Backing Up - Storage

This is a discussion on Backing Up - Storage ; Hello. Further to a previous post, I have basically learnt a hard lesson about backing up my data, so now my hard drive is being dealt with my professionals, I'm looking to the future and how I will do my ...

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Thread: Backing Up

  1. Backing Up

    Hello. Further to a previous post, I have basically learnt a hard
    lesson about backing up my data, so now my hard drive is being dealt
    with my professionals, I'm looking to the future and how I will do my
    backing up.

    I want something that is convenient, but also offers good capacity as
    my work data continues to grow in size. To that end, I've been looking
    at either getting an external hard drive or looking for more "off-
    site" methods. It's probably overkill, but if something were to happen
    here at home it would be good to have a backup that is at a different
    location.

    To that end, finding a company that provides online storage space
    could be a good solution as I could access my data even when I'm away
    from home, it's "off-site" and it would be easy to automate a regular
    backup using an FTP server. Are their any companies out there people
    can recommend?

    I estimate my data requirements would be about 10GB for now, but I
    would like the option to allow this to grow. I would rather pay a flat
    fee and get lots of space, rather the paying by the gigabyte, as this
    just discourages making the backups in the first place.

    Kind Regards,

    Matt

  2. Re: Backing Up

    Previously Matt wrote:
    > Hello. Further to a previous post, I have basically learnt a hard
    > lesson about backing up my data, so now my hard drive is being dealt
    > with my professionals, I'm looking to the future and how I will do my
    > backing up.


    > I want something that is convenient, but also offers good capacity as
    > my work data continues to grow in size. To that end, I've been looking
    > at either getting an external hard drive or looking for more "off-
    > site" methods. It's probably overkill, but if something were to happen
    > here at home it would be good to have a backup that is at a different
    > location.


    > To that end, finding a company that provides online storage space
    > could be a good solution as I could access my data even when I'm away
    > from home, it's "off-site" and it would be easy to automate a regular
    > backup using an FTP server. Are their any companies out there people
    > can recommend?


    I looked at this a year ago a,d the prices I found were astronomical.
    I ended up getting a vserver, as it was cheaper that all the
    offsite offers. Not that I now really use it for backup.

    > I estimate my data requirements would be about 10GB for now, but I
    > would like the option to allow this to grow. I would rather pay a flat
    > fee and get lots of space, rather the paying by the gigabyte, as this
    > just discourages making the backups in the first place.


    For your backup size, possibly the best solution is to get at least
    two 40-80GB external 2.5" drives and backup to them alternatingly.
    Better use three disks in rotation.

    Arno

  3. Re: Backing Up

    Matt wrote

    > Hello. Further to a previous post, I have basically learnt a hard lesson
    > about backing up my data, so now my hard drive is being dealt with my
    > professionals, I'm looking to the future and how I will do my backing up.


    > I want something that is convenient, but also offers good
    > capacity as my work data continues to grow in size. To that
    > end, I've been looking at either getting an external hard drive


    Thats generally the best approach for most.

    > or looking for more "off-site" methods.


    How viable that is really depends on the volume of NEW data you
    produce and how feasible it is for the backup system to just copy
    the NEW data offsite, and whether you have broadband etc.

    > It's probably overkill, but if something were to happen here at home
    > it would be good to have a backup that is at a different location.


    Yes, you do need to protect against fire, flood, theft etc, even
    if thats done at a lower frequency than the normal backups.

    > To that end, finding a company that provides online storage
    > space could be a good solution as I could access my data
    > even when I'm away from home, it's "off-site" and it would
    > be easy to automate a regular backup using an FTP server.
    > Are their any companies out there people can recommend?


    You havent supplied enough data on the rate of
    new data and what you have broadband wise etc.

    > I estimate my data requirements would be about 10GB for now,


    Do you really have that much data that is irreplaceable ?

    > but I would like the option to allow this to grow. I would rather pay
    > a flat fee and get lots of space, rather the paying by the gigabyte,
    > as this just discourages making the backups in the first place.


    Its not likely to be anything like as cheap as a DVD
    burner and taking a DVD offsite occassionally.

    Has your financial situation changed enough to be able to afford anything better than DVDs ?



  4. Re: Backing Up

    "Matt" wrote in message
    news:3f83ffca-3642-4bb1-9a4c-8226fedad8cd@e23g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
    > Hello. Further to a previous post, I have basically learnt a hard
    > lesson about backing up my data, so now my hard drive is being dealt
    > with my professionals, I'm looking to the future and how I will do my
    > backing up.
    >
    > I want something that is convenient, but also offers good capacity as
    > my work data continues to grow in size. To that end, I've been looking
    > at either getting an external hard drive or looking for more "off-
    > site" methods. It's probably overkill, but if something were to happen
    > here at home it would be good to have a backup that is at a different
    > location.
    >
    > To that end, finding a company that provides online storage space
    > could be a good solution as I could access my data even when I'm away
    > from home, it's "off-site" and it would be easy to automate a regular
    > backup using an FTP server. Are their any companies out there people
    > can recommend?
    >
    > I estimate my data requirements would be about 10GB for now, but I
    > would like the option to allow this to grow. I would rather pay a flat
    > fee and get lots of space, rather the paying by the gigabyte, as this
    > just discourages making the backups in the first place.
    >
    > Kind Regards,
    >
    > Matt


    For convenience and to guard against data loss due to hard drive failure as
    you experienced, you need a frequent automated backup to either another
    drive within your PC or an atttached USB type hard drive or DVD writer. I
    like having a second internal hard drive with daily data backups scheduled.
    Then there's another protection that you want against data loss due to fire,
    flood etc. destroying your computer. That could be anything from a small
    portable 2.5" drive to even a flash drive - Newegg has 16 GB USB flash
    drives as low as $55. The latter you could keep around your neck on a
    lanyard so you'd always have your data with you. It would be up to you as to
    how often to back that up - maybe every week would suffice. IMHO, your risk
    of data loss is far greater from hard drive failure than from some external
    hazard.



  5. Re: Backing Up

    On Apr 1, 3:17*am, "iws" wrote:
    > "Matt" wrote in message
    >
    > news:3f83ffca-3642-4bb1-9a4c-8226fedad8cd@e23g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Hello. Further to a previous post, I have basically learnt a hard
    > > lesson about backing up my data, so now my hard drive is being dealt
    > > with my professionals, I'm looking to the future and how I will do my
    > > backing up.

    >
    > > I want something that is convenient, but also offers good capacity as
    > > my work data continues to grow in size. To that end, I've been looking
    > > at either getting an external hard drive or looking for more "off-
    > > site" methods. It's probably overkill, but if something were to happen
    > > here at home it would be good to have a backup that is at a different
    > > location.

    >
    > > To that end, finding a company that provides online storage space
    > > could be a good solution as I could access my data even when I'm away
    > > from home, it's "off-site" and it would be easy to automate a regular
    > > backup using an FTP server. Are their any companies out there people
    > > can recommend?

    >
    > > I estimate my data requirements would be about 10GB for now, but I
    > > would like the option to allow this to grow. I would rather pay a flat
    > > fee and get lots of space, rather the paying by the gigabyte, as this
    > > just discourages making the backups in the first place.

    >
    > > Kind Regards,

    >
    > > Matt

    >
    > For convenience and to guard against data loss due to hard drive failure as
    > you experienced, you need a frequent automated backup to either another
    > drive within your PC or an atttached USB type hard drive or DVD writer. I
    > like having a second internal hard drive with daily data backups scheduled..
    > Then there's another protection that you want against data loss due to fire,
    > flood etc. destroying your computer. That could be anything from a small
    > portable 2.5" drive to even a flash drive - Newegg has 16 GB USB flash
    > drives as low as $55. The latter you could keep around your neck on a
    > lanyard so you'd always have your data with you. It would be up to you as to
    > how often to back that up - maybe every week would suffice. IMHO, your risk
    > of data loss is far greater from hard drive failure than from some external
    > hazard.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Over broadband, I use www.carbonite.com for $50 a year, and it has
    unlimited backup capacity. It is automatic. All files are backed up
    either within minutes, or within 24 hours if they are being edited
    every 10 minutes. The worst one will loose is 24 hours work, and not
    4 years

    I've just renewed my contract after 12 months, as I am happy with it.
    I have used it to access my data from another computer, but this is
    not the easiest method.

    Norton 360 (an maybe other ones) have 10GB backup, but this is not as
    seamless as Carbonite.

    I think there are other packages, but have not investigated in the
    past 12 months.

    I also have local physical backup, and copying critical files to
    different PCs on my local network.


    Michael
    www.cnwrecovery.com

  6. Re: Backing Up

    Previously mscotgrove@aol.com wrote:
    > On Apr 1, 3:17*am, "iws" wrote:
    >> "Matt" wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:3f83ffca-3642-4bb1-9a4c-8226fedad8cd@e23g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > Hello. Further to a previous post, I have basically learnt a hard
    >> > lesson about backing up my data, so now my hard drive is being dealt
    >> > with my professionals, I'm looking to the future and how I will do my
    >> > backing up.

    >>
    >> > I want something that is convenient, but also offers good capacity as
    >> > my work data continues to grow in size. To that end, I've been looking
    >> > at either getting an external hard drive or looking for more "off-
    >> > site" methods. It's probably overkill, but if something were to happen
    >> > here at home it would be good to have a backup that is at a different
    >> > location.

    >>
    >> > To that end, finding a company that provides online storage space
    >> > could be a good solution as I could access my data even when I'm away
    >> > from home, it's "off-site" and it would be easy to automate a regular
    >> > backup using an FTP server. Are their any companies out there people
    >> > can recommend?

    >>
    >> > I estimate my data requirements would be about 10GB for now, but I
    >> > would like the option to allow this to grow. I would rather pay a flat
    >> > fee and get lots of space, rather the paying by the gigabyte, as this
    >> > just discourages making the backups in the first place.

    >>
    >> > Kind Regards,

    >>
    >> > Matt

    >>
    >> For convenience and to guard against data loss due to hard drive failure as
    >> you experienced, you need a frequent automated backup to either another
    >> drive within your PC or an atttached USB type hard drive or DVD writer. I
    >> like having a second internal hard drive with daily data backups scheduled.
    >> Then there's another protection that you want against data loss due to fire,
    >> flood etc. destroying your computer. That could be anything from a small
    >> portable 2.5" drive to even a flash drive - Newegg has 16 GB USB flash
    >> drives as low as $55. The latter you could keep around your neck on a
    >> lanyard so you'd always have your data with you. It would be up to you as to
    >> how often to back that up - maybe every week would suffice. IMHO, your risk
    >> of data loss is far greater from hard drive failure than from some external
    >> hazard.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -


    > Over broadband, I use www.carbonite.com for $50 a year, and it has
    > unlimited backup capacity. It is automatic. All files are backed up
    > either within minutes, or within 24 hours if they are being edited
    > every 10 minutes. The worst one will loose is 24 hours work, and not
    > 4 years


    > I've just renewed my contract after 12 months, as I am happy with it.
    > I have used it to access my data from another computer, but this is
    > not the easiest method.


    > Norton 360 (an maybe other ones) have 10GB backup, but this is not as
    > seamless as Carbonite.


    > I think there are other packages, but have not investigated in the
    > past 12 months.


    > I also have local physical backup, and copying critical files to
    > different PCs on my local network.


    If you trust Carbonite (and you have to, despite their claims
    of encryption, after all it is their software doing the encryption),
    and you only need backups under Windows, it looks like a good deal.

    Arno

  7. Re: Backing Up

    On Apr 1, 12:57*pm, Arno Wagner wrote:
    > Previously mscotgr...@aol.com wrote:
    > > On Apr 1, 3:17*am, "iws" wrote:
    > >> "Matt" wrote in message

    >
    > >>news:3f83ffca-3642-4bb1-9a4c-8226fedad8cd@e23g2000prf.googlegroups.com....

    >
    > >> > Hello. Further to a previous post, I have basically learnt a hard
    > >> > lesson about backing up my data, so now my hard drive is being dealt
    > >> > with my professionals, I'm looking to the future and how I will do my
    > >> > backing up.

    >
    > >> > I want something that is convenient, but also offers good capacity as
    > >> > my work data continues to grow in size. To that end, I've been looking
    > >> > at either getting an external hard drive or looking for more "off-
    > >> > site" methods. It's probably overkill, but if something were to happen
    > >> > here at home it would be good to have a backup that is at a different
    > >> > location.

    >
    > >> > To that end, finding a company that provides online storage space
    > >> > could be a good solution as I could access my data even when I'm away
    > >> > from home, it's "off-site" and it would be easy to automate a regular
    > >> > backup using an FTP server. Are their any companies out there people
    > >> > can recommend?

    >
    > >> > I estimate my data requirements would be about 10GB for now, but I
    > >> > would like the option to allow this to grow. I would rather pay a flat
    > >> > fee and get lots of space, rather the paying by the gigabyte, as this
    > >> > just discourages making the backups in the first place.

    >
    > >> > Kind Regards,

    >
    > >> > Matt

    >
    > >> For convenience and to guard against data loss due to hard drive failure as
    > >> you experienced, you need a frequent automated backup to either another
    > >> drive within your PC or an atttached USB type hard drive or DVD writer.I
    > >> like having a second internal hard drive with daily data backups scheduled.
    > >> Then there's another protection that you want against data loss due to fire,
    > >> flood etc. destroying your computer. That could be anything from a small
    > >> portable 2.5" drive to even a flash drive - Newegg has 16 GB USB flash
    > >> drives as low as $55. The latter you could keep around your neck on a
    > >> lanyard so you'd always have your data with you. It would be up to you as to
    > >> how often to back that up - maybe every week would suffice. IMHO, your risk
    > >> of data loss is far greater from hard drive failure than from some external
    > >> hazard.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    > > Over broadband, I usewww.carbonite.com* for $50 a year, and it has
    > > unlimited backup capacity. *It is automatic. *All files are backed up
    > > either within minutes, or within 24 hours if they are being edited
    > > every 10 minutes. *The worst one will loose is 24 hours work, and not
    > > 4 years
    > > I've just renewed my contract after 12 months, as I am happy with it.
    > > I have used it to access my data from another computer, but this is
    > > not the easiest method.
    > > Norton 360 (an maybe other ones) have 10GB backup, but this is not as
    > > seamless as Carbonite.
    > > I think there are other packages, but have not investigated in the
    > > past 12 months.
    > > I also have local physical backup, and copying critical files to
    > > different PCs on my local network.

    >
    > If you trust Carbonite (and you have to, despite their claims
    > of encryption, after all it is their software doing the encryption),
    > and you only need backups under Windows, it looks like a good deal.
    >
    > Arno- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    If you are really worried about security, you can encrypt your files
    first. It would be an extra stage, but if really worried/concerned/
    paronoid, very possible. Carbonite only backs up files / directories
    you want to to.

    Personally, I am the only person interested in my (excellent) holiday
    photos.

    Michael

  8. Re: Backing Up

    Previously mscotgrove@aol.com wrote:
    > On Apr 1, 12:57*pm, Arno Wagner wrote:
    >> Previously mscotgr...@aol.com wrote:
    >> > On Apr 1, 3:17*am, "iws" wrote:
    >> >> "Matt" wrote in message

    [...]
    >> If you trust Carbonite (and you have to, despite their claims
    >> of encryption, after all it is their software doing the encryption),
    >> and you only need backups under Windows, it looks like a good deal.
    >>
    >> Arno- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -


    > If you are really worried about security, you can encrypt your files
    > first. It would be an extra stage, but if really worried/concerned/
    > paronoid, very possible. Carbonite only backs up files / directories
    > you want to to.


    > Personally, I am the only person interested in my (excellent) holiday
    > photos.


    Well, for the really paranoid, this is again not enough, since you
    are running their software on your system. For ordinary paranoia
    levels, you approach should work well.

    Arno

  9. Re: Backing Up

    Arno Wagner wrote:
    > Previously mscotgrove@aol.com wrote:
    >> On Apr 1, 12:57 pm, Arno Wagner wrote:
    >>> Previously mscotgr...@aol.com wrote:
    >>>> On Apr 1, 3:17 am, "iws" wrote:
    >>>>> "Matt" wrote in message

    > [...]
    >>> If you trust Carbonite (and you have to, despite their claims
    >>> of encryption, after all it is their software doing the encryption),
    >>> and you only need backups under Windows, it looks like a good deal.
    >>>
    >>> Arno- Hide quoted text -
    >>>
    >>> - Show quoted text -

    >
    >> If you are really worried about security, you can encrypt your files
    >> first. It would be an extra stage, but if really worried/concerned/
    >> paronoid, very possible. Carbonite only backs up files / directories
    >> you want to to.

    >
    >> Personally, I am the only person interested in my (excellent) holiday
    >> photos.


    > Well, for the really paranoid, this is again not enough,
    > since you are running their software on your system.


    Its easy to ensure that it cant do anything that matters to the system its run on.

    > For ordinary paranoia levels, you approach should work well.


    And for the ultra paranoia too.



  10. Re: Backing Up

    Previously sam wrote:
    > Arno Wagner wrote:
    >> Previously mscotgrove@aol.com wrote:
    >>> On Apr 1, 12:57 pm, Arno Wagner wrote:
    >>>> Previously mscotgr...@aol.com wrote:
    >>>>> On Apr 1, 3:17 am, "iws" wrote:
    >>>>>> "Matt" wrote in message

    >> [...]
    >>>> If you trust Carbonite (and you have to, despite their claims
    >>>> of encryption, after all it is their software doing the encryption),
    >>>> and you only need backups under Windows, it looks like a good deal.
    >>>>
    >>>> Arno- Hide quoted text -
    >>>>
    >>>> - Show quoted text -

    >>
    >>> If you are really worried about security, you can encrypt your files
    >>> first. It would be an extra stage, but if really worried/concerned/
    >>> paronoid, very possible. Carbonite only backs up files / directories
    >>> you want to to.

    >>
    >>> Personally, I am the only person interested in my (excellent) holiday
    >>> photos.


    >> Well, for the really paranoid, this is again not enough,
    >> since you are running their software on your system.


    > Its easy to ensure that it cant do anything that matters to the
    > system its run on.


    I don't think so. Local attacks that allow privilege elevation
    are notoriously easy on Windows. And even if you put it into
    a virtual machine, there have been vulnerabilities, that
    allowed breaking out.

    >> For ordinary paranoia levels, you approach should work well.


    > And for the ultra paranoia too.


    Definitely not.

    Arno


  11. Re: Backing Up

    Arno Wagner wrote:
    > Previously sam wrote:
    >> Arno Wagner wrote:
    >>> Previously mscotgrove@aol.com wrote:
    >>>> On Apr 1, 12:57 pm, Arno Wagner wrote:
    >>>>> Previously mscotgr...@aol.com wrote:
    >>>>>> On Apr 1, 3:17 am, "iws" wrote:
    >>>>>>> "Matt" wrote in message
    >>> [...]
    >>>>> If you trust Carbonite (and you have to, despite their claims
    >>>>> of encryption, after all it is their software doing the
    >>>>> encryption), and you only need backups under Windows, it looks
    >>>>> like a good deal.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Arno- Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>
    >>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>
    >>>> If you are really worried about security, you can encrypt your
    >>>> files first. It would be an extra stage, but if really
    >>>> worried/concerned/ paronoid, very possible. Carbonite only backs
    >>>> up files / directories you want to to.
    >>>
    >>>> Personally, I am the only person interested in my (excellent)
    >>>> holiday photos.

    >
    >>> Well, for the really paranoid, this is again not enough,
    >>> since you are running their software on your system.

    >
    >> Its easy to ensure that it cant do anything that matters to the
    >> system its run on.


    > I don't think so.


    You're wrong.

    > Local attacks that allow privilege elevation are notoriously easy on Windows.


    And its easy to check whether that is happening, and easy to
    ensure that they cant do any damage to the system that its run on.

    > And even if you put it into a virtual machine, there
    > have been vulnerabilities, that allowed breaking out.


    And its easy to check whether that is happening, and easy to
    ensure that they cant do any damage to the system that its run on.

    >>> For ordinary paranoia levels, you approach should work well.


    >> And for the ultra paranoia too.


    > Definitely not.


    Fraid so.



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