RAID1 - what happens if your motherboard RAID controller dies? - Storage

This is a discussion on RAID1 - what happens if your motherboard RAID controller dies? - Storage ; On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 17:55:29 -0400, "Dan" wrote: > >> >> No, not a chance! The Windows drivers would never make use of routines >> inside the BIOS, as the BIOS routines are written for the Real Mode of ...

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Thread: RAID1 - what happens if your motherboard RAID controller dies?

  1. Re: RAID1 - what happens if your motherboard RAID controller dies?

    On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 17:55:29 -0400, "Dan"
    wrote:

    >
    >>
    >> No, not a chance! The Windows drivers would never make use of routines
    >> inside the BIOS, as the BIOS routines are written for the Real Mode of
    >> the processor, whereas Windows operates in Protected Mode. Real Mode
    >> routines will never work once the processor enters Protected Mode.
    >> Windows device drivers are basically translations of the BIOS routines
    >> from Real Mode to Protected Mode. The BIOS will pass some data
    >> structures stored in memory off to the Windows device drivers, but
    >> once those structures have been passed, the BIOS is ignored and
    >> essentially shut down, while the Windows device drivers take over all
    >> of the hardware I/O.
    >>

    > I posted earlier about deleting Raid.. I will have no problem with
    >reinstalling the os then Right? The Bios will allow acces to the dvd drive.
    >even though I have a clean system.? I know it is a stupid question, but I
    >always wondered when someone built a computer how they ever get to load the
    >driver for the External drives to install the OS?
    >
    >Dan
    >


    BIOS provides boot functionality for several types of
    devices, ATAPI and SATA optical drives being two of them, as
    well as other SCSI-like add in cards where the control is
    handed off to those.

    This means on any system for several years time you have the
    ability to boot from an optical drive, and the windows CD
    follows a bootable disc spec for that. The booted windows
    installation cd runs as designs and takes it from there.

    After deleting the array you just have to have already
    decided if you were going to install to a single drive that
    was formerly in the array, if you were wanting to set up a
    new array (which you may need to do BEFORE booting and
    installing windows to the array) by defining it in the raid
    controller bios menu (separate bios module, usually accessed
    by a keystroke after main bios module has finished running
    at boot-time), or if you instead wanted to install to some
    other drive.

  2. Re: RAID1 - what happens if your motherboard RAID controller dies?

    On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 13:30:28 -0700 (PDT), bbbl67
    wrote:

    >On Jun 2, 2:59 pm, "Squeeze" wrote:
    >> Says Yousuf Khan, comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage kOOk of the year Award nominee.

    >
    >Squeeze, I know you enjoy proudly showing off your generally low IQ,
    >but why lash out at the world due to your father ass-raping you as a
    >kid?


    Squeeze may not be a well behaved boy, but did we really
    need to know that you sit around thinking about men
    ass-raping boys?

  3. Re: RAID1 - what happens if your motherboard RAID controller dies?


    "kony" wrote in message
    news:51k954h31m619hb7hejjnve3c1o94gm2ls@4ax.com...
    > On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 17:55:29 -0400, "Dan"
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>>
    >>> No, not a chance! The Windows drivers would never make use of routines
    >>> inside the BIOS, as the BIOS routines are written for the Real Mode of
    >>> the processor, whereas Windows operates in Protected Mode. Real Mode
    >>> routines will never work once the processor enters Protected Mode.
    >>> Windows device drivers are basically translations of the BIOS routines
    >>> from Real Mode to Protected Mode. The BIOS will pass some data
    >>> structures stored in memory off to the Windows device drivers, but
    >>> once those structures have been passed, the BIOS is ignored and
    >>> essentially shut down, while the Windows device drivers take over all
    >>> of the hardware I/O.
    >>>

    >> I posted earlier about deleting Raid.. I will have no problem with
    >>reinstalling the os then Right? The Bios will allow acces to the dvd
    >>drive.
    >>even though I have a clean system.? I know it is a stupid question, but I
    >>always wondered when someone built a computer how they ever get to load
    >>the
    >>driver for the External drives to install the OS?
    >>
    >>Dan
    >>

    >
    > BIOS provides boot functionality for several types of
    > devices, ATAPI and SATA optical drives being two of them, as
    > well as other SCSI-like add in cards where the control is
    > handed off to those.
    >
    > This means on any system for several years time you have the
    > ability to boot from an optical drive, and the windows CD
    > follows a bootable disc spec for that. The booted windows
    > installation cd runs as designs and takes it from there.
    >
    > After deleting the array you just have to have already
    > decided if you were going to install to a single drive that
    > was formerly in the array, if you were wanting to set up a
    > new array (which you may need to do BEFORE booting and
    > installing windows to the array) by defining it in the raid
    > controller bios menu (separate bios module, usually accessed
    > by a keystroke after main bios module has finished running
    > at boot-time), or if you instead wanted to install to some
    > other drive.


    Thank you for your replies. This information was exactly what I was looking
    for and is very helpfull to me. Raid can be so confusing.

    Thanks again,
    Dan



  4. Re: RAID1 - what happens if your motherboard RAID controller dies?

    Dan wrote:
    > I posted earlier about deleting Raid.. I will have no problem with
    > reinstalling the os then Right? The Bios will allow acces to the dvd drive.
    > even though I have a clean system.? I know it is a stupid question, but I
    > always wondered when someone built a computer how they ever get to load the
    > driver for the External drives to install the OS?



    As others have said, the BIOS provides support for booting up off of
    several different kinds of drives. Most will provide support for
    IDE/SATA drives, as well CD/DVD-ROM drives, as well as USB-based drives
    (memory sticks and hard disks). Some very specialized BIOSes will
    provide RAID drive support too.

  5. Re: RAID1 - what happens if your motherboard RAID controller dies?

    On Jun 19, 4:33 pm, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > Dan wrote:
    > > I posted earlier about deleting Raid.. I will have no problem with
    > > reinstalling the os then Right? The Bios will allow acces to the dvd drive.
    > > even though I have a clean system.? I know it is a stupid question, but I
    > > always wondered when someone built a computer how they ever get to load the
    > > driver for the External drives to install the OS?

    >
    > As others have said, the BIOS provides support for booting up off of
    > several different kinds of drives. Most will provide support for
    > IDE/SATA drives, as well CD/DVD-ROM drives, as well as USB-based drives
    > (memory sticks and hard disks). Some very specialized BIOSes will
    > provide RAID drive support too.


    The cheap way is PCI support -- a couple SILICON Image 680 series
    chipsets for $15 ea. delivered. Promise, KOUMTEC (sp?), ROSEWILL,
    etc., whavetever your poison. Although I'm not much of a raiders fan,
    and and after the option to variously run multiple HDs/DVDs, it's with
    'most' DVDs there occurs something of a problem. Bus latency,
    firmware, I'm not exactly sure the solution, per se -- but buying
    either a PCI Serial/Parallel ATA raid/non-raid board these days, most
    "imply" if not stipulate DVD channel support -- is a misnomer from
    what I'm seeing. Many optical devices will balk at loading or
    subsequently misfunction. I've a couple of LG DVD writers I've been
    fighting a losing battle with a couple MBs and various controller (MB
    +PCI) configs, and after going through discussions, I can say I'm not
    the only one. Though NON-RAID appears a suggested optical
    alternative, I wouldn't stake a DVD on either for surety. DVD -
    issues- are a little more than just the occasional experience with
    these new "subset and
    cut-&-dry mini MBs" with a spare PCI slot or two, three at most.

  6. Re: RAID1 - what happens if your motherboard RAID controller dies?

    On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 16:29:42 -0700 (PDT), Flasherly
    wrote:

    >On Jun 19, 4:33 pm, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    >> Dan wrote:
    >> > I posted earlier about deleting Raid.. I will have no problem with
    >> > reinstalling the os then Right? The Bios will allow acces to the dvd drive.
    >> > even though I have a clean system.? I know it is a stupid question, but I
    >> > always wondered when someone built a computer how they ever get to load the
    >> > driver for the External drives to install the OS?

    >>
    >> As others have said, the BIOS provides support for booting up off of
    >> several different kinds of drives. Most will provide support for
    >> IDE/SATA drives, as well CD/DVD-ROM drives, as well as USB-based drives
    >> (memory sticks and hard disks). Some very specialized BIOSes will
    >> provide RAID drive support too.

    >
    >The cheap way is PCI support -- a couple SILICON Image 680 series
    >chipsets for $15 ea. delivered. Promise, KOUMTEC (sp?), ROSEWILL,
    >etc., whavetever your poison. Although I'm not much of a raiders fan,
    >and and after the option to variously run multiple HDs/DVDs, it's with
    >'most' DVDs there occurs something of a problem. Bus latency,
    >firmware, I'm not exactly sure the solution, per se -- but buying
    >either a PCI Serial/Parallel ATA raid/non-raid board these days, most
    >"imply" if not stipulate DVD channel support -- is a misnomer from
    >what I'm seeing. Many optical devices will balk at loading or
    >subsequently misfunction. I've a couple of LG DVD writers I've been
    >fighting a losing battle with a couple MBs and various controller (MB
    >+PCI) configs, and after going through discussions, I can say I'm not
    >the only one. Though NON-RAID appears a suggested optical
    >alternative, I wouldn't stake a DVD on either for surety. DVD -
    >issues- are a little more than just the occasional experience with
    >these new "subset and
    >cut-&-dry mini MBs" with a spare PCI slot or two, three at most.


    Typically with a RAID card, to support ATAPI (optical
    drives) it needs to either support that with a jumper change
    to non-RAID mode (no raid for anything attached) or have a
    non-RAID firmware flashed to it.

    Some cards, including many of the Silicon Image 0680 cards,
    have a spot on the PCB for non-raid jumper, but some (most?)
    have a jumper wire soldered there instead of the proper pin
    header to allow jumper changes.

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