cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs - Storage

This is a discussion on cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs - Storage ; Hi! > > The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case, > Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing. If something is being used as a heatsink, it should be making good contact with whatever it is trying ...

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Thread: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

  1. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Hi!

    > > The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case,

    > Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing.


    If something is being used as a heatsink, it should be making good contact
    with whatever it is trying to cool.

    That said, the enclosure is not snug against top and bottom of the
    drive--just the two long sides. Air can flow around the drive quite easily.

    William



  2. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage Timothy Daniels wrote:
    > "Arno Wagner" wrote:
    >> Timothy Daniels wrote:
    >>> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >>> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >>> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).

    >>
    >>> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >>> result in information of any certitude.

    >>
    >>> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >>> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?

    >>
    >>> *TimDaniels*

    >>
    >> It will have some brick-type PSU. USB ports can deliver up to 2.5W
    >> each (high-power ports), while even lean 3.5" HDDs go up to 15W
    >> or so on start-up. So unless they tie 8 high-power ports together
    >> (add two for the DC-DC converters) and put in 5-to-12V step up
    >> converters for 20W (expensive) this is a complete no-go. Technically
    >> feasible though, but unworkable in practice.
    >>
    >> As to cooling, unless they explicitely claim a fan, it is safe to
    >> assume there is none. At least eSATA lets you monitor the temperature,
    >> but I think currently you cannot trust any pre-packaged drive at
    >> all and external an DIY enclosure only if somebody has reviewed its
    >> thermal characteristics.
    >>
    >> My current approach is to be prepared to throw it away
    >> if it does not work out. A sad state of affairs, I know.
    >>
    >> Arno
    >>
    >>


    > I've had some very good luck with HD longevity, and I think it
    > has to do with the generous airflow which keeps the HDs cool.
    > Since the external HD doesn't have to be on all the time, I think
    > I'll take a chance with a Kingwin eSATA box that does have a
    > cooling fan. (They only cost about $30 online.) The fan sits flat
    > with the circuit card on the HD, just like on my Kingwin slide-out
    > HD tray, and that HD never even gets up to body temp.


    Sounds good. And for eSATA you can get the drive temperature,
    e.g. with SpeedFan.

    Arno




  3. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs


    "Timothy Daniels" wrote in message
    news:47c7745b$0$24083$4c368faf@roadrunner.com...
    > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >> result in information of any certitude.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?

    >
    >
    > Since I was unable to find another eSATA external enclosure
    > that has a cooling fan, not even Kingwin's own Z1 series, I opted
    > for Kingwin's Jet series with the "belly fan" and the aluminum case:
    > http://www.compusa.com/applications/...&sku=K450-5022 ,
    > and at another website, but
    > the same outfit that runs CompUSA,
    > http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...&sku=K450-5022
    >
    > I'll also try drilling a few ventillation holes as advised by one
    > of the product reviewers.
    >
    > *TimDaniels*
    >

    Tim, take a look at this Rosewill RX358--I bought one for a client about
    3 weeks back just for the cooling. Note its fan and vents on side and
    front. He wanted a 250gb Seagate in a cool-running ext. drive system. He's
    been quite happy since. Btw, I found a deal on the SG and the Rosewill,
    about $104 for the pair.!!! sam
    >> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817173042 <<




  4. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    "sdlomi2" wrote:
    >
    > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >> "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >>> Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >>> interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >>> and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >>> (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >>>
    >>> Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >>> result in information of any certitude.
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >>> a cooling fan and and how they get their power?

    >>
    >>
    >> Since I was unable to find another eSATA external enclosure
    >> that has a cooling fan, not even Kingwin's own Z1 series, I opted
    >> for Kingwin's Jet series with the "belly fan" and the aluminum case:
    >> http://www.compusa.com/applications/...&sku=K450-5022 ,
    >> and at another website, but
    >> the same outfit that runs CompUSA,
    >> http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...&sku=K450-5022
    >>
    >> I'll also try drilling a few ventillation holes as advised by one
    >> of the product reviewers.
    >>
    >> *TimDaniels*
    >>

    > Tim, take a look at this Rosewill RX358--I bought one for a client about 3
    > weeks back just for the cooling. Note its fan and vents on side and front.
    > He wanted a 250gb Seagate in a cool-running ext. drive system. He's been
    > quite happy since. Btw, I found a deal on the SG and the Rosewill, about $104
    > for the pair.!!! sam
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817173042
    >


    That looks like a good unit. It's price is $10 more than the Kingwin
    "Jet" model, though. And it may have the same slightly restricted airflow
    problem that the Kingwin has - here's the "Con" product review from
    the Newegg webpage:

    "Cons: The fan doesn't blow very well at all. I can barely feel it, but it
    works at under 40C and idles at room temp. Also it could use some
    simple rubber feet but on a smooth surface the metal isnt bad. You
    can stand it up too and its pretty stable."

    Overall price for the Kingwin enclosure and a Seagate DiamondMax
    21 with 320GB capacity came to about $151 with shipping from
    CompUSA. So the bundled deal that you got was pretty good. In the
    future, I think I'll buy a Rosewill for my desktop PC if only to compare
    them. Thanks for the info!

    *TimDaniels*



  5. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    William R. Walsh wrote in news:ZaNxj.1943$TT4.1915@attbi_s22
    > Hi!
    >
    > > > The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case,

    > > Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing.


    > If something is being used as a heatsink,


    > it should be making good contact


    Which it won't with only 4 screws (4 small points of contact).

    > with whatever it is trying to cool.
    >
    > That said, the enclosure is not snug against top and bottom of the
    > drive--just the two long sides.


    > Air can flow around the drive quite easily.


    Sure, IF air was moved mechanically. However, without a fan the air has
    to move itself within the case. For that it needs enough space so that air
    can rise near the drive and descent near the case walls, thus transferring
    the heat energy to the case. Without the necessary space the air will stay
    stagnant and act like an insulator, just like it does in double glazing.

    >
    > William


  6. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    In checking out NewEgg's "Rosewill Store", I spotted this
    2-HD external eSATA/USB enclosure:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817182116
    The only indication that the "SATA" half is eSATA is the eSATA
    cable shown in one of the photos. There is also a fan mentioned
    as being 40mm "high velocity". That might get a little noisy, but
    the reviewers seem to like it a lot.

    *TimDaniels*



  7. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Stretch wrote
    > William R. Walsh wrote


    >>>> The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case,


    >>> Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing.


    >> If something is being used as a heatsink,


    >> it should be making good contact


    > Which it won't with only 4 screws (4 small points of contact).


    It aint just the screws that make contact, the screws pull the rails against the sides of the drives.

    >> with whatever it is trying to cool.


    >> That said, the enclosure is not snug against top
    >> and bottom of the drive--just the two long sides.


    >> Air can flow around the drive quite easily.


    > Sure, IF air was moved mechanically. However, without a fan the
    > air has to move itself within the case. For that it needs enough
    > space so that air can rise near the drive and descent near the
    > case walls, thus transferring the heat energy to the case.


    Nope, not if air can circulate thru the housing and out the top etc.

    > Without the necessary space the air will stay stagnant
    > and act like an insulator, just like it does in double glazing.


    Nothing like double glazing if the are can move from within the case to outside it, even without a fan.



  8. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    The enclosure you are referencing is USB external connection the pc.
    Internally it accepts Sata drives. If you look closely at the image of what
    it referring to as eSata cable, it is in fact the power cord.

    Steve

    "Timothy Daniels" wrote in message
    news:47cc5015$0$17359$4c368faf@roadrunner.com...
    > In checking out NewEgg's "Rosewill Store", I spotted this
    > 2-HD external eSATA/USB enclosure:
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817182116
    > The only indication that the "SATA" half is eSATA is the eSATA
    > cable shown in one of the photos. There is also a fan mentioned
    > as being 40mm "high velocity". That might get a little noisy, but
    > the reviewers seem to like it a lot.
    >
    > *TimDaniels*
    >




  9. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    I did failure analysis on the pair of external drives that my client bought from
    Buy.com, before becoming my client. The brand name is Cavalry, a subsidiary of
    Bason, a Santa Clara outfit that has sold disk drives forever and ever. I even
    remember Bason ads back when PC Magazine was 500-600 pages every two weeks.

    One 3.5" external case had a ventilation fan, the other not. I could not tell
    who manufactured the cases. One drive was a Maxtor with a discolored and
    damaged chip on its circuit board, but no evidence of anything which might have
    grounded out the chip and fried it. The other drive started out as a Western
    Digital, but carried a wierd sticker that I traced back to "Magnetic Data
    Technologies", aka MDT Global, a company advertising itself as refurbishing disk
    drives, whatever that means to them.

    Bottom line is that my client unwittingly bought garbage, and the garbage
    finally failed after a couple years of use... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 12:42:08 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
    wrote:

    >Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >(http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >(http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >
    >Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >result in information of any certitude.
    >
    >Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >
    >*TimDaniels*
    >


  10. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Yup, it looks like Newegg mis-labeled the photo. The interface
    between the box and the PC is probably just USB.

    *TimDaniels*

    "Steve" wrote:
    > The enclosure you are referencing is USB external connection the pc.
    > Internally it accepts Sata drives. If you look closely at the image of what it
    > referring to as eSata cable, it is in fact the power cord.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >> In checking out NewEgg's "Rosewill Store", I spotted this
    >> 2-HD external eSATA/USB enclosure:
    >> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817182116
    >> The only indication that the "SATA" half is eSATA is the eSATA
    >> cable shown in one of the photos. There is also a fan mentioned
    >> as being 40mm "high velocity". That might get a little noisy, but
    >> the reviewers seem to like it a lot.
    >>
    >> *TimDaniels*
    >>

    >
    >




  11. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Thanks for the word on "Calvary". But there will always be garbage
    out there for sale as Good Stuff. Caveat Emptor still holds. That is
    why I bought the hard drive separately (not bundled), and I'll assure
    that there is adequate cooling before relying on an enclosure for it.

    *TimDaniels*


    "Ben Myers" wrote:
    > I did failure analysis on the pair of external drives that my client bought
    > from Buy.com, before becoming my client. The brand name is Cavalry,
    > a subsidiary of Bason, a Santa Clara outfit that has sold disk drives
    > forever and ever. I even remember Bason ads back when PC Magazine
    > was 500-600 pages every two weeks.
    >
    > One 3.5" external case had a ventilation fan, the other not. I could not tell
    > who manufactured the cases. One drive was a Maxtor with a discolored
    > and damaged chip on its circuit board, but no evidence of anything which
    > might have grounded out the chip and fried it. The other drive started out
    > as a Western Digital, but carried a wierd sticker that I traced back to
    > "Magnetic Data Technologies", aka MDT Global, a company advertising
    > itself as refurbishing disk drives, whatever that means to them.
    >
    > Bottom line is that my client unwittingly bought garbage, and the garbage
    > finally failed after a couple years of use... Ben Myers
    >
    > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    >>Seagate makes some of its "external HDs" with eSATA
    >>interfaces, specifically the "Free Agent Pro"
    >>(http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...o_data_movers/)
    >>and the "eSATA External Hard Drive"
    >>(http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ta_hard_drive/).
    >>
    >>Unfortunately, calls to Seagate's pre-sales reps in India don't
    >>result in information of any certitude.
    >>
    >>Does anyone know if these external enclosures include
    >>a cooling fan and and how they get their power?
    >>
    >>*TimDaniels*
    >>




  12. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    To be perfectly real about it, the ONLY sensible approach to external drives is
    to buy the case, and buy a RELIABLE drive from a RELIABLE source, and use a
    small Philips head screwdriver to assemble. That way, you KNOW exactly what you
    are getting. Many people do not have enough knowledge to do this well.

    Second choice is to buy from a source who will tell you exactly what is inside
    the drive and give you a guarantee, subject to normal use. That's what quoted
    to my client today along with prices that are probably higher than Best Buy etc.
    Their budget is somewhat impoverished, and I suspect they'll buy on price, not
    quality.

    The serious problem with Buy.com, Tiger Direct and these other mail order joints
    is that THEY often do not know what they are selling, as evidenced by the
    results of my teardown of the two failed drives. They probably do not care too
    much either... Ben Myers

    On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 15:17:41 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
    wrote:

    >Thanks for the word on "Calvary". But there will always be garbage
    >out there for sale as Good Stuff. Caveat Emptor still holds. That is
    >why I bought the hard drive separately (not bundled), and I'll assure
    >that there is adequate cooling before relying on an enclosure for it.
    >
    >*TimDaniels*
    >



  13. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    "Ben Myers" wrote:
    > To be perfectly real about it, the ONLY sensible approach to
    > external drives is to buy the case, and buy a RELIABLE drive
    > from a RELIABLE source...


    I bought my SATA Seagate HD from Newegg. I have
    previously bought new OEM Maxtor DiamondMax HDs
    from no-name vendors (with 4 to 5 out-of-5 ratings) without
    any problems, but I admit that my purchases are statistically
    insignificant.

    *TimDaniels*



  14. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Timothy "Timmy" Daniels wrote in news:47cdd69d$0$24078$4c368faf@roadrunner.com
    > Yup, it looks like Newegg mis-labeled the photo.


    No! Really? Shock, horror.

    > The interface between the box and the PC is probably just USB.


    Yeah, the product description and photos of the enclosure's backside
    are in all likelyhood incorrect. Which means that the clearly visible
    sata connector on the back left to the USB is probably not wired.
    Weird huh.

    >
    > *TimDaniels*
    >
    > "Steve" wrote:
    > > The enclosure you are referencing is USB external connection the pc.
    > > Internally it accepts Sata drives. If you look closely at the image of what
    > > it referring to as eSata cable, it is in fact the power cord.
    > >
    > > Steve
    > >
    > > "Timothy Daniels" wrote:
    > > > In checking out NewEgg's "Rosewill Store", I spotted this
    > > > 2-HD external eSATA/USB enclosure:
    > > > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817182116
    > > > The only indication that the "SATA" half is eSATA is the eSATA
    > > > cable shown in one of the photos. There is also a fan mentioned
    > > > as being 40mm "high velocity". That might get a little noisy, but
    > > > the reviewers seem to like it a lot.
    > > >
    > > > *TimDaniels*


  15. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Rod Speed wrote in news:633b8iF25ri9mU1@mid.individual.net
    > Stretch wrote
    > > William R. Walsh wrote

    >
    > > > > > The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case,

    >
    > > > > Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing.

    >
    > > > If something is being used as a heatsink,

    >
    > > > it should be making good contact

    >
    > > Which it won't with only 4 screws (4 small points of contact).


    > It aint just the screws that make contact, the screws pull the rails
    > against the sides of the drives.


    Which they won't, to the degree that is necessary to make good contact
    over a larger area. Only the metal between the screwhead and the (ho-
    pefully) machined flat mounting hole will be making contact and only if
    the screw is thightened to the extend that the (hopefully softmetal)
    rail deforms to the shape of the drive's side around the mounting hole.
    For that you must probably use more force than the drive's mounting
    instructions allow.
    (And pity the drives that are mounted through the bottom holes). With
    the afore mentioned Coolmax CD-311 the drive is mounted (through the
    sides) in the extruded bottom halve of the enclosure which (presumably)
    is of hardened aluminum. The top halve is then slided onto the bottom hal-
    ve which again doesn't make for very good contact with the bottom halve.

    >
    > > > with whatever it is trying to cool.


    > > > That said, the enclosure is not snug against top
    > > > and bottom of the drive--just the two long sides.

    >
    > > > Air can flow around the drive quite easily.

    >
    > > Sure, IF air was moved mechanically. However, without a fan the
    > > air has to move itself within the case. For that it needs enough
    > > space so that air can rise near the drive and descent near the
    > > case walls, thus transferring the heat energy to the case.


    > Nope, not if air can circulate thru the housing and out the top etc.


    Too bad that a Coolmax CD-311 -which the previous comments were
    based on- doesn't have that.

    >
    > > Without the necessary space the air will stay stagnant
    > > and act like an insulator, just like it does in double glazing.


    > Nothing like double glazing if the are can move from within the case to
    > outside it, even without a fan.


    Too bad that in a Coolmax CD-311 -which the previous comments were
    based on- that won't happen. It's as good as air thight unless you take
    off the plastic clamps that double as feet.
    And even then the drive itself will block the airflow.


  16. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    "Stretch" sucked his brown nugets:
    > Yeah, the product description and photos of the enclosure's backside
    > are in all likelyhood incorrect. Which means that the clearly visible
    > sata connector on the back left to the USB is probably not wired.
    > Weird huh.



    Stretch, you're as strange as your fake mis-spellings . Here is the
    copy from the listing's overview:

    "A USB 2.0 interface connects the enclosure to your Mac or PC
    while the internal SATA I/II interface eliminates bottlenecks."

    The Product Tour lists only a USB 2.0 interface:

    USB 2.0 Interface
    The Rosewill RX82-U features a USB 2.0 interface for fast data
    transfer speeds of up to 480Mbps and plug-and-play connectivity.

    The Quick Specs list only a USB external interface:
    Quick Specs
    Brand Rosewill
    Material Aluminum
    Size 3.5"
    Internal Interface SATA
    Fan Yes
    External Interface USB 2.0


    The Specifications page lists:

    Internal Interface SATA I/II
    External Interface USB 2.0(Transfer Rates Up To 480 Mbps)


    And here is the photo of the back of the box:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ShowIm...rnal+Enclosure

    So where is the "SATA connector on the back left to the USB"?

    *TimDaniels*



  17. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Stretch wrote
    > Rod Speed wrote
    >> Stretch wrote
    >>> William R. Walsh wrote


    >>>>>> The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case,


    >>>>> Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing.


    >>>> If something is being used as a heatsink,


    >>>> it should be making good contact


    >>> Which it won't with only 4 screws (4 small points of contact).


    >> It aint just the screws that make contact, the
    >> screws pull the rails against the sides of the drives.


    > Which they won't, to the degree that is necessary
    > to make good contact over a larger area.


    Wrong, as always. They do that just as well as they do with internal drive stacks.

    > Only the metal between the screwhead and the (hopefully)
    > machined flat mounting hole will be making contact


    Wrong, as always.

    > and only if the screw is thightened to the extend that the (hopefully softmetal)
    > rail deforms to the shape of the drive's side around the mounting hole.


    Doesnt need to deform to make a lot more contact than your
    stupid pig ignorant claim about it just being the screws in contact.

    > For that you must probably use more force
    > than the drive's mounting instructions allow.


    Wrong, as always.

    > (And pity the drives that are mounted through the bottom holes).


    Still get the same effect with those.

    > With the afore mentioned Coolmax CD-311 the drive is mounted
    > (through the sides) in the extruded bottom halve of the enclosure
    > which (presumably) is of hardened aluminum.


    Stupid presumption.

    > The top halve is then slided onto the bottom hal- ve which
    > again doesn't make for very good contact with the bottom halve.


    Doesnt need to, the bottom half is plenty.

    >>>> with whatever it is trying to cool.


    >>>> That said, the enclosure is not snug against top
    >>>> and bottom of the drive--just the two long sides.


    >>>> Air can flow around the drive quite easily.


    >>> Sure, IF air was moved mechanically. However, without a fan the
    >>> air has to move itself within the case. For that it needs enough
    >>> space so that air can rise near the drive and descent near the
    >>> case walls, thus transferring the heat energy to the case.


    >> Nope, not if air can circulate thru the housing and out the top etc.


    > Too bad that a Coolmax CD-311 -which the
    > previous comments were based on- doesn't have that.


    Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.

    >>> Without the necessary space the air will stay stagnant
    >>> and act like an insulator, just like it does in double glazing.


    >> Nothing like double glazing if the are can move from
    >> within the case to outside it, even without a fan.


    > Too bad that in a Coolmax CD-311 -which the previous
    > comments were based on- that won't happen.


    Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.

    > It's as good as air thight unless you
    > take off the plastic clamps that double as feet.
    > And even then the drive itself will block the airflow.


    Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.



  18. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Deep insights! ... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 17:38:53 +1100, "Rod Speed" wrote:

    >Stretch wrote
    >> Rod Speed wrote
    >>> Stretch wrote
    >>>> William R. Walsh wrote

    >
    >>>>>>> The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case,

    >
    >>>>>> Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing.

    >
    >>>>> If something is being used as a heatsink,

    >
    >>>>> it should be making good contact

    >
    >>>> Which it won't with only 4 screws (4 small points of contact).

    >
    >>> It aint just the screws that make contact, the
    >>> screws pull the rails against the sides of the drives.

    >
    >> Which they won't, to the degree that is necessary
    >> to make good contact over a larger area.

    >
    >Wrong, as always. They do that just as well as they do with internal drive stacks.
    >
    >> Only the metal between the screwhead and the (hopefully)
    >> machined flat mounting hole will be making contact

    >
    >Wrong, as always.
    >
    >> and only if the screw is thightened to the extend that the (hopefully softmetal)
    >> rail deforms to the shape of the drive's side around the mounting hole.

    >
    >Doesnt need to deform to make a lot more contact than your
    >stupid pig ignorant claim about it just being the screws in contact.
    >
    >> For that you must probably use more force
    >> than the drive's mounting instructions allow.

    >
    >Wrong, as always.
    >
    >> (And pity the drives that are mounted through the bottom holes).

    >
    >Still get the same effect with those.
    >
    >> With the afore mentioned Coolmax CD-311 the drive is mounted
    >> (through the sides) in the extruded bottom halve of the enclosure
    >> which (presumably) is of hardened aluminum.

    >
    >Stupid presumption.
    >
    >> The top halve is then slided onto the bottom hal- ve which
    >> again doesn't make for very good contact with the bottom halve.

    >
    >Doesnt need to, the bottom half is plenty.
    >
    >>>>> with whatever it is trying to cool.

    >
    >>>>> That said, the enclosure is not snug against top
    >>>>> and bottom of the drive--just the two long sides.

    >
    >>>>> Air can flow around the drive quite easily.

    >
    >>>> Sure, IF air was moved mechanically. However, without a fan the
    >>>> air has to move itself within the case. For that it needs enough
    >>>> space so that air can rise near the drive and descent near the
    >>>> case walls, thus transferring the heat energy to the case.

    >
    >>> Nope, not if air can circulate thru the housing and out the top etc.

    >
    >> Too bad that a Coolmax CD-311 -which the
    >> previous comments were based on- doesn't have that.

    >
    >Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.
    >
    >>>> Without the necessary space the air will stay stagnant
    >>>> and act like an insulator, just like it does in double glazing.

    >
    >>> Nothing like double glazing if the are can move from
    >>> within the case to outside it, even without a fan.

    >
    >> Too bad that in a Coolmax CD-311 -which the previous
    >> comments were based on- that won't happen.

    >
    >Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.
    >
    >> It's as good as air thight unless you
    >> take off the plastic clamps that double as feet.
    >> And even then the drive itself will block the airflow.

    >
    >Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.
    >


  19. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Yours in spades

    Ben Myers wrote:
    > Deep insights! ... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 17:38:53 +1100, "Rod Speed"
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Stretch wrote
    >>> Rod Speed wrote
    >>>> Stretch wrote
    >>>>> William R. Walsh wrote

    >>
    >>>>>>>> The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case,

    >>
    >>>>>>> Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing.

    >>
    >>>>>> If something is being used as a heatsink,

    >>
    >>>>>> it should be making good contact

    >>
    >>>>> Which it won't with only 4 screws (4 small points of contact).

    >>
    >>>> It aint just the screws that make contact, the
    >>>> screws pull the rails against the sides of the drives.

    >>
    >>> Which they won't, to the degree that is necessary
    >>> to make good contact over a larger area.

    >>
    >> Wrong, as always. They do that just as well as they do with internal
    >> drive stacks.
    >>
    >>> Only the metal between the screwhead and the (hopefully)
    >>> machined flat mounting hole will be making contact

    >>
    >> Wrong, as always.
    >>
    >>> and only if the screw is thightened to the extend that the
    >>> (hopefully softmetal) rail deforms to the shape of the drive's side
    >>> around the mounting hole.

    >>
    >> Doesnt need to deform to make a lot more contact than your
    >> stupid pig ignorant claim about it just being the screws in contact.
    >>
    >>> For that you must probably use more force
    >>> than the drive's mounting instructions allow.

    >>
    >> Wrong, as always.
    >>
    >>> (And pity the drives that are mounted through the bottom holes).

    >>
    >> Still get the same effect with those.
    >>
    >>> With the afore mentioned Coolmax CD-311 the drive is mounted
    >>> (through the sides) in the extruded bottom halve of the enclosure
    >>> which (presumably) is of hardened aluminum.

    >>
    >> Stupid presumption.
    >>
    >>> The top halve is then slided onto the bottom hal- ve which
    >>> again doesn't make for very good contact with the bottom halve.

    >>
    >> Doesnt need to, the bottom half is plenty.
    >>
    >>>>>> with whatever it is trying to cool.

    >>
    >>>>>> That said, the enclosure is not snug against top
    >>>>>> and bottom of the drive--just the two long sides.

    >>
    >>>>>> Air can flow around the drive quite easily.

    >>
    >>>>> Sure, IF air was moved mechanically. However, without a fan the
    >>>>> air has to move itself within the case. For that it needs enough
    >>>>> space so that air can rise near the drive and descent near the
    >>>>> case walls, thus transferring the heat energy to the case.

    >>
    >>>> Nope, not if air can circulate thru the housing and out the top
    >>>> etc.

    >>
    >>> Too bad that a Coolmax CD-311 -which the
    >>> previous comments were based on- doesn't have that.

    >>
    >> Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.
    >>
    >>>>> Without the necessary space the air will stay stagnant
    >>>>> and act like an insulator, just like it does in double glazing.

    >>
    >>>> Nothing like double glazing if the are can move from
    >>>> within the case to outside it, even without a fan.

    >>
    >>> Too bad that in a Coolmax CD-311 -which the previous
    >>> comments were based on- that won't happen.

    >>
    >> Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.
    >>
    >>> It's as good as air thight unless you
    >>> take off the plastic clamps that double as feet.
    >>> And even then the drive itself will block the airflow.

    >>
    >> Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.




  20. Re: cooling Seagate eSATA external HDs

    Ben Myers wrote
    > Deep insights! ... Ben Myers


    Yeah, it's always a joy to see Speedles explode when he's been beaten
    and make a complete fool of himself.
    He'd make an excellent study case for upcoming psychiatrists.

    > On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 17:38:53 +1100, "Rod Speed" wrote:
    > > Stretch wrote
    > > > Rod Speed wrote
    > > > > Stretch wrote
    > > > > > William R. Walsh wrote

    > >
    > > > > > > > > The drive fits snugly against the sides of the case,
    > > > > > > > Actually, that's not necessarily a good thing.
    > > > > > > If something is being used as a heatsink, it should be making good contact
    > > > > > Which it won't with only 4 screws (4 small points of contact).

    > >
    > > Wrong, as always.
    > >
    > > Wrong, as always.
    > >
    > >... stupid pig ignorant claim ...
    > >
    > > Wrong, as always.
    > >
    > > Stupid presumption.
    > >
    > > Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.
    > >
    > > Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.
    > >
    > > Irrelevant to the general claim you stupidly made.


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