WSS versus Windows 2003 Server - Storage

This is a discussion on WSS versus Windows 2003 Server - Storage ; I'm trying to understand the technical differences between WSS and a regular Windows 2003 Server (std or EE) which is deployed as a storage server. It's been hard to wade through all the marketing materials, but from what I have ...

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Thread: WSS versus Windows 2003 Server

  1. WSS versus Windows 2003 Server

    I'm trying to understand the technical differences between WSS and a regular
    Windows 2003 Server (std or EE) which is deployed as a storage server.

    It's been hard to wade through all the marketing materials, but from what I
    have read, I think it consists of the following:

    WSS is an OEM product, so there may be pricing differences (better) than
    using off-the-shelf Windows 2003 Server (and available is limited to OEM's,
    maybe system builders too)

    WSS includes the web based management software that has evolved from the
    earlier Windows NAS/Hosting appliances. Some of this web "front end" is
    bundled with Windows 2003 server also.

    WSS has MPIO. It is unclear to me whether this is a built-in feature, or
    merely the ability to load a 3rd party DDK-based driver for MPIO. (In the
    latter case, the DDK could possibly also be loaded onto regular Windows 2003).

    So, if I want to configure a WSS-type server and I don't want to spend the
    big $$ to buy from a brand-name company with high-end configurations, and I
    also don't want to buy from a 2nd tier brand but would prefer to configure my
    own server with my own choice of motherboard and drive subsystem, if I
    configure a "storage server" using Windows 2003, do I "lose" any capability
    other than the enhanced web "front end"?

  2. Re: WSS versus Windows 2003 Server

    Storage Server also includes directory level quotas (vs Volume level) and
    reporting capabilities, and most vendors include AV software (which you may
    already have anyway) and/or a backup solution/management solution (this
    varies significantly by vendor). Otherwise, you should be OK.


    Pat

    "Robert E. Spivack" Spivack@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
    message news:11000B17-38AD-4FAF-819B-C3E81B282157@microsoft.com...
    > I'm trying to understand the technical differences between WSS and a
    > regular
    > Windows 2003 Server (std or EE) which is deployed as a storage server.
    >
    > It's been hard to wade through all the marketing materials, but from what
    > I
    > have read, I think it consists of the following:
    >
    > WSS is an OEM product, so there may be pricing differences (better) than
    > using off-the-shelf Windows 2003 Server (and available is limited to
    > OEM's,
    > maybe system builders too)
    >
    > WSS includes the web based management software that has evolved from the
    > earlier Windows NAS/Hosting appliances. Some of this web "front end" is
    > bundled with Windows 2003 server also.
    >
    > WSS has MPIO. It is unclear to me whether this is a built-in feature, or
    > merely the ability to load a 3rd party DDK-based driver for MPIO. (In the
    > latter case, the DDK could possibly also be loaded onto regular Windows
    > 2003).
    >
    > So, if I want to configure a WSS-type server and I don't want to spend the
    > big $$ to buy from a brand-name company with high-end configurations, and
    > I
    > also don't want to buy from a 2nd tier brand but would prefer to configure
    > my
    > own server with my own choice of motherboard and drive subsystem, if I
    > configure a "storage server" using Windows 2003, do I "lose" any
    > capability
    > other than the enhanced web "front end"?




  3. Re: WSS versus Windows 2003 Server

    MPIO is not included on either product, although WSS vendors may include
    MPIO with their offerings that attach to SAN storage (e.g., "NAS heads").
    You cannot install MPIO from the DDK - that is licensed to storage vendors
    and they need to package a complete solution, although in some cases all
    they do is rename a few files and build an installer application. They are
    required to test and submit these solutions through WHQL before offering
    them to customers and the program has numerous other provisions to insure
    compatibility of multi-vendor solutions and conformance to standards.

    The licensing model for WSS is different from WS03 as well.

    "Pat [MSFT]" wrote in message
    news:ePrG$QnfEHA.708@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Storage Server also includes directory level quotas (vs Volume level) and
    > reporting capabilities, and most vendors include AV software (which you
    > may already have anyway) and/or a backup solution/management solution
    > (this varies significantly by vendor). Otherwise, you should be OK.
    >
    >
    > Pat
    >
    > "Robert E. Spivack" Spivack@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
    > message news:11000B17-38AD-4FAF-819B-C3E81B282157@microsoft.com...
    >> I'm trying to understand the technical differences between WSS and a
    >> regular
    >> Windows 2003 Server (std or EE) which is deployed as a storage server.
    >>
    >> It's been hard to wade through all the marketing materials, but from what
    >> I
    >> have read, I think it consists of the following:
    >>
    >> WSS is an OEM product, so there may be pricing differences (better) than
    >> using off-the-shelf Windows 2003 Server (and available is limited to
    >> OEM's,
    >> maybe system builders too)
    >>
    >> WSS includes the web based management software that has evolved from the
    >> earlier Windows NAS/Hosting appliances. Some of this web "front end" is
    >> bundled with Windows 2003 server also.
    >>
    >> WSS has MPIO. It is unclear to me whether this is a built-in feature, or
    >> merely the ability to load a 3rd party DDK-based driver for MPIO. (In
    >> the
    >> latter case, the DDK could possibly also be loaded onto regular Windows
    >> 2003).
    >>
    >> So, if I want to configure a WSS-type server and I don't want to spend
    >> the
    >> big $$ to buy from a brand-name company with high-end configurations, and
    >> I
    >> also don't want to buy from a 2nd tier brand but would prefer to
    >> configure my
    >> own server with my own choice of motherboard and drive subsystem, if I
    >> configure a "storage server" using Windows 2003, do I "lose" any
    >> capability
    >> other than the enhanced web "front end"?

    >
    >




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