Volume Manager license hacking - SUN

This is a discussion on Volume Manager license hacking - SUN ; We have a production Sun E220 with VxVM installed and the license report shows: Node Lock Type = (Hostid and Architecture ID) I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same license (I hacked ...

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  1. Volume Manager license hacking

    We have a production Sun E220 with VxVM installed and the license
    report shows:

    Node Lock Type = (Hostid and Architecture ID)

    I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same
    license (I hacked the hostid to match E220), but not sure what
    Architecture ID really means. Will VxVM sense that the hardware is
    different and prevent install? I'm only planning to test a few VxVM
    utilities and don't want to screw around with production server.

    Thanks
    Roger


  2. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    unix wrote:
    >
    > I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same
    > license (I hacked the hostid to match E220), but not sure what
    > Architecture ID really means. Will VxVM sense that the hardware is
    > different and prevent install? I'm only planning to test a few VxVM
    > utilities and don't want to screw around with production server.
    >


    This isn't criticism but I am just curious. With Sun's free
    offering/bundling of Online Disksuite and ZFS, would it be necessary
    ever to pay Veritas for a volume manager?


    --
    Godlessness, torture and fornication are the hallmarks of our great(sic)
    society.

  3. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    On Apr 9, 9:54 am, "unix" wrote:
    > We have a production Sun E220 with VxVM installed and the license
    > report shows:
    >
    > Node Lock Type = (Hostid and Architecture ID)
    >
    > I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same
    > license (I hacked the hostid to match E220), but not sure what
    > Architecture ID really means. Will VxVM sense that the hardware is
    > different and prevent install? I'm only planning to test a few VxVM
    > utilities and don't want to screw around with production server.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Roger


    I am not encouraging the use of a duplicate license but simply trying
    to answer the question.
    In order to use that same license, the host ID and architecture must
    be the same or lesser tier server. Also, it depends on the vxvm
    version. 4.1 and later are not node lock, so the only dependency are
    tiers.




  4. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    On Apr 9, 12:23 pm, Mikail Dellovich wrote:
    > unix wrote:
    >
    > > I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same
    > > license (I hacked the hostid to match E220), but not sure what
    > > Architecture ID really means. Will VxVM sense that the hardware is
    > > different and prevent install? I'm only planning to test a few VxVM
    > > utilities and don't want to screw around with production server.

    >
    > This isn't criticism but I am just curious. With Sun's free
    > offering/bundling of Online Disksuite and ZFS, would it be necessary
    > ever to pay Veritas for a volume manager?
    >
    > --
    > Godlessness, torture and fornication are the hallmarks of our great(sic)
    > society.


    Two different animals. Aside from many bells and whistles you get with
    Veritas offerings (VCS, DB edition for Oracle, etc), the command set
    is very different. I need to simulate VxVM utilities in a test
    environment. The right way is obviously is to have same OS and same
    packages.


  5. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    On Apr 9, 1:36 pm, "Adam Sanders" wrote:
    > On Apr 9, 9:54 am, "unix" wrote:
    >
    > > We have a production Sun E220 with VxVM installed and the license
    > > report shows:

    >
    > > Node Lock Type = (Hostid and Architecture ID)

    >
    > > I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same
    > > license (I hacked the hostid to match E220), but not sure what
    > > Architecture ID really means. Will VxVM sense that the hardware is
    > > different and prevent install? I'm only planning to test a few VxVM
    > > utilities and don't want to screw around with production server.

    >
    > > Thanks
    > > Roger

    >
    > I am not encouraging the use of a duplicate license but simply trying
    > to answer the question.
    > In order to use that same license, the host ID and architecture must
    > be the same or lesser tier server. Also, it depends on the vxvm
    > version. 4.1 and later are not node lock, so the only dependency are
    > tiers.


    I have version 3.5. On the production box it says :
    PERMANENT_NODE_LOCK.


  6. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    On Apr 9, 12:36 pm, "Adam Sanders" wrote:
    > On Apr 9, 9:54 am, "unix" wrote:
    >
    > > We have a production Sun E220 with VxVM installed and the license
    > > report shows:

    >
    > > Node Lock Type = (Hostid and Architecture ID)

    >
    > > I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same
    > > license (I hacked the hostid to match E220), but not sure what
    > > Architecture ID really means. Will VxVM sense that the hardware is
    > > different and prevent install? I'm only planning to test a few VxVM
    > > utilities and don't want to screw around with production server.

    >
    > > Thanks
    > > Roger

    >
    > I am not encouraging the use of a duplicate license but simply trying
    > to answer the question.
    > In order to use that same license, the host ID and architecture must
    > be the same or lesser tier server. Also, it depends on the vxvm
    > version. 4.1 and later are not node lock, so the only dependency are
    > tiers.


    You can easily check the licensing w/o risking impact to the box where
    you want to install. Just install the VRTSvlic package and then apply
    the license with vxlicinst [-k]. If it doesn't work, remove the
    VRTSvlic package. If it is accepted, run the the CPI installer. The
    installer will not complete if the license is invalid.



  7. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    In article <131kq7at4cnvrd7@news.supernews.com>,
    Mikail Dellovich wrote:
    >unix wrote:
    >>

    >This isn't criticism but I am just curious. With Sun's free
    >offering/bundling of Online Disksuite and ZFS, would it be necessary
    >ever to pay Veritas for a volume manager?


    And, with Storage Foundation Basic, why would you bother with SVM and ZFS
    (ZFS is fine, but SVM? Are you serious??)?

    Remember, SF Basic is free, too.

    -tom

    --

    "You can only be -so- accurate with a claw-hammer." --me

  8. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    In article <1176130451.108448.251120@b75g2000hsg.googlegroups. com>,
    unix wrote:
    >We have a production Sun E220 with VxVM installed and the license
    >report shows:
    >
    >Node Lock Type = (Hostid and Architecture ID)
    >
    >I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same
    >license (I hacked the hostid to match E220), but not sure what
    >Architecture ID really means. Will VxVM sense that the hardware is
    >different and prevent install? I'm only planning to test a few VxVM
    >utilities and don't want to screw around with production server.


    Well, if the Ultra 10 is a test system and why not just try it and see
    what happens. It's not like the VxVM software is going to render the
    box a smoking pile of slag if it doesn't like the key.

    -tom

    --

    "You can only be -so- accurate with a claw-hammer." --me

  9. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    In comp.unix.solaris unix wrote:
    > We have a production Sun E220 with VxVM installed and the license
    > report shows:
    >
    > Node Lock Type = (Hostid and Architecture ID)
    >
    > I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same
    > license (I hacked the hostid to match E220), but not sure what
    > Architecture ID really means. Will VxVM sense that the hardware is
    > different and prevent install? I'm only planning to test a few VxVM
    > utilities and don't want to screw around with production server.


    When you install VxVM, it should (or at least it used to) set itself up
    with a free temporary license key, good for 30 days. If it doesn't, then
    you can phone your Sun/Veritas provider and get a demo license key for
    free which does the same thing.

    Colin

  10. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    In comp.unix.solaris Thomas H Jones II wrote:
    > In article <131kq7at4cnvrd7@news.supernews.com>,
    > Mikail Dellovich wrote:
    >>unix wrote:
    >>>

    >>This isn't criticism but I am just curious. With Sun's free
    >>offering/bundling of Online Disksuite and ZFS, would it be necessary
    >>ever to pay Veritas for a volume manager?

    >
    > And, with Storage Foundation Basic, why would you bother with SVM and ZFS
    > (ZFS is fine, but SVM? Are you serious??)?
    >
    > Remember, SF Basic is free, too.


    Have you actually installed the SF Basic? It's a complete and utter disaster!
    After dealing with VxVM for many years, every version and patch level from
    3.0.4 onwards, SF Basic was the first one that I was unable to get running
    on a test system. This was a fresh install of Solaris with the full/OEM
    bundle, and under Solaris 8, 9, or 10, the SF Basic installer blew itself
    up, leaving half-installed and unusable crap behind.

    As near as I can see, SF Basic as a free product is Symantec's attempt at
    convincing everyone to stop using VxVM products, so they can kill off the
    line.

    Colin

  11. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    On Apr 9, 9:54 am, "unix" wrote:
    > I'm trying to have an Ultra 10 in the lab run VxVM with the same
    > license (I hacked the hostid to match E220), but not sure what
    > Architecture ID really means. Will VxVM sense that the hardware is
    > different and prevent install? I'm only planning to test a few VxVM
    > utilities and don't want to screw around with production server.


    If it's just a lab scenario, ask your salesperson for a 60-day demo
    license. It fully enables the product for 60 days.


  12. Re: Volume Manager license hacking

    On Apr 9, 9:41 pm, fer...@xanthia.com (Thomas H Jones II) wrote:
    > In article <1176130451.108448.251...@b75g2000hsg.googlegroups. com>,


    > Well, if the Ultra 10 is a test system and why not just try it and see
    > what happens. It's not like the VxVM software is going to render the
    > box a smoking pile of slag if it doesn't like the key.


    No, you need to have encapsulated the system disks for it do to that.

    --tim

    (This is actually an answer (in light disguise) to another article you
    posted in this thread, I'm just attaching it to the wrong branch to
    put you off the scent & generally cause confusion, it being Friday
    afternoon and the sun over the yard arm (well, it's foggy here, but it
    would be over the yard arm if we could see it, especially since we had
    it (the arm, not the sun) lowered).)


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