >The better the moentor you find the better your progress.


    Faster and further.

    >Thing is, I'm happy to hire folks who aren't yet experts. Sure, I
    >want to hire more SAGE Senior SysAdmins, who doesn't.


    "want to hire" - you betcha! The problem we run into is that the
    bean counters and pointy haired types above us don't always approve
    either the funds or the position itself. Then, we've got to lower
    our sights.

    >But I'm happy to find a good Intermediate or a highly intelligent and
    >motivated Junior and mentor them up. Export isn't needed to start
    >and certifications are so close to the zero point of expertese
    >they don't register.


    I suspect this is true for most employers. It's certainly the reason
    we work with the local universities/colleges providing intern jobs.
    Some people consider this a form of slave labor (an intern position
    really doesn't pay well), but it works well for the student who is
    getting real experience, and for the employer who gets to see which
    one is going to be the best of the crop.

    Old guy

  13. Re: Solaris Certification

    ibupro...@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) wrote:
    > Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >
    > NOTE: Posting from groups.google.com (or some web-forums) dramatically
    > reduces the chance of your post being seen. *Find a real news server.


    Noted. Just to let you know I've long since decided that a
    real NSP supplies a web viewing interface that is able to
    handle kill files. Years ago I used "real news clients" and
    I've since given up on them for assorted reasons.

    > >Back in 2000 I did the basic Cisco certifications. *I've since
    > >been-there-done-that with some data center migrations, large
    > >WAN audits and so on. *So I let the certifications lapse and
    > >now let my hands on experiences do the talking.
    > >Back in 2005 I got certified in EMC SAN work. *Same deal.
    > >At the time declaring myself Junior in the field made good
    > >sense. *I've since been-there-done-that with more data center
    > >migrations, migrations of live frame data without taking hosts
    > >down, doing BCV stuff, you name it. *So I've let that certification
    > >lapse as well. *Once again I will let my experience do the
    > >talking as I'm no loonger Junior in that sub-field either.

    >
    > But where were you back then?


    In the specific sub-fields of nethead and SANhead I was in
    those respective years about the level of SAGE Junior as
    documented in the booklet.

    > Did you have other skills/experience
    > that an employer would want, or do you feel that the certifications
    > (or the training for the certifications) made the difference??


    I've exceeded the level of SAGE Senior as documented in
    the booklet since approximately the time the scale was
    designed in the first place in the mid 1990s. Heck, I've
    taken positions specifically to be able to get one more
    check-off from the list in the booklet. For over a decade I
    haven't been able to find a job that was able to get me more
    than one additional check-off. There are very few left and I
    don't ever expect to need a higher level of security clearance
    than the one I held back in 2000 so at least one I doubt I'll
    ever be able to check. I started in SysAdmin in 1981 so I
    have had plenty of time in field to build up my skills and
    manage to get nearly all of the check-offs. Supercomputers,
    production data centers, engineering groups, CAD/CAM,
    modem banks, you name it I've had the time in field to be
    able to go for it and do it.

    I didn't need the certifications for anything but non-monetary
    "praise in public" stuff at those times. They got me at-a-boy
    recognition by bunches of peers. Thing is, I was well aware
    that any IT certification is a declaration of being SAGE Junior
    in that part of the field. I was SAGE Junior in nethead at the
    time I took my Cisco certs in 2000. I was SAGE Junior in
    SANhead back in 2005 (hmmm, if I looked it up on my old
    resume it was probably 2004) when I took my EMC cert. I
    don't have a problem with being what I see as accurate about
    my skills like that.

    The deal with SysAdmin is it's master of all trades, jack of
    none. Whatever is the major app at your place, learn it inside
    and out. If your group is merged with the networking folks,
    learn networking from layer 1 up on every technology around.
    SAN group same deal. Database group same deal (I'm at
    an Oracle focused company lately).

    My history with certs isn't the same as a new Novice looking
    to use a cert to get declared Junior to break into the field. I
    entered at a time there were no certs. Or is my situation
    applicable? I got a Cisco cert then immediately started
    doing the nethead parts of data center migrations, WAN
    audits, you name it, until my experience exceeded Junior
    and the cert no longer mattered. I got an EMC cert then
    immediately got added into the on-call cycle of the SAN team
    and started doing zoning, allocation, SRDF planning, you
    name it, until my exeprience exceeded Junior and the cert
    no longer mattered.

    This is how my experience with certs applies to folks new
    to the SysAdmin field in general - I was working in a related
    subfield because I'd taken what job I could get. Then I used
    my certs to be able to transfer to a different subfield and
    start working in it. Certs don't help much if you're a chef
    trying to break into SysAdmin, but they work just fine if
    you're an operator or developer trying to break into SysAdmin,
    or an other-OS SysAdmin trying to break into UNIX SysAdmin.

    > Agree - nothing matches having your hands dirty because you're actually
    > in there taking it apart, putting it back together - seeing how it all
    > works.


    Right. Starting point - Get a job in as closely related a field
    as you can (I started as a developer) then work transfers
    using certs whenever they will help.

    > >The better the moentor you find the better your progress.

    >
    > Faster and further.


    This can not be stressed enough. Good mentoring beats
    certification hands down. Good mentors have contacts among
    their other skills. And being good, former colleagues remember
    and respect that mentor.

    > >Thing is, I'm happy to hire folks who aren't yet experts. *Sure, I
    > >want to hire more SAGE Senior SysAdmins, who doesn't.

    >
    > "want to hire" - you betcha! *The problem we run into is that the
    > bean counters and pointy haired types above us don't always approve
    > either the funds or the position itself. Then, we've got to lower
    > our sights.
    >
    > >But I'm happy to find a good Intermediate or a highly intelligent and
    > >motivated Junior and mentor them up. *Expert isn't needed to start
    > >and certifications are so close to the zero point of expertese
    > >they don't register.

    >
    > I suspect this is true for most employers. It's certainly the reason
    > we work with the local universities/colleges providing intern jobs.
    > Some people consider this a form of slave labor (an intern position
    > really doesn't pay well), but it works well for the student who is
    > getting real experience, and for the employer who gets to see which
    > one is going to be the best of the crop.


    I started as an intern lo these many years ago. We used
    bearskins and stone knives. Core memory even.

  14. Re: Solaris Certification

    On Mon, 23 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.unix.admin, in article
    ,
    Doug Freyburger wrote:

    NOTE: Posting from groups.google.com (or some web-forums) dramatically
    reduces the chance of your post being seen. Find a real news server.

    >ibupro...@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) wrote:


    >Noted. Just to let you know I've long since decided that a
    >real NSP supplies a web viewing interface that is able to
    >handle kill files. Years ago I used "real news clients" and
    >I've since given up on them for assorted reasons.


    That note is auto-included in any response to a post via
    groups.google.com or several specific web-forum to Usenet gateways.
    There are enough people killfiling such posts that it can make a
    difference.

    >> Did you have other skills/experience that an employer would want, or
    >> do you feel that the certifications (or the training for the
    >> certifications) made the difference??

    >
    >I've exceeded the level of SAGE Senior as documented in
    >the booklet since approximately the time the scale was
    >designed in the first place in the mid 1990s. Heck, I've
    >taken positions specifically to be able to get one more
    >check-off from the list in the booklet.


    OK

    >I didn't need the certifications for anything but non-monetary
    >"praise in public" stuff at those times. They got me at-a-boy
    >recognition by bunches of peers.


    That's more the answer I was looking for.

    >My history with certs isn't the same as a new Novice looking
    >to use a cert to get declared Junior to break into the field. I
    >entered at a time there were no certs. Or is my situation
    >applicable? I got a Cisco cert then immediately started
    >doing the nethead parts of data center migrations, WAN
    >audits, you name it, until my experience exceeded Junior
    >and the cert no longer mattered. I got an EMC cert then
    >immediately got added into the on-call cycle of the SAN team
    >and started doing zoning, allocation, SRDF planning, you
    >name it, until my exeprience exceeded Junior and the cert
    >no longer mattered.


    So if I read this correctly, you feel that the certifications
    are worth the equivalent of minimum exposure to a specific field,
    and once you start working in that field, the value of the
    certificate soon no longer matters.

    >This is how my experience with certs applies to folks new
    >to the SysAdmin field in general - I was working in a related
    >subfield because I'd taken what job I could get. Then I used
    >my certs to be able to transfer to a different subfield and
    >start working in it. Certs don't help much if you're a chef
    >trying to break into SysAdmin, but they work just fine if
    >you're an operator or developer trying to break into SysAdmin,
    >or an other-OS SysAdmin trying to break into UNIX SysAdmin.


    Beyond certification, this is also true of even several years
    of book learning as part of a CS degree. You've also got to get
    those hands dirty. Some time ago, I interviews someone who had
    done ~3 years, and had gotten several certs along the way. His
    failure was not have any experience to speak of - something as
    simple as CIDR was lost (he was still Class-ful) on him.

    >> Agree - nothing matches having your hands dirty because you're
    >> actually in there taking it apart, putting it back together -
    >> seeing how it all works.

    >
    >Right. Starting point - Get a job in as closely related a field
    >as you can (I started as a developer) then work transfers
    >using certs whenever they will help.


    I'll go further, and state that getting a set or three of the
    CDs/DVD to allow you to install Solaris (or *BSD, or even the
    more fundamental variants of Linux) on one or more systems at
    home, and be able to poke around it is also important. I interviewed
    an intern candidate recently, and during the interview, she mentioned
    using Linux at home (something that wasn't in her resume - probably
    rightly so). I thought - "oh, boy - another icon-clicker" but asked a
    few leading questions (expecting blank looks for answers). I was
    pleasantly surprised when she was able to answer with little
    hesitation (we're networking, so it was stuff like explaining the
    output of /sbin/ifconfig, why a host route is chosen over a network
    route, network masks, DNS record types, and so on). We grabbed her on
    the spot, and she's even coming back for the summer. If a position
    opens up, I'll be happy to hire her full time. Why? "Dirty hands!"

    >>>The better the moentor you find the better your progress.

    >>
    >> Faster and further.

    >
    >This can not be stressed enough. Good mentoring beats
    >certification hands down. Good mentors have contacts among
    >their other skills. And being good, former colleagues remember
    >and respect that mentor.


    VERY true. And this comes in even more handy when the job market is
    tight. "Networking" has another meaning besides passing packets over
    the wires or similar.

    Old guy

  15. Re: Solaris Certification

    On Jun 24, 6:44*am, ibupro...@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) wrote:
    > On Mon, 23 Jun 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.unix.admin, in article
    > ,
    >
    > Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >
    > NOTE: Posting from groups.google.com (or some web-forums) dramatically
    > reduces the chance of your post being seen. *Find a real news server.
    >
    > >ibupro...@painkiller.example.tld (Moe Trin) wrote:
    > >Noted. *Just to let you know I've long since decided that a
    > >real NSP supplies a web viewing interface that is able to
    > >handle kill files. *Years ago I used "real news clients" and
    > >I've since given up on them for assorted reasons.

    >
    > That note is auto-included in any response to a post via
    > groups.google.com or several specific web-forum to Usenet gateways.
    > There are enough people killfiling such posts that it can make a
    > difference.
    >
    > >> Did you have other skills/experience that an employer would want, or
    > >> do you feel that the certifications (or the training for the
    > >> certifications) made the difference??

    >
    > >I've exceeded the level of SAGE Senior as documented in
    > >the booklet since approximately the time the scale was
    > >designed in the first place in the mid 1990s. *Heck, I've
    > >taken positions specifically to be able to get one more
    > >check-off from the list in the booklet.

    >
    > OK
    >
    > >I didn't need the certifications for anything but non-monetary
    > >"praise in public" stuff at those times. *They got me at-a-boy
    > >recognition by bunches of peers.

    >
    > That's more the answer I was looking for.
    >
    > >My history with certs isn't the same as a new Novice looking
    > >to use a cert to get declared Junior to break into the field. *I
    > >entered at a time there were no certs. *Or is my situation
    > >applicable? *I got a Cisco cert then immediately started
    > >doing the nethead parts of data center migrations, WAN
    > >audits, you name it, until my experience exceeded Junior
    > >and the cert no longer mattered. *I got an EMC cert then
    > >immediately got added into the on-call cycle of the SAN team
    > >and started doing zoning, allocation, SRDF planning, you
    > >name it, until my exeprience exceeded Junior and the cert
    > >no longer mattered.

    >
    > So if I read this correctly, you feel that the certifications
    > are worth the equivalent of minimum exposure to a specific field,
    > and once you start working in that field, the value of the
    > certificate soon no longer matters.
    >
    > >This is how my experience with certs applies to folks new
    > >to the SysAdmin field in general - I was working in a related
    > >subfield because I'd taken what job I could get. *Then I used
    > >my certs to be able to transfer to a different subfield and
    > >start working in it. *Certs don't help much if you're a chef
    > >trying to break into SysAdmin, but they work just fine if
    > >you're an operator or developer trying to break into SysAdmin,
    > >or an other-OS SysAdmin trying to break into UNIX SysAdmin.

    >
    > Beyond certification, this is also true of even several years
    > of book learning as part of a CS degree. You've also got to get
    > those hands dirty. Some time ago, I interviews someone who had
    > done ~3 years, and had gotten several certs along the way. His
    > failure was not have any experience to speak of - something as
    > simple as CIDR was lost (he was still Class-ful) on him.
    >
    > >> Agree - nothing matches having your hands dirty because you're
    > >> actually in there taking it apart, putting it back together -
    > >> seeing how it all works.

    >
    > >Right. *Starting point - Get a job in as closely related a field
    > >as you can (I started as a developer) then work transfers
    > >using certs whenever they will help.

    >
    > I'll go further, and state that getting a set or three of the
    > CDs/DVD to allow you to install Solaris (or *BSD, or even the
    > more fundamental variants of Linux) on one or more systems at
    > home, and be able to poke around it is also important. I interviewed
    > an intern candidate recently, and during the interview, she mentioned
    > using Linux at home (something that wasn't in her resume - probably
    > rightly so). I thought - "oh, boy - another icon-clicker" but asked a
    > few leading questions (expecting blank looks for answers). *I was
    > pleasantly surprised when she was able to answer with little
    > hesitation (we're networking, so it was stuff like explaining the
    > output of /sbin/ifconfig, why a host route is chosen over a network
    > route, network masks, DNS record types, and so on). We grabbed her on
    > the spot, and she's even coming back for the summer. If a position
    > opens up, I'll be happy to hire her full time. Why? *"Dirty hands!"
    >
    > >>>The better the moentor you find the better your progress.

    >
    > >> Faster and further.

    >
    > >This can not be stressed enough. *Good mentoring beats
    > >certification hands down. *Good mentors have contacts among
    > >their other skills. *And being good, former colleagues remember
    > >and respect that mentor.

    >
    > VERY true. And this comes in even more handy when the job market is
    > tight. "Networking" has another meaning besides passing packets over
    > the wires or similar.
    >
    > * * * * Old guy


    Hello,
    Back to that conversation I have some questions not to waste your
    times but their answers are vital to me to start the certification
    self study.
    1-What are there pre-exams in Sun before passing that exam Solaris10
    Administration ?
    2-What are the list of the most important books that I should buy ?
    Please describe as possible as you can.
    3-What are the books that I can buy them new ones ? and what can I buy
    used ones ? Which has press and publishing errors ?
    4-what are the optimum machines I have to buy them used to have full
    practical practise ?

    Thanks for you cp-operation.
    Ehab


  16. Re: Solaris Certification

    Andrew Gabriel wrote:
    > In article ,
    > "Richard B. Gilbert" writes:
    >> The machines I purchased came with SMALL disks or NO disks. Be prepared
    >> to buy and install disks of 20 GB or larger. The Ultra 5 and 10 use
    >> EIDE disks.
    >>
    >> I don't believe 20 GB disks are made any longer and the smallest
    >> available new are 40 GB. 80 GB disks are available for about $10 US
    >> more than 40 GB drives. The largest usable disk is 127 GB.
    >> You can install a disk larger than 127 GB but you will only be able to
    >> use the first 127 GB.

    >
    > I vaguely recall it's a bit worse than that. The size you see is
    > the disk size modulo 127GB, i.e. if you put 140GB drive in, you'll
    > see 13GB :-(
    >


    This is the first I've heard of such a thing and I've been following
    this newsgroup for about four years now. In any case, 40 and 80 GB
    drives are available and either will work just fine!

    Anyone who needs more can put a SCSI HBA in the box and use as many as
    fifteen external disks if the HBA supports that many. Seven are for
    sure and should be enough for most people.


  17. Re: ATA disks in ultra5/10 hardware (Was: Re: Solaris Certification)

    On 06 Aug 2008 23:34:57 GMT,
    Andrew Gabriel wrote:
    >
    > I vaguely recall it's a bit worse than that. The size you see is
    > the disk size modulo 127GB, i.e. if you put 140GB drive in, you'll
    > see 13GB :-(


    Uh, I have a 200GB disk in my U5 and I didn't see those problems with
    it, except that the (P)ATA33 interface is *cough* a tad slow. Admittedly
    it's currently sitting in a corner because FreeBSD 7.0 didn't want to
    play ball[1], so what solaris makes of it I can't say. I could dust off
    the old copy of sol10 I have sitting around and see what that does, if
    anyone's interested.

    I'm told one could try and stick a SATA PCI card in it, which could
    speed things up a bit. Might need a macintosh version (ie one with
    openboot support) instead of the regular pc version if you want to boot
    from it, or maybe that won't work at all. I don't know. If anyone
    tries, it'd be nice to hear if it works or not.


    [1] Something funky with the ATA drivers. 5.* didn't have that problem.

    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

  18. Re: ATA disks in ultra5/10 hardware (Was: Re: Solaris Certification)

    On 07 Aug 2008 08:02:13 GMT,
    Andrew Gabriel wrote:
    > The openboot prom in the Ultra 5/10 will recognise some LSI logic
    > SCSI controllers and boot from them (without requiring openboot
    > firmware). Probably need to look for old ones though. These give
    > you quite a performance boost over the embedded PATA.


    Nice if you have those lying around, and matching SCSI disks. For me
    this isn't a server, but a play-develop-tinker-learn box that could use
    a speed boost but doesn't come with a budget. Getting a SATA disk is
    cheaper, quieter, and probably more performant for this purpose[1].

    So I'd still like to hear about SATA experiences with ultra fives. :-)


    [1] Note the _for this purpose bit_: For other applications I'd indeed
    prefer SCSI -- and get the budget to go with it.

    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

  19. Re: ATA disks in ultra5/10 hardware (Was: Re: Solaris Certification)

    On Aug 7, 11:23*am, jpd wrote:
    > On 07 Aug 2008 08:02:13 GMT,
    >
    > Andrew Gabriel wrote:
    > > The openboot prom in the Ultra 5/10 will recognise some LSI logic
    > > SCSI controllers and boot from them (without requiring openboot
    > > firmware). Probably need to look for old ones though. These give
    > > you quite a performance boost over the embedded PATA.

    >
    > Nice if you have those lying around, and matching SCSI disks. For me
    > this isn't a server, but a play-develop-tinker-learn box that could use
    > a speed boost but doesn't come with a budget. Getting a SATA disk is
    > cheaper, quieter, and probably more performant for this purpose[1].
    >
    > So I'd still like to hear about SATA experiences with ultra fives. :-)
    >
    > [1] Note the _for this purpose bit_: For other applications I'd indeed
    > * * prefer SCSI -- and get the budget to go with it.
    >
    > --
    > * j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    > * This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    > * Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    > * consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.


    Again Sorry for repeating the question :
    What are the less error books that I can buy ??

  20. Re: Solaris Certification again (Was: ATA disks in ultra5/10

    On Thu, 07 Aug 2008 01:38:31 -0700, happytoday wrote:

    [...]

    > Again Sorry for repeating the question : What are the less error books
    > that I can buy ??


    The O'Reilly books generally have a good reputation.

    http://oreilly.com/
    --
    A beautiful man is paradise for the eyes, hell for the soul, and
    purgatory for the purse.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast