World disk storage production in 1983 - Storage

This is a discussion on World disk storage production in 1983 - Storage ; A recent document on bitsavers http://bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/competi...view_Mar82.pdf has an estimate - in 1983 - of worldwide "large disk" production (including IBM) at about 60,000 units. (I get this by adding the "OEM numbers" to the "IBM numbers"). Capacity seems to be ...

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  1. World disk storage production in 1983

    A recent document on bitsavers

    http://bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/competi...view_Mar82.pdf

    has an estimate - in 1983 - of worldwide "large disk" production
    (including IBM) at about 60,000 units. (I get this by adding the "OEM
    numbers" to the "IBM numbers").

    Capacity seems to be in the 100Mbyte to 300-600 Mbyte range, with the
    vast majority of shipments in the lower end of the range.

    Many of these are removable pack drives, but not all.

    If I take 60,000 units times an average storage of 200 Mbytes each I
    get a net drive production, worldwide, of 12 terabytes for the year
    1983.

    I can go to CompUSA at the end of the street today and buy that much
    storage in about 5 minutes without even maxing out my credit card.

    Of course a few years after 1983, Fujitsu was was probably selling
    tens of thousands of their Fuji Eagle every year... probably 100K
    units total over product life, just based on my estimation.

    Tim.

  2. Re: World disk storage production in 1983

    In article <15f356a4-6c4e-4cb4-8669-798c541ed1e8@n36g2000hse.googlegroups.com>,
    Tim Shoppa wrote:
    >A recent document on bitsavers
    >
    > http://bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/competi...view_Mar82.pdf
    >
    >has an estimate - in 1983 - of worldwide "large disk" production
    >(including IBM) at about 60,000 units. (I get this by adding the "OEM
    >numbers" to the "IBM numbers").
    >
    >Capacity seems to be in the 100Mbyte to 300-600 Mbyte range, with the
    >vast majority of shipments in the lower end of the range.
    >
    >Many of these are removable pack drives, but not all.
    >
    >If I take 60,000 units times an average storage of 200 Mbytes each I
    >get a net drive production, worldwide, of 12 terabytes for the year
    >1983.
    >
    >I can go to CompUSA at the end of the street today and buy that much
    >storage in about 5 minutes without even maxing out my credit card.
    >
    >Of course a few years after 1983, Fujitsu was was probably selling
    >tens of thousands of their Fuji Eagle every year... probably 100K
    >units total over product life, just based on my estimation.



    Not long after 1983 some of us bought hard disks for an x86 PC. My
    first was from DEC for a Rainbow. It was 5MB and had seek time and
    transfer rate not that much better than the first generation CD
    readers.

    ISTR it cost about $1,000



    --
    Al Dykes
    News is something someone wants to suppress, everything else is advertising.
    - Lord Northcliffe, publisher of the Daily Mail


  3. Re: World disk storage production in 1983

    On Mar 4, 2:19*pm, ady...@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:
    > In article <15f356a4-6c4e-4cb4-8669-798c541ed...@n36g2000hse.googlegroups.com>,
    > Tim Shoppa * wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >A recent document on bitsavers

    >
    > > *http://bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/competi...ering_Strategy....

    >
    > >has an estimate - in 1983 - of worldwide "large disk" production
    > >(including IBM) at about 60,000 units. (I get this by adding the "OEM
    > >numbers" to the "IBM numbers").

    >
    > >Capacity seems to be in the 100Mbyte to 300-600 Mbyte range, with the
    > >vast majority of shipments in the lower end of the range.

    >
    > >Many of these are removable pack drives, but not all.

    >
    > >If I take 60,000 units times an average storage of 200 Mbytes each I
    > >get a net drive production, worldwide, of 12 terabytes for the year
    > >1983.

    >
    > >I can go to CompUSA at the end of the street today and buy that much
    > >storage in about 5 minutes without even maxing out my credit card.

    >
    > >Of course a few years after 1983, Fujitsu was was probably selling
    > >tens of thousands of their Fuji Eagle every year... probably 100K
    > >units total over product life, just based on my estimation.

    >
    > Not long after 1983 some of us bought hard disks for an x86 PC. *My
    > first was from DEC for a Rainbow. It was 5MB and had seek time and
    > transfer rate not that much better than the first generation CD
    > readers.
    >
    > ISTR it cost about $1,000


    Certainly the ST506-style drives really took off in raw number of
    units manufactured right about that time. But even at 100K units a
    year, 100K times 5 Mybtes is "only" 500Gbytes.

    I think that 5 Mbytes/drive was in the noise as far as the large
    systems that particular chart was looking at. Other charts in that
    same document trace through smaller drives (e.g. RK05/RX02, later RL02/
    RC25, and later the ST506-era drives) I don't understand all the
    charts at the end but wow, that RC25/Aztec really sticks out like a
    sore thumb. It's been so many years since I saw a working RC25... but
    I know of RK05's/RX02's still in use.

    Tim.

  4. Re: World disk storage production in 1983

    In article <15f356a4-6c4e-4cb4-8669-798c541ed1e8@n36g2000hse.googlegroups.com> Tim Shoppa writes:
    >A recent document on bitsavers
    >
    > http://bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/competi...view_Mar82.pdf
    >
    >has an estimate - in 1983 - of worldwide "large disk" production
    >(including IBM) at about 60,000 units. (I get this by adding the "OEM
    >numbers" to the "IBM numbers").
    >
    >Capacity seems to be in the 100Mbyte to 300-600 Mbyte range, with the
    >vast majority of shipments in the lower end of the range.
    >
    >Many of these are removable pack drives, but not all.
    >
    >If I take 60,000 units times an average storage of 200 Mbytes each I
    >get a net drive production, worldwide, of 12 terabytes for the year
    >1983.
    >
    >I can go to CompUSA at the end of the street today and buy that much
    >storage in about 5 minutes without even maxing out my credit card.
    >


    No you can't! CompUSA is gone. ;-) Have you been to our lovely
    new MEI MicroCenter yet?

    Bill


  5. Re: World disk storage production in 1983

    In comp.arch.storage Tim Shoppa wrote:
    > A recent document on bitsavers
    >
    > http://bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/competi...view_Mar82.pdf
    >
    > has an estimate - in 1983 - of worldwide "large disk" production
    > (including IBM) at about 60,000 units. (I get this by adding the "OEM
    > numbers" to the "IBM numbers").
    >
    > Capacity seems to be in the 100Mbyte to 300-600 Mbyte range, with the
    > vast majority of shipments in the lower end of the range.
    >
    > Many of these are removable pack drives, but not all.
    >
    > If I take 60,000 units times an average storage of 200 Mbytes each I
    > get a net drive production, worldwide, of 12 terabytes for the year
    > 1983.
    >
    > I can go to CompUSA at the end of the street today and buy that much
    > storage in about 5 minutes without even maxing out my credit card.
    >
    > Of course a few years after 1983, Fujitsu was was probably selling
    > tens of thousands of their Fuji Eagle every year... probably 100K
    > units total over product life, just based on my estimation.
    >
    > Tim.


    Were these Fujitsu units the ones with two rows of heads on the actuator
    where a full seek was really two half seek across the two heads?

  6. Re: World disk storage production in 1983

    In article , presence@MUNGEpanix.com
    says...
    >
    >In comp.arch.storage Tim Shoppa wrote:
    >> A recent document on bitsavers
    >>
    >>

    http://bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/competi...g_Strategy_Rev
    iew_Mar82.pdf
    >>
    >> has an estimate - in 1983 - of worldwide "large disk" production
    >> (including IBM) at about 60,000 units. (I get this by adding the "OEM
    >> numbers" to the "IBM numbers").
    >>
    >> Capacity seems to be in the 100Mbyte to 300-600 Mbyte range, with the
    >> vast majority of shipments in the lower end of the range.
    >>
    >> Many of these are removable pack drives, but not all.
    >>
    >> If I take 60,000 units times an average storage of 200 Mbytes each I
    >> get a net drive production, worldwide, of 12 terabytes for the year
    >> 1983.
    >>
    >> I can go to CompUSA at the end of the street today and buy that much
    >> storage in about 5 minutes without even maxing out my credit card.
    >>
    >> Of course a few years after 1983, Fujitsu was was probably selling
    >> tens of thousands of their Fuji Eagle every year... probably 100K
    >> units total over product life, just based on my estimation.
    >>
    >> Tim.

    >
    >Were these Fujitsu units the ones with two rows of heads on the actuator
    >where a full seek was really two half seek across the two heads?



    I know we had 800 MByte drives on our Cyber 750 circa 1982. However,
    I think most drives were shipped to mini-computer installations, and
    those drives were anywhere from 20-200 Mbyte.

    This is similar to the situation today, where big data base installations
    have racks and racks of fiber channel drives, but most drives today are
    the cheapo SATA drives.

    - Tim


  7. Re: World disk storage production in 1983

    In comp.arch.storage Tim McCaffrey wrote:
    > In article , presence@MUNGEpanix.com
    > says...
    >>
    >>In comp.arch.storage Tim Shoppa wrote:
    >>> A recent document on bitsavers
    >>>
    >>>

    > http://bitsavers.org/pdf/dec/competi...g_Strategy_Rev
    > iew_Mar82.pdf
    >>>
    >>> has an estimate - in 1983 - of worldwide "large disk" production
    >>> (including IBM) at about 60,000 units. (I get this by adding the "OEM
    >>> numbers" to the "IBM numbers").
    >>>
    >>> Capacity seems to be in the 100Mbyte to 300-600 Mbyte range, with the
    >>> vast majority of shipments in the lower end of the range.
    >>>
    >>> Many of these are removable pack drives, but not all.
    >>>
    >>> If I take 60,000 units times an average storage of 200 Mbytes each I
    >>> get a net drive production, worldwide, of 12 terabytes for the year
    >>> 1983.
    >>>
    >>> I can go to CompUSA at the end of the street today and buy that much
    >>> storage in about 5 minutes without even maxing out my credit card.
    >>>
    >>> Of course a few years after 1983, Fujitsu was was probably selling
    >>> tens of thousands of their Fuji Eagle every year... probably 100K
    >>> units total over product life, just based on my estimation.
    >>>
    >>> Tim.

    >>
    >>Were these Fujitsu units the ones with two rows of heads on the actuator
    >>where a full seek was really two half seek across the two heads?

    >
    >
    > I know we had 800 MByte drives on our Cyber 750 circa 1982. However,
    > I think most drives were shipped to mini-computer installations, and
    > those drives were anywhere from 20-200 Mbyte.


    Any exciting cyber 750 stories? I still want one of those control data lab
    coats.



  8. Re: World disk storage production in 1983

    In article , presence@MUNGEpanix.com says...

    >Any exciting cyber 750 stories? I still want one of those control data lab
    >coats.
    >
    >


    Exciting? Hmmm...

    Well, there are the usual stories about printers catching on fire, card
    readers in make-a-mess mode, and disk drives walking across the floor, but I
    wasn't directly involved in those.

    I guess the most exciting thing I was involved with is I found a system bug,
    crashed the system three times in a row, and caused 30 minutes of hair pulling
    on the part of operations and the systems programming dept.

    (I was allowed to call myself systems programmer after that, since only a
    systems programmer would crash the system three times before deciding it must
    be him doing the deed).

    I worked in the User Information Center as a "Consultant", which meant that
    non undergraduate student users could come ask us questions about the system,
    a large portion of which were "why doesn't my program work?". I got damn good
    at debugging large, complex Fortran programs (if they brought the dump print
    out). It was fun to watch somebody's face when they brought in a three inch
    thick listing of a program they have been trying to debug for a couple of
    weeks without success, and then I found their bug in less than 15 minutes.

    I even got to teach boolean logic to a CS professor once.

    - Tim



  9. Re: World disk storage production in 1983

    In comp.arch.storage Tim McCaffrey wrote:
    > In article , presence@MUNGEpanix.com says...
    >
    >>Any exciting cyber 750 stories? I still want one of those control data lab
    >>coats.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Exciting? Hmmm...
    >
    > Well, there are the usual stories about printers catching on fire, card
    > readers in make-a-mess mode, and disk drives walking across the floor, but I
    > wasn't directly involved in those.
    >
    > I guess the most exciting thing I was involved with is I found a system bug,
    > crashed the system three times in a row, and caused 30 minutes of hair pulling
    > on the part of operations and the systems programming dept.
    >
    > (I was allowed to call myself systems programmer after that, since only a
    > systems programmer would crash the system three times before deciding it must
    > be him doing the deed).
    >
    > I worked in the User Information Center as a "Consultant", which meant that
    > non undergraduate student users could come ask us questions about the system,
    > a large portion of which were "why doesn't my program work?". I got damn good
    > at debugging large, complex Fortran programs (if they brought the dump print
    > out). It was fun to watch somebody's face when they brought in a three inch
    > thick listing of a program they have been trying to debug for a couple of
    > weeks without success, and then I found their bug in less than 15 minutes.
    >
    > I even got to teach boolean logic to a CS professor once.
    >
    > - Tim
    >
    >


    I like the fast debugging part.

    I asked a computer teacher why they were a computer teacher and the answer
    was when they were in college only the computer rooms were air conditioned
    so they took computer classes, like them and stuck with it.



  10. Re: World disk storage production in 1983

    In article ,
    Cydrome Leader wrote:
    >In comp.arch.storage Tim McCaffrey wrote:
    >> In article , presence@MUNGEpanix.com

    says...
    >>
    >>>Any exciting cyber 750 stories? I still want one of those control data lab
    >>>coats.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Exciting? Hmmm...
    >>
    >> Well, there are the usual stories about printers catching on fire, card
    >> readers in make-a-mess mode, and disk drives walking across the floor, but

    I
    >> wasn't directly involved in those.
    >>
    >> I guess the most exciting thing I was involved with is I found a system

    bug,
    >> crashed the system three times in a row, and caused 30 minutes of hair

    pulling
    >> on the part of operations and the systems programming dept.
    >>
    >> (I was allowed to call myself systems programmer after that, since only a
    >> systems programmer would crash the system three times before deciding it

    must
    >> be him doing the deed).
    >>
    >> I worked in the User Information Center as a "Consultant", which meant that
    >> non undergraduate student users could come ask us questions about the

    system,
    >> a large portion of which were "why doesn't my program work?". I got damn

    good
    >> at debugging large, complex Fortran programs (if they brought the dump

    print
    >> out). It was fun to watch somebody's face when they brought in a three

    inch
    >> thick listing of a program they have been trying to debug for a couple of
    >> weeks without success, and then I found their bug in less than 15 minutes.
    >>
    >> I even got to teach boolean logic to a CS professor once.
    >>
    >> - Tim
    >>
    >>

    >
    >I like the fast debugging part.
    >
    >I asked a computer teacher why they were a computer teacher and the answer
    >was when they were in college only the computer rooms were air conditioned
    >so they took computer classes, like them and stuck with it.


    The other area that was air conditioned was animals. So you got
    to choose between shoveling **** and guts or bits. Since computers
    obeyed everything you told them to do, wrestling with computers
    was much easier and less risky than animals.

    /BAH

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