Seagate 750's in a 9-bay FireWire enclosure? - Storage

This is a discussion on Seagate 750's in a 9-bay FireWire enclosure? - Storage ; Did anyone succeed to fill a 8 or 9 bay HD enclosure with Seagate 750's and got them all to work? I had until now 5 of these 750s working in my enclosure... two per FireWire port as master / ...

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Thread: Seagate 750's in a 9-bay FireWire enclosure?

  1. Seagate 750's in a 9-bay FireWire enclosure?

    Did anyone succeed to fill a 8 or 9 bay HD enclosure with Seagate
    750's and got them all to work?

    I had until now 5 of these 750s working in my enclosure... two per
    FireWire port as master / slave pairs, the last lonely HD set to
    master. The rig worked like a charm.

    But now that I'm trying to add the next 2 Seagate 750's following the
    same system, for a total of seven - no dice. One of more of the HDs
    always vanishes. Formatting of the new drives fails. Swapping cables
    and FireWire ports solves nothing.

    Did anyone run into the same problem, yet? Was there a solution?

    My only hunch for now is that perhaps the 300 Watt power supply in my
    enclosure is too weak to run more than five 750 Giggers along with
    their 10 cooling fans, hence all these weird problems, caused by power
    fluctuation. Perhaps i should plug a voltmeter into one of the
    remaining empty HD power plugs and measure what I get, as compared to
    the Seagate's +5V 0.72A and +12V 0.52A specs, printed on the label?
    (Then again, it's only a hunch...)

    Grateful thanks for all helpful suggestions in advance

    George

  2. Re: Seagate 750's in a 9-bay FireWire enclosure?

    In article ,
    George K. wrote:

    > But now that I'm trying to add the next 2 Seagate 750's following the
    > same system, for a total of seven - no dice. One of more of the HDs
    > always vanishes. Formatting of the new drives fails. Swapping cables
    > and FireWire ports solves nothing.


    do you have top quality firewire cabling?

    > My only hunch for now is that perhaps the 300 Watt power supply in my
    > enclosure is too weak to run more than five 750 Giggers along with
    > their 10 cooling fans, hence all these weird problems, caused by power
    > fluctuation.


    that's my first guess.

    > Perhaps i should plug a voltmeter into one of the
    > remaining empty HD power plugs and measure what I get, as compared to
    > the Seagate's +5V 0.72A and +12V 0.52A specs, printed on the label?
    > (Then again, it's only a hunch...)


    that's not spin-up power. i can't find the spec for spin-up power for
    that drive at seagate.com but i checked a hitachi drive and it needed
    +12v @ 2a and +5 @ 1.2a. that's 30 watts right there, times nine
    drives is 270 watts, plus the fans, so a power issue is quite likely.

    can you stagger the spin-ups so it doesn't tax the power supply?

  3. Re: Seagate 750's in a 9-bay FireWire enclosure?

    I cannot stagger the spin-up, the enclosure has only 1 power button. I
    started solving the riddle by disconnecting all the power and data
    cables to ALL drives inside the enclosure. Then I connected one
    Firewire connector with one ribbon cable (which I knew to be working)
    to the first 2 HDs, tested them, went on the next 2 HDs, etc. This
    proved that all the HD pairs spin up and work with the computer fine
    by themselves. Next I started substituting the other ribbon cables,
    and the other FireWire connectors. By doing this I soon established
    that I of the 5 ribbon cables and 2 of the 5 FireWire connectors ("IDE
    to FireWire converter bridgeboards" in fancy lingo) in the enclosure
    are dead.

    After throwing those away ("weeding my enclosure"... how pastoral), I
    got six HDs, two per each remaining good FireWire connector / ribbon
    cable to spin up and work just peachy. So we have an intermediate
    solution, a pared-down rig. Now the question is, what killed so many
    of these parts, could it be still a lack of juice? But how could that
    kill a ribbon cable?

    The answer determines what I do next. I could simply get more FireWire
    connectors to replace the dead ones, and upgrade (or not) the power
    supply. Or I could beef up the power supply and get ribbon cables with
    4 HD connectors instead of 2 to use the remaining good FireWire
    connectors. Or I could start looking into FireWire to SATA connectors
    instead, from now, if this is an issue of IDE to FireWire converters
    being simply poorly made. Any suggestions?


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