Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller. - Storage

This is a discussion on Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller. - Storage ; A friend's 6-month old notebook has failed. Needless to say, she has irreplaceable files on the drive for which she has no backup. The drive apparently won't spin up. She's had a estimated price for data recovery, but this is ...

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  1. Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.

    A friend's 6-month old notebook has failed. Needless to say, she has
    irreplaceable files on the drive for which she has no backup. The drive
    apparently won't spin up. She's had a estimated price for data recovery, but
    this is totally outside her budget. It occurred to me that, assuming she
    wants the notebook working again anyway, she could buy an identical
    replacement drive and try swapping the controller boards over to see it the
    fault was on the controller rather than the mech. Would this be a reasonable
    thing to try? Or do the controllers have stuff like calibration info in
    flash that would render the idea non-feasible?


    Steve S
    --




  2. Re: Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.

    Previously "Steve S \(another one\)" wrote:
    > A friend's 6-month old notebook has failed. Needless to say, she has
    > irreplaceable files on the drive for which she has no backup.


    The usual comments about ignoring reality (disks fail) not changing
    reality apply.

    > The drive apparently won't spin up. She's had a estimated price for
    > data recovery, but this is totally outside her budget.


    If the files are irreplaceable, she will need to pay. Otherwise
    they will very likely turn out to have been replaceable after all.

    > It occurred to me that, assuming she wants the notebook working
    > again anyway, she could buy an identical replacement drive and try
    > swapping the controller boards over to see it the fault was on the
    > controller rather than the mech. Would this be a reasonable thing to
    > try?


    Yes, but the success rate is relatively low, and you need an exact
    match, which can be very hard to find. Also you may damage the drive
    further, by _any_ experimantation, which can increase the cost of
    recovery significantly.

    > Or do the controllers have stuff like calibration info in flash
    > that would render the idea non-feasible?


    That is why the success rate is relatively low. Depends also on
    the drive, I guess. The thing is that the "high" prices data
    recovery outfits ask are really quite reasonable, in relation to
    effort and expertise needed and the fact that they have to
    keep lot of spare parts in stock. Also the risk of a professional
    recovery outfit actually damaging your drive further, possibly
    beyond recovery, is pretty low.

    Still, there is a price range and there are cheaper and more
    expensive recovery outfits. There are also thos that will
    only charge for a successful recovery, but they may not even
    try more complicated cases or have to be more expensive in
    order to stay economically viable.

    Arno



  3. Re: Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.


    "Arno Wagner" wrote in message
    news:68dqajF2sd97fU1@mid.individual.net...
    > Previously "Steve S \(another one\)" wrote:
    >> A friend's 6-month old notebook has failed. Needless to say, she has
    >> irreplaceable files on the drive for which she has no backup.

    >
    > The usual comments about ignoring reality (disks fail) not changing
    > reality apply.
    >
    >> The drive apparently won't spin up. She's had a estimated price for
    >> data recovery, but this is totally outside her budget.

    >
    > If the files are irreplaceable, she will need to pay. Otherwise
    > they will very likely turn out to have been replaceable after all.
    >
    >> It occurred to me that, assuming she wants the notebook working
    >> again anyway, she could buy an identical replacement drive and try
    >> swapping the controller boards over to see it the fault was on the
    >> controller rather than the mech. Would this be a reasonable thing to
    >> try?

    >
    > Yes, but the success rate is relatively low, and you need an exact
    > match, which can be very hard to find. Also you may damage the drive
    > further, by _any_ experimantation, which can increase the cost of
    > recovery significantly.
    >
    >> Or do the controllers have stuff like calibration info in flash
    >> that would render the idea non-feasible?

    >
    > That is why the success rate is relatively low. Depends also on
    > the drive, I guess. The thing is that the "high" prices data
    > recovery outfits ask are really quite reasonable, in relation to
    > effort and expertise needed and the fact that they have to
    > keep lot of spare parts in stock. Also the risk of a professional
    > recovery outfit actually damaging your drive further, possibly
    > beyond recovery, is pretty low.
    >
    > Still, there is a price range and there are cheaper and more
    > expensive recovery outfits. There are also thos that will
    > only charge for a successful recovery, but they may not even
    > try more complicated cases or have to be more expensive in
    > order to stay economically viable.
    >


    No argument from me about the pricing of the recovery services, Arno, but
    just because the files are irreplaceable does not mean that she can afford
    to recover them. The data in question has no intrinsic value, it's photos.
    The photos cannot be replaced. She and her husband both lost their jobs when
    the factory shut down last month, so they are having to balance their
    priorities very carefully right now.




  4. Re: Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.

    The other Steve S is a troll too?

    Steve S (another one) wrote in news:8xgUj.21058$yD2.12825@text.news.virginmedia.c om
    > A friend's 6-month old notebook has failed. Needless to say, she has
    > irreplaceable files on the drive for which she has no backup. The drive
    > apparently won't spin up. She's had a estimated price for data recovery, but
    > this is totally outside her budget. It occurred to me that, assuming she
    > wants the notebook working again anyway, she could buy an identical
    > replacement drive and try swapping the controller boards over to see it the
    > fault was on the controller rather than the mech. Would this be a reasonable
    > thing to try?


    > Or do the controllers have stuff like calibration info in
    > flash that would render the idea non-feasible?


    >
    >
    > Steve S


  5. Re: Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.


    "Squeeze" wrote in message
    news:4821ccb9$0$13870$8f2e0ebb@news.shared-secrets.com...
    > The other Steve S is a troll too?
    >
    > Steve S (another one) wrote in
    > news:8xgUj.21058$yD2.12825@text.news.virginmedia.c om
    >> A friend's 6-month old notebook has failed. Needless to say, she has
    >> irreplaceable files on the drive for which she has no backup. The drive
    >> apparently won't spin up. She's had a estimated price for data recovery,
    >> but
    >> this is totally outside her budget. It occurred to me that, assuming she
    >> wants the notebook working again anyway, she could buy an identical
    >> replacement drive and try swapping the controller boards over to see it
    >> the
    >> fault was on the controller rather than the mech. Would this be a
    >> reasonable
    >> thing to try?

    >
    >> Or do the controllers have stuff like calibration info in
    >> flash that would render the idea non-feasible?

    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Steve S


    What?



  6. Re: Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.

    Previously "Steve S \(another one\)" wrote:

    > "Squeeze" wrote in message
    > news:4821ccb9$0$13870$8f2e0ebb@news.shared-secrets.com...
    >> The other Steve S is a troll too?
    >>
    >> Steve S (another one) wrote in
    >> news:8xgUj.21058$yD2.12825@text.news.virginmedia.c om
    >>> A friend's 6-month old notebook has failed. Needless to say, she has
    >>> irreplaceable files on the drive for which she has no backup. The drive
    >>> apparently won't spin up. She's had a estimated price for data recovery,
    >>> but
    >>> this is totally outside her budget. It occurred to me that, assuming she
    >>> wants the notebook working again anyway, she could buy an identical
    >>> replacement drive and try swapping the controller boards over to see it
    >>> the
    >>> fault was on the controller rather than the mech. Would this be a
    >>> reasonable
    >>> thing to try?

    >>
    >>> Or do the controllers have stuff like calibration info in
    >>> flash that would render the idea non-feasible?

    >>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Steve S


    > What?


    Ignore this guy. Everubody else does.

    Arno


  7. Re: Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.

    Steve S (another one) wrote:

    > A friend's 6-month old notebook has failed. Needless to say, she has irreplaceable files on the drive for which she
    > has no backup. The drive apparently won't spin up. She's had a estimated price for data recovery, but this is totally
    > outside her budget. It occurred to me that, assuming she wants the notebook working again anyway, she could buy an
    > identical replacement drive and try swapping the controller boards over to see it the fault was on the controller
    > rather than the mech. Would this be a reasonable thing to try?


    Yes, particularly if anything else is unaffordable.

    Worth checking cheaper recovery operations first tho like
    http://www.retrodata.co.uk/

    The other obvious option is to keep the dead drive until the cheaper recovery
    is affordable and trying a controller swap does reduce the chance of success.

    > Or do the controllers have stuff like calibration info in flash that would render the idea non-feasible?


    A few do, most dont. It isnt calibration data, but it does stop board swapping.



  8. Re: Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.

    In article <4821ccb9$0$13870$8f2e0ebb@news.shared-secrets.com>, Squeeze
    writes

    >The other Steve S is a troll too?


    Everybody's a troll in your eyes, Folkert. Why you even bother reading
    this group is beyond me.

    --
    (\__/) Bunny says NO to Windows Vista!
    (='.'=) http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut00...ista_cost.html
    (")_(") http://www.cypherpunks.to/~peter/vista.pdf



  9. Re: Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.

    Mike Tomlinson wrote
    > Squeeze wrote


    >> The other Steve S is a troll too?


    > Everybody's a troll in your eyes, Folkert.


    > Why you even bother reading this group is beyond me.


    Its gotta have something to wank over in its padded cell.



  10. Re: Replacing 2.5 in notebook drive controller.

    Mike Tomlinson wrote:
    >
    > In article <4821ccb9$0$13870$8f2e0ebb@news.shared-secrets.com>, Squeeze
    > writes
    >
    > >The other Steve S is a troll too?

    >
    > Everybody's a troll in your eyes, Folkert. Why you even bother reading
    > this group is beyond me.


    Hello, Mike:

    That's because Folkert Rienstra, himself, is just a trollin' fool, Dutch
    style! :-J

    > (\__/) Bunny says NO to Windows Vista!
    > (='.'=) http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut00...ista_cost.html
    > (")_(") http://www.cypherpunks.to/~peter/vista.pdf


    Cute critter. Does "Bunny" know any other tricks, incidentally?


    Cordially,
    John Turco

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