How-to Upgrade your Macbook Pro internal hard disk and retain yourBoot Camp partition - Storage

This is a discussion on How-to Upgrade your Macbook Pro internal hard disk and retain yourBoot Camp partition - Storage ; Right, I've just upgraded the internal hard disk on my 17" Macbook Pro, and kept my Boot Camp Windows XP install working. I thought it worth posting a quick how-to on this, as it's not entirely trivial - normal cloning ...

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  1. How-to Upgrade your Macbook Pro internal hard disk and retain yourBoot Camp partition

    Right, I've just upgraded the internal hard disk on my 17" Macbook
    Pro, and kept my Boot Camp Windows XP install working.
    I thought it worth posting a quick how-to on this, as it's not
    entirely trivial - normal cloning software like CCC and SuperDuper
    won't help you with your BootCamp partition.

    First off, the drive replacement. On the Macbook it's easy. On the
    Pro, less so: it requires dismantling the top casing of your laptop.
    This isn't too bad if you're handy with a screwdriver, but you could
    royally screw up your machine whilst simultaneously voiding your
    warranty if you're less experienced. Your call.
    I found a four-pack of Carlsberg at 1 a.m. to be my ideal time, but
    again, YMMV.

    First off, get yourself a firewire or USB drive caddy. Intel Macs can
    use USB, PPC ones not as we're going to boot off it later.
    Stick in your new big drive, and initialise using Disk Utility as Mac
    OS Journalled. Download and run SuperDuper from Shirtpocket to clone
    old drive to new one.
    When done, restart your Mac, hold down ALT and choose the new drive as
    a boot disk and check it works. OK? Right, time to swap drives.

    As ever, iFixit comes up with a good guide to doing this. Read before
    hand. There are numerous Youtube guides, too, but I think the iFixit
    printed guides are easier to use. I'd recommend printing them out
    first, or having another computer to hand whilst dismantling your Mac.

    http://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Mac/MacB...lacement/85/8/

    You need a small cross head screwdriver, and a T6 Torx driver. I'd
    left my T6 at work so used the small screwdriver on my trusty
    Leatherman Squirt P4 to do the job: which it did admirably without
    messing up the rather nicely machined steel screws used inside the
    MBP.

    I'd also recommend an ashtray or large piece of paper onto which you
    can sellotape and annotate the screws you remove. Drop any on your
    carpet and you'll have a bugger of a job finding them again.

    Battery out, memory cover out with 4x screws. Unclip the RAM and put
    it somewhere safe.
    Remove the two torx screws either side of the RAM slot. Remove the
    three angled screws on the other side of the battery bay.
    Remove the 4 screws from each side of the laptop. Remove the 4 screws
    from the underside of the laptop and the two on the rear near the
    hinge.
    Open lid, and carefully lift up the top casing until it's free: do not
    pull too far or hard as the keyboard and trackpad are attached to the
    motherboard with a ribbon cable.
    You should be able to lift up the top casing and tilt it so it's
    covering the screen giving you access to the inside of your MBP. Lift
    the yellow sticky tape holding the ribbon cable and lift out the
    keyboard/mouse connector - you can now put the top casing somewhere
    safe.

    Unscrew the two screws on the right hand side of the old hard disk and
    lift out the 4 inch metal bar retaining the hard disk. By loosening
    the sticky tape holding the SATA cable to the drive you can now lift
    up the right hand side of the drive and carefully slide it up and out
    of the Mac. Pull off sticky tape on top and bottom of drive holding
    SATA/power connectors on and lift off the connector. Remove with a T6
    driver the 4 fixings on the sides of the drive and fit them to the new
    big disk. Attach the SATA/power connectors, tape back down and
    carefully slide back into the MBP.

    Replace all the screws you removed and reverse above instructions and
    you're ready for first power up.
    Mine took a few heart-stopping moments longer than normal for initial
    boot, before booting to my normal desktop. Phew.

    Now for Boot Camp.

    Run the Boot Camp assistant on the new drive and select the partition
    size you'd like. It can be bigger than your original if you'd like.
    Follow the prompts and then choose "Quit: I will install later" to go
    back to OS X. You now have a blank partition waiting for you to use
    it: what we're going to do is to transfer your old Windows install to
    it.

    Put your original hard disk in the external caddy.
    Download and install the excellent free Winclone from TwoCanoes and
    select "Image". Point it at the Boot Camp partition on your old
    drive, and tell it to image it to somewhere on your lovely new big
    internal drive. Wait for an hour or so.

    When complete, run Winclone again and choose "restore". Point it at
    the image file you created above, and tell it to restore to the new
    Boot Camp partition the Boot Camp Assistant just created.
    Hit go, and leave it. Mine took 10 hours to complete and took 15
    minutes before the log showed *anything* so be patient before assuming
    it's hung.

    When done, you should be able to disconnect the old drive via USB and
    reboot your Mac into your Boot Camp partition as normal by pressing
    ALT. You'll probably be prompted by Windows to run CHKDSK - if so,
    leave the prompt without pressing a key until it's finished. It'll
    reboot when done - press ALT as normal to select your Windows
    partition to boot from.

    You should end up booting into Windows as normal.

    Once you've confirmed all is well you can erase and reuse your
    original drive.

    Note that Winclone's a pretty good way of doing an image-based backup
    of your Windows partition from OS X.
    It's also an excellent way of *resizing* your Boot Camp partition if
    you need to: image the current one, erase the old partition and
    create a new bigger/smaller one using Boot Camp Assistant, and then
    use Winclone to restore the image file to the resized partition.

    Hope this helps someone - mail if you need more info.

    Ric

  2. Re: How-to Upgrade your Macbook Pro internal hard disk and retain your Boot Camp partition

    In article
    ,
    Ric wrote:

    > Right, I've just upgraded the internal hard disk on my 17" Macbook
    > Pro, and kept my Boot Camp Windows XP install working.
    > I thought it worth posting a quick how-to on this, as it's not
    > entirely trivial - normal cloning software like CCC and SuperDuper
    > won't help you with your BootCamp partition.


    Thanks, I saved your post and references for
    when I finally get around to replacing my 160GB
    internal drive on my one year old 15" MacBook Pro.

    I think higher capacity 7200rpm drives are now
    available that might work.

    Mark-

  3. Re: How-to Upgrade your Macbook Pro internal hard disk and retain your Boot Camp partition

    Dear Mark & friends:

    Mark Conrad wrote:

    >In article
    >,
    > Ric wrote:
    >
    >> Right, I've just upgraded the internal hard disk on my 17" Macbook
    >> Pro, and kept my Boot Camp Windows XP install working.
    >> I thought it worth posting a quick how-to on this, as it's not
    >> entirely trivial - normal cloning software like CCC and SuperDuper
    >> won't help you with your BootCamp partition.

    >
    >Thanks, I saved your post and references for
    >when I finally get around to replacing my 160GB
    >internal drive on my one year old 15" MacBook Pro.
    >
    >I think higher capacity 7200rpm drives are now
    >available that might work.
    >
    >Mark-


    But I have a doubt: I read in one of the pictures, that the replaced
    drive had a label on it telling that it has the "Firmware for Apple".
    Does it means that if I bought a standard disk drive in any non-Apple
    store will not work on my MacBook Pro? If that were the situation, we
    will be forced to go to the Apple Technical Store to get the new drive
    and to have it installed on our machines.


    Thanks
    Juan I. Cahis
    Santiago de Chile (South America)
    Note: Please forgive me for my bad English, I am trying to improve it!

  4. Re: How-to Upgrade your Macbook Pro internal hard disk and retain your Boot Camp partition

    On 2008-08-10 15:28:04 +0100, Juan I. Cahis
    said:

    > But I have a doubt: I read in one of the pictures, that the replaced
    > drive had a label on it telling that it has the "Firmware for Apple".
    > Does it means that if I bought a standard disk drive in any non-Apple
    > store will not work on my MacBook Pro? If that were the situation, we
    > will be forced to go to the Apple Technical Store to get the new drive
    > and to have it installed on our machines.


    You can put another manufacturer's drive in.

    I don't know why Apple have their own labelled firmware on drives they
    include, but it doesn't matter for you upgrading the drive.

    Cheers,

    Chris


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