Partition id tags in format - what are they? - SUN

This is a discussion on Partition id tags in format - what are they? - SUN ; IF you run format on a SPARC box (and I guess x86 too) to partition a disk, you have to choose a partition id tag partition> 0 Part Tag Flag Cylinders Size Blocks 0 root wm 0 - 825 2.00GB ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Partition id tags in format - what are they?

  1. Partition id tags in format - what are they?

    IF you run format on a SPARC box (and I guess x86 too) to partition a
    disk, you have to choose a partition id tag

    partition> 0
    Part Tag Flag Cylinders Size Blocks
    0 root wm 0 - 825 2.00GB (826/0/0) 4196080

    Enter partition id tag[root]: ?
    Expecting one of the following: (abbreviations ok):
    unassigned boot root swap
    usr backup stand var
    home alternates reserved

    I have always used 'root' for the root partition on a disk, 'swap' if I
    needed a swap space, 'backup' for the whole disk on slice 2 &
    'unassigned' if I'm not going to use them.

    But playing around a bit with different names, for example setting a
    partition to swap and then unassigned, I find I can still run newfs on
    it to create a file system and mount it in the normal way. So what is
    the point of the different names?

    I assume 'backup' does have some significance (being normally the whole
    disk on slice 2), as format seems to complain if you treat that wrong,
    but I can't seem to see what the the reason for all the other choices are.


    --
    Dave K

    http://www.southminster-branch-line.org.uk/

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually. The month is
    always written in 3 letters (e.g. Jan, not January etc)

  2. Re: Partition id tags in format - what are they?

    Dave wrote:

    > But playing around a bit with different names, for example setting a
    > partition to swap and then unassigned, I find I can still run newfs on
    > it to create a file system and mount it in the normal way


    What I meant was, I run newfs twice - once with the tag set to
    unassigned and another time set to swap. The partition could be mounted
    in both cases, implying the tag name is not that important.

    --
    Dave K

    http://www.southminster-branch-line.org.uk/

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually. The month is
    always written in 3 letters (e.g. Jan, not January etc)

  3. Re: Partition id tags in format - what are they?

    Dave writes:
    >IF you run format on a SPARC box (and I guess x86 too) to partition a
    >disk, you have to choose a partition id tag


    >partition> 0
    >Part Tag Flag Cylinders Size Blocks
    > 0 root wm 0 - 825 2.00GB (826/0/0) 4196080

    ....
    >But playing around a bit with different names, for example setting a
    >partition to swap and then unassigned, I find I can still run newfs on
    >it to create a file system and mount it in the normal way. So what is
    >the point of the different names?



    To help you out remember what each slice is. Nothing more.


  4. Re: Partition id tags in format - what are they?


    Dave wrote:
    > IF you run format on a SPARC box (and I guess x86 too) to partition a
    > disk, you have to choose a partition id tag
    >
    > partition> 0
    > Part Tag Flag Cylinders Size Blocks
    > 0 root wm 0 - 825 2.00GB (826/0/0) 4196080
    >
    > Enter partition id tag[root]: ?
    > Expecting one of the following: (abbreviations ok):
    > unassigned boot root swap
    > usr backup stand var
    > home alternates reserved
    >
    > I have always used 'root' for the root partition on a disk, 'swap' if I
    > needed a swap space, 'backup' for the whole disk on slice 2 &
    > 'unassigned' if I'm not going to use them.
    >
    > But playing around a bit with different names, for example setting a
    > partition to swap and then unassigned, I find I can still run newfs on
    > it to create a file system and mount it in the normal way. So what is
    > the point of the different names?
    >
    > I assume 'backup' does have some significance (being normally the whole
    > disk on slice 2), as format seems to complain if you treat that wrong,
    > but I can't seem to see what the the reason for all the other choices are.



    If your program uses /usr/include/sys/vtoc.h
    for some purpose.......


    //Lars


  5. Re: Partition id tags in format - what are they?

    In comp.unix.solaris Dave wrote:
    > But playing around a bit with different names, for example setting a
    > partition to swap and then unassigned, I find I can still run newfs on
    > it to create a file system and mount it in the normal way. So what is
    > the point of the different names?


    This came up a few days ago...

    http://groups.google.com/group/comp....03cdf577009363

    --
    Darren Dunham ddunham@taos.com
    Senior Technical Consultant TAOS http://www.taos.com/
    Got some Dr Pepper? San Francisco, CA bay area
    < This line left intentionally blank to confuse you. >

+ Reply to Thread