cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs - Storage

This is a discussion on cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs - Storage ; Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro" ( http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/ ) and the "eSATA External Hard Drive" ( http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/ ). Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't result in information of ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 47

Thread: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

  1. cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).

    Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    result in information of any certitude.

    Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    a cooling fan and and how they get their power?

    *TimDaniels*



  2. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs


    "Timothy Daniels" wrote in message
    news:47c5cad5$0$24122$4c368faf@roadrunner.com...
    > Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    > interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    > (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    > and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    > (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >
    > Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    > result in information of any certitude.
    >
    > Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    > a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >
    > *TimDaniels*
    >

    Look here at pics and read specifications and customer reviews--and
    other models of Seagate on N'egg's same site. BTW: pic show a wall-plugged
    power source. HTH, s
    >> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822148237 <<




  3. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs


    "sdlomi2" wrote:
    >
    > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >> result in information of any certitude.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >>
    >> *TimDaniels*
    >>

    > Look here at pics and read specifications and customer reviews--and other
    > models of Seagate on N'egg's same site. BTW: pic show a wall-plugged power
    > source. HTH, s
    >>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822148237 <<

    >
    >


    Thanks. The photo shows a power brick for the "Free Agent Pro",
    but no info on method of cooling. I suspect that it's only convection.
    And similar info on the "eSATA External Hard Drive" line is harder
    to come by.

    *TimDaniels*



  4. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Hi!

    > Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    > a cooling fan and and how they get their power?


    Well, it looks like a 3.5" drive is inside, and I don't think there is
    a single USB port out there capable of supplying enough power to run a
    desktop drive. Even if there was, you'd still need to get twelve
    volts, which would require some sort of DC-DC converter and the
    associated energy usage/loss that would bring.

    I've never seen one of these close up, but I don't believe there is a
    fan inside. At least I've never heard one--and previous generation
    Seagate external hard drives don't have one either.

    William

  5. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs


    "Timothy Daniels" wrote in message
    news:47c5e40c$0$24125$4c368faf@roadrunner.com...
    >
    > "sdlomi2" wrote:
    >>
    >> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >>> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >>> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >>> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >>>
    >>> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >>> result in information of any certitude.
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >>> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >>>
    >>> *TimDaniels*
    >>>

    >> Look here at pics and read specifications and customer reviews--and
    >> other models of Seagate on N'egg's same site. BTW: pic show a
    >> wall-plugged power source. HTH, s
    >>>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822148237 <<

    >>
    >>

    >
    > Thanks. The photo shows a power brick for the "Free Agent Pro",
    > but no info on method of cooling. I suspect that it's only convection.
    > And similar info on the "eSATA External Hard Drive" line is harder
    > to come by.
    >
    > *TimDaniels*
    >



    Tim -

    The (desktop) Seagate FreeAgent does not have any active cooling, though it
    is AC powered. I know the FreeAgentPro is an upgrade model that comes not
    only eSATA capable, but also with a software bundle that isn't on the
    standard model.

    That said, it looks remarkably the same as the entry level model otherwise.

    I have no idea about any (specifically) eSATA Seagate solutions as I haven't
    seen nor used them.


    Stew



  6. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage Timothy Daniels wrote:
    > Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    > interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    > (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    > and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    > (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).


    > Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    > result in information of any certitude.


    > Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    > a cooling fan and and how they get their power?


    > *TimDaniels*


    It will have some brick-type PSU. USB ports can deliver up to 2.5W
    each (high-power ports), while even lean 3.5" HDDs go up to 15W
    or so on start-up. So unless they tie 8 high-power ports together
    (add two for the DC-DC converters) and put in 5-to-12V step up
    converters for 20W (expensive) this is a complete no-go. Technically
    feasible though, but unworkable in practice.

    As to cooling, unless they explicitely claim a fan, it is safe to
    assume there is none. At least eSATA lets you monitor the temperature,
    but I think currently you cannot trust any pre-packaged drive at
    all and external an DIY enclosure only if somebody has reviewed its
    thermal characteristics.

    My current approach is to be prepared to throw it away
    if it does not work out. A sad state of affairs, I know.

    Arno



  7. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    "S.Lewis" wrote:
    > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >>
    >> "sdlomi2" wrote:
    >>>
    >>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >>>> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >>>> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >>>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >>>> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >>>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >>>>
    >>>> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >>>> result in information of any certitude.
    >>>>
    >>>> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >>>> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >>>>
    >>>> *TimDaniels*
    >>>>
    >>> Look here at pics and read specifications and customer reviews--and other
    >>> models of Seagate on N'egg's same site. BTW: pic show a wall-plugged power
    >>> source. HTH, s
    >>>>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822148237 <<
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Thanks. The photo shows a power brick for the "Free Agent Pro",
    >> but no info on method of cooling. I suspect that it's only convection.
    >> And similar info on the "eSATA External Hard Drive" line is harder
    >> to come by.
    >>
    >> *TimDaniels*
    >>

    >
    >
    > Tim -
    >
    > The (desktop) Seagate FreeAgent does not have any active cooling, though it is
    > AC powered. I know the FreeAgentPro is an upgrade model that comes not only
    > eSATA capable, but also with a software bundle that isn't on the standard
    > model.
    >
    > That said, it looks remarkably the same as the entry level model otherwise.
    >
    > I have no idea about any (specifically) eSATA Seagate solutions as I haven't
    > seen nor used them.
    >
    >
    > Stew



    Thanks. I guess I'll have to brew up an external eSATA HD
    using a Kingwin enclosure. I know those things have a cooling
    fan.

    *TimDaniels*



  8. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    wrote:
    > Hi!
    >
    >> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?

    >
    > Well, it looks like a 3.5" drive is inside, and I don't think there is
    > a single USB port out there capable of supplying enough power to run a
    > desktop drive. Even if there was, you'd still need to get twelve
    > volts, which would require some sort of DC-DC converter and the
    > associated energy usage/loss that would bring.
    >
    > I've never seen one of these close up, but I don't believe there is a
    > fan inside. At least I've never heard one--and previous generation
    > Seagate external hard drives don't have one either.
    >
    > William


    I've been noticing that cooling fans are hard to find in
    "external HDs". Maybe it's the noise factor?

    *TimDaniels*



  9. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    "Arno Wagner" wrote:
    > Timothy Daniels wrote:
    >> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).

    >
    >> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >> result in information of any certitude.

    >
    >> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?

    >
    >> *TimDaniels*

    >
    > It will have some brick-type PSU. USB ports can deliver up to 2.5W
    > each (high-power ports), while even lean 3.5" HDDs go up to 15W
    > or so on start-up. So unless they tie 8 high-power ports together
    > (add two for the DC-DC converters) and put in 5-to-12V step up
    > converters for 20W (expensive) this is a complete no-go. Technically
    > feasible though, but unworkable in practice.
    >
    > As to cooling, unless they explicitely claim a fan, it is safe to
    > assume there is none. At least eSATA lets you monitor the temperature,
    > but I think currently you cannot trust any pre-packaged drive at
    > all and external an DIY enclosure only if somebody has reviewed its
    > thermal characteristics.
    >
    > My current approach is to be prepared to throw it away
    > if it does not work out. A sad state of affairs, I know.
    >
    > Arno
    >
    >


    I've had some very good luck with HD longevity, and I think it
    has to do with the generous airflow which keeps the HDs cool.
    Since the external HD doesn't have to be on all the time, I think
    I'll take a chance with a Kingwin eSATA box that does have a
    cooling fan. (They only cost about $30 online.) The fan sits flat
    with the circuit card on the HD, just like on my Kingwin slide-out
    HD tray, and that HD never even gets up to body temp.

    *TimDaniels*



  10. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    You could also try the Antec MX-1 enclosure. It has a fan that is completely
    silemt and supports drives up to 750GB using esata or usb.
    "Timothy Daniels" wrote in message
    news:47c65cb2$0$6136$4c368faf@roadrunner.com...
    > "S.Lewis" wrote:
    >> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >>>
    >>> "sdlomi2" wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >>>>> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >>>>> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >>>>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >>>>> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >>>>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >>>>> result in information of any certitude.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >>>>> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> *TimDaniels*
    >>>>>
    >>>> Look here at pics and read specifications and customer reviews--and
    >>>> other models of Seagate on N'egg's same site. BTW: pic show a
    >>>> wall-plugged power source. HTH, s
    >>>>>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822148237 <<
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks. The photo shows a power brick for the "Free Agent Pro",
    >>> but no info on method of cooling. I suspect that it's only convection.
    >>> And similar info on the "eSATA External Hard Drive" line is harder
    >>> to come by.
    >>>
    >>> *TimDaniels*
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Tim -
    >>
    >> The (desktop) Seagate FreeAgent does not have any active cooling, though
    >> it is AC powered. I know the FreeAgentPro is an upgrade model that comes
    >> not only eSATA capable, but also with a software bundle that isn't on the
    >> standard model.
    >>
    >> That said, it looks remarkably the same as the entry level model
    >> otherwise.
    >>
    >> I have no idea about any (specifically) eSATA Seagate solutions as I
    >> haven't seen nor used them.
    >>
    >>
    >> Stew

    >
    >
    > Thanks. I guess I'll have to brew up an external eSATA HD
    > using a Kingwin enclosure. I know those things have a cooling
    > fan.
    >
    > *TimDaniels*
    >



  11. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    FWIW, I have yet to see an external drive enclosure for 2.5" notebook drives
    with a cooling fan... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 23:04:30 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
    wrote:

    >"S.Lewis" wrote:
    >> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >>>
    >>> "sdlomi2" wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >>>>> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >>>>> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >>>>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >>>>> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >>>>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >>>>> result in information of any certitude.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >>>>> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> *TimDaniels*
    >>>>>
    >>>> Look here at pics and read specifications and customer reviews--and other
    >>>> models of Seagate on N'egg's same site. BTW: pic show a wall-plugged power
    >>>> source. HTH, s
    >>>>>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822148237 <<
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks. The photo shows a power brick for the "Free Agent Pro",
    >>> but no info on method of cooling. I suspect that it's only convection.
    >>> And similar info on the "eSATA External Hard Drive" line is harder
    >>> to come by.
    >>>
    >>> *TimDaniels*
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Tim -
    >>
    >> The (desktop) Seagate FreeAgent does not have any active cooling, though it is
    >> AC powered. I know the FreeAgentPro is an upgrade model that comes not only
    >> eSATA capable, but also with a software bundle that isn't on the standard
    >> model.
    >>
    >> That said, it looks remarkably the same as the entry level model otherwise.
    >>
    >> I have no idea about any (specifically) eSATA Seagate solutions as I haven't
    >> seen nor used them.
    >>
    >>
    >> Stew

    >
    >
    > Thanks. I guess I'll have to brew up an external eSATA HD
    >using a Kingwin enclosure. I know those things have a cooling
    >fan.
    >
    >*TimDaniels*
    >


  12. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Hi!

    > I've been noticing that cooling fans are hard
    > to find in "external HDs". Maybe it's the
    > noise factor?


    It could very well be--quiet is definitely in, whether it's good for
    the electronics or not. I also think the problem of finding a
    *reliable* fan to put in such things could be a factor.

    If Seagate's offerings aren't satisfactory, I would suggest the
    possibility of putting your own together. Buy the drive you want, test
    it out and then put it in the enclosure of your choosing. Below are
    two that I've used and would recommend:

    I've put hard drives in a Coolmax CD-311 enclosure and been very happy
    with the results. This enclosure doesn't have a fan, but it is made of
    solid aluminum, which is a great heatsink. The drive fits snugly
    against the sides of the case, so it can take advantage of the
    additional cooling. The really nice thing about this enclosure is the
    inclusion of USB 2.0, Firewire 400 (iffy with a PATA drive installed
    under Windows, fine at all times on my Macs and seemingly OK under
    Windows with a SATA drive inside), and SATA connectors. They even give
    you a nice slightly magnetized screwdriver to put the thing
    together...not a big thing, but it's a decent quality tool that you
    can keep afterwards.

    If you need a fan (and don't want a power brick), I would highly
    recommend the Bytecc ME-340 enclosure. While it is a 5.25" device, it
    comes with a 3.5" device adapter, has a fan and takes a regular
    computer power plug.

    These can also be found under other brands. Vantec sells a version of
    the Bytecc product that is USB only but otherwise identical.

    William

  13. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Timothy Daniels wrote:
    > Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    > interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    > (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    > and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    > (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >
    > Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    > result in information of any certitude.
    >
    > Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    > a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >
    > *TimDaniels*
    >
    >

    I have one of
    http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ata_hard_drive
    and it's used as a media centre store so it's on 24/7 with no problems
    at all.

    The power is from a small-ish block type device.

  14. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Hi!

    > FWIW, I have yet to see an external drive enclosure
    > for 2.5" notebook drives with a cooling
    > fan... Ben Myers


    How about a heatsink? Other World Computing sells some PATA and SATA
    enclosures for 2.5" drives that are neat looking (!!) and completely
    bus powered. I think they're somewhat overpriced, so I've purchased
    mine secondhand or from their clearance/closeout section.

    I like the clear case because I can stick a "reward if found, please
    contact me" notice on top of the drive and have it visible through the
    casing. The notice also can't be removed without tools.

    The PATA ones don't have a heatsink (although it doesn't seem to
    matter--I have a 7200RPM PATA Hitachi drive running around the clock
    in one with no problems over the past few months).

    The SATA ones have a heatsink in their "belly" that grows quite warm
    when the drive is on:

    http://eshop.macsales.com/images/Ite...00u2bottom.jpg

    William

  15. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    wm_walsh@hotmail.com wrote:
    > Hi!
    >
    >> FWIW, I have yet to see an external drive enclosure
    >> for 2.5" notebook drives with a cooling
    >> fan... Ben Myers

    >
    > How about a heatsink? Other World Computing sells some PATA and SATA
    > enclosures for 2.5" drives that are neat looking (!!) and completely
    > bus powered. I think they're somewhat overpriced, so I've purchased
    > mine secondhand or from their clearance/closeout section.
    >
    > I like the clear case because I can stick a "reward if found, please
    > contact me" notice on top of the drive and have it visible through the
    > casing. The notice also can't be removed without tools.
    >
    > The PATA ones don't have a heatsink (although it doesn't seem to
    > matter--I have a 7200RPM PATA Hitachi drive running around the clock
    > in one with no problems over the past few months).
    >
    > The SATA ones have a heatsink in their "belly" that grows quite warm
    > when the drive is on:
    >
    > http://eshop.macsales.com/images/Ite...00u2bottom.jpg
    >
    > William


    Some of the current 2.5" drives, draw less than 2.5W total.
    And that allows them to be bus powered via the USB bus.
    The average power is lower than that, which is why they
    don't need a lot of cooling ability.

    Some of my 3.5" drives, draw 12V @ 0.6A and 5V @ 1A for the motor
    and controller. That is a larger load, and too much for USB bus
    powering. The enclosure needs a power source. It could also use
    some cooling, as even with conduction cooling, parts of the drive
    may not be making contact with the exterior casing.

    When one of the pre-packaged externals exhibited a high failure
    rate, the manufacturer "fixed" it, by setting a short "spindown"
    time, so the drive would spend more time with the motor off.
    That reduces power when the drive is not being used, but does
    not help in the case where a user is doing a file by file backup
    over a period of several hours.

    Based on the above, I would have fewer reservations using a 2.5" drive,
    as at least I could be assured it wouldn't overheat.

    For 3.5" drives, I have to insist on fan cooling, even if I have to
    add it myself.

    I've even seen external enclosures with a fan, but no air intake on
    the casing! For that one, I had to drill a "Swiss cheese" pattern
    into the bottom front of the enclosure.

    For reliability info, all you have to do, is read the customer
    reviews on Newegg, to get some idea whether 3.5" fanless wonders
    are a good investment.

    Maybe the safest thing, is just to leave the raw mechanism lying
    on the table :-) That cannot be any worse than "cooking" it :-)

    Kits like this, make it easy to leave the raw drive on the table.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16812186036

    Paul

  16. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs


    "harikeo" replied:
    > Timothy Daniels wrote:
    >> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >> result in information of any certitude.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >>
    >> *TimDaniels*

    > I have one of
    > http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ata_hard_drive
    > and it's used as a media centre store so it's on 24/7 with no problems at all.
    >
    > The power is from a small-ish block type device.


    Thanks for clearing up the source of power. Both the product
    photos and the product specs don't show or mentiona a power supply,
    only a "power cord". I also get that it runs OK, but does it use
    convection for cooling or does it have an internal fan?

    *TimDaniels*



  17. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    I have a client for whom I assembled and delivered 2.5" external PATA drives,
    and my predecessor (who retired) delivered a number of them too. They are used
    primarily for backup, so they are not plugged in and powered all the time, which
    how I advise people to use external drives. Honestly, I do not think they are
    designed for 24/7 service. Anyway, my client has no complaints.

    Another client has three failed external drives, which I will pick up tomorrow
    and do some failure analysis. My son took an external PATA with a used, but
    error free WD 3.5" 250GB drive in it to college, and it crapped out... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 13:22:08 -0500, Paul wrote:

    >wm_walsh@hotmail.com wrote:
    >> Hi!
    >>
    >>> FWIW, I have yet to see an external drive enclosure
    >>> for 2.5" notebook drives with a cooling
    >>> fan... Ben Myers

    >>
    >> How about a heatsink? Other World Computing sells some PATA and SATA
    >> enclosures for 2.5" drives that are neat looking (!!) and completely
    >> bus powered. I think they're somewhat overpriced, so I've purchased
    >> mine secondhand or from their clearance/closeout section.
    >>
    >> I like the clear case because I can stick a "reward if found, please
    >> contact me" notice on top of the drive and have it visible through the
    >> casing. The notice also can't be removed without tools.
    >>
    >> The PATA ones don't have a heatsink (although it doesn't seem to
    >> matter--I have a 7200RPM PATA Hitachi drive running around the clock
    >> in one with no problems over the past few months).
    >>
    >> The SATA ones have a heatsink in their "belly" that grows quite warm
    >> when the drive is on:
    >>
    >> http://eshop.macsales.com/images/Ite...00u2bottom.jpg
    >>
    >> William

    >
    >Some of the current 2.5" drives, draw less than 2.5W total.
    >And that allows them to be bus powered via the USB bus.
    >The average power is lower than that, which is why they
    >don't need a lot of cooling ability.
    >
    >Some of my 3.5" drives, draw 12V @ 0.6A and 5V @ 1A for the motor
    >and controller. That is a larger load, and too much for USB bus
    >powering. The enclosure needs a power source. It could also use
    >some cooling, as even with conduction cooling, parts of the drive
    >may not be making contact with the exterior casing.
    >
    >When one of the pre-packaged externals exhibited a high failure
    >rate, the manufacturer "fixed" it, by setting a short "spindown"
    >time, so the drive would spend more time with the motor off.
    >That reduces power when the drive is not being used, but does
    >not help in the case where a user is doing a file by file backup
    >over a period of several hours.
    >
    >Based on the above, I would have fewer reservations using a 2.5" drive,
    >as at least I could be assured it wouldn't overheat.
    >
    >For 3.5" drives, I have to insist on fan cooling, even if I have to
    >add it myself.
    >
    >I've even seen external enclosures with a fan, but no air intake on
    >the casing! For that one, I had to drill a "Swiss cheese" pattern
    >into the bottom front of the enclosure.
    >
    >For reliability info, all you have to do, is read the customer
    >reviews on Newegg, to get some idea whether 3.5" fanless wonders
    >are a good investment.
    >
    >Maybe the safest thing, is just to leave the raw mechanism lying
    >on the table :-) That cannot be any worse than "cooking" it :-)
    >
    >Kits like this, make it easy to leave the raw drive on the table.
    >http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16812186036
    >
    > Paul


  18. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    wm_walsh@hotmail.com wrote
    > Hi!
    >
    > > I've been noticing that cooling fans are hard to find
    > > in "external HDs". Maybe it's the noise factor?

    >
    > It could very well be--quiet is definitely in, whether it's good for
    > the electronics or not. I also think the problem of finding a
    > *reliable* fan to put in such things could be a factor.
    >
    > If Seagate's offerings aren't satisfactory, I would suggest the
    > possibility of putting your own together. Buy the drive you want, test
    > it out and then put it in the enclosure of your choosing. Below are
    > two that I've used and would recommend:
    >
    > I've put hard drives in a Coolmax CD-311 enclosure and been very happy
    > with the results. This enclosure doesn't have a fan, but it is made of
    > solid aluminum, which is a great heatsink.


    > The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case,


    Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing.

    > so it can take advantage of the additional cooling.


    It only does that if it makes full metal contact over a larger area with it.
    If not then it's actually better to have a larger gap so that air can cir-
    culate and so form a natural heat pump between drive and exterior casing.

    > The really nice thing about this enclosure is the
    > inclusion of USB 2.0, Firewire 400 (iffy with a PATA drive installed
    > under Windows, fine at all times on my Macs and seemingly OK under
    > Windows with a SATA drive inside), and SATA connectors. They even give
    > you a nice slightly magnetized screwdriver to put the thing
    > together...not a big thing, but it's a decent quality tool that you
    > can keep afterwards.
    >
    > If you need a fan (and don't want a power brick), I would highly
    > recommend the Bytecc ME-340 enclosure. While it is a 5.25" device, it
    > comes with a 3.5" device adapter, has a fan and takes a regular
    > computer power plug.
    >
    > These can also be found under other brands. Vantec sells a version of
    > the Bytecc product that is USB only but otherwise identical.
    >
    > William


  19. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    > Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    > interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    > (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    > and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    > (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >
    > Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    > result in information of any certitude.
    >
    > Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    > a cooling fan and and how they get their power?



    Since I was unable to find another eSATA external enclosure
    that has a cooling fan, not even Kingwin's own Z1 series, I opted
    for Kingwin's Jet series with the "belly fan" and the aluminum case:
    http://www.compusa.com/applications/...&sku=K450-5022 ,
    and at another website, but
    the same outfit that runs CompUSA,
    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...&sku=K450-5022

    I'll also try drilling a few ventillation holes as advised by one
    of the product reviewers.

    *TimDaniels*



  20. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Hi!

    > Honestly, I do not think they are designed for 24/7 service.


    Shhh! Don't tell my 2.5" SATA/PATA drives. I hope they didn't hear you
    through their enclosures!

    > My son took an external PATA with a used, but error free WD 3.5" 250GB
    > drive in it to college, and it crapped out... Ben Myers


    If anything, I think that the moving around might be more likely to kill the
    3.5" drives than the 2.5" inch ones. To a lesser extent, perhaps temperature
    changes play into things as well. After all, laptop drives have to (okay,
    "should") stand the sometimes rough conditions in a mobile environment. By
    comparison, the desktop drives that are in these external enclosures
    probably expect to live a quiet life with little moving around.

    William



+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast