Opinions sought on a way to fix a failed IBM Deskstar HDD - Storage

This is a discussion on Opinions sought on a way to fix a failed IBM Deskstar HDD - Storage ; Hello My 100GB IBM Deskstar ("DeathStar") drive (type IC35L100 series ) packed up a few days ago. It was being used in an IDE- USB enclosure and basically , XP failed to recognise it as a drive. I tried it ...

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Thread: Opinions sought on a way to fix a failed IBM Deskstar HDD

  1. Opinions sought on a way to fix a failed IBM Deskstar HDD

    Hello

    My 100GB IBM Deskstar ("DeathStar") drive (type IC35L100 series ) packed up
    a few days ago. It was being used in an IDE- USB enclosure and basically ,
    XP failed to recognise
    it as a drive. I tried it in the computer's BIOS which also fails to
    recognise it.

    Judging by the sound it makes, the heads are tracking across the platters OK
    but failing to calibrate or locate track 0. Internet research suggests an
    NVRAM failure ( the HDD BIOS may be corrupted).

    Having found a potential donor 120GB Hitachi drive (Hit. took over IBM's HDD
    business), I plan to get a known working controller PCB with a similar
    Machine Level Code (MLC) revision, and substitute it for the board on my
    failed drive. I aim to recover some/all data this way. Again, internet
    research shows some success ... but only "some".

    Questions then:

    1) Does anyone know what the NVRAM or BIOS actually does on a HDD that might
    change between revisions of the same HDD, or between generically similar
    versions of the same HDD?

    2) How likely do you think I might be in succeeding, whereby I use a similar
    MLC coded PCB but not identical? A daft question I suppose in that the
    changes per MLC release may be significant.

    It's not a subject I am particularly familiar with so if someone has some
    suggestions I'd be happy to learn. Unfortunately, a data recovery company
    will charge many hundres of pounds so not viable in this case.

    Thanks for any useful tips or experiences you can share; I don't know a fat
    lot about the component-level functionality of how a hard drive works so I'm
    keen to learn a little.

    DDS




  2. Re: Opinions sought on a way to fix a failed IBM Deskstar HDD

    Duncan Di Saudelli wrote

    > My 100GB IBM Deskstar ("DeathStar") drive (type IC35L100 series )
    > packed up a few days ago. It was being used in an IDE- USB enclosure and basically , XP failed to recognise it as a
    > drive. I tried it in the computer's BIOS which also fails to recognise it.


    > Judging by the sound it makes, the heads are tracking across the platters OK


    Presumably you actually mean that the heads do move.

    > but failing to calibrate or locate track 0. Internet research suggests an NVRAM failure ( the HDD BIOS may be
    > corrupted).


    Its much more likely to be just another deathstar failure that produced a full class action suit.

    > Having found a potential donor 120GB Hitachi drive (Hit. took over
    > IBM's HDD business), I plan to get a known working controller PCB
    > with a similar Machine Level Code (MLC) revision, and substitute it
    > for the board on my failed drive. I aim to recover some/all data this
    > way. Again, internet research shows some success ... but only "some".


    > Questions then:


    > 1) Does anyone know what the NVRAM or BIOS actually does on a HDD that might change between revisions of the same HDD,
    > or between generically similar versions of the same HDD?


    Can be anything that changes between versions.

    > 2) How likely do you think I might be in succeeding, whereby I use a similar MLC coded PCB but not identical?


    Depends on whether there was a substantial change between those.

    > A daft question I suppose in that the changes per MLC release may be significant.


    Yep, and its impossible to predict how significant with a particular pair.

    > It's not a subject I am particularly familiar with so if someone has some suggestions I'd be happy to learn.
    > Unfortunately, a data recovery company will charge many hundres of pounds so not viable in this case.


    There are a few that dont charge as much as that.

    > Thanks for any useful tips or experiences you can share; I don't know a fat lot about the component-level
    > functionality of how a hard drive works so I'm keen to learn a little.


    The last thing you should be doing is learning on a drive where the data matters.



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