Re: SATA vs. SCSI, RAID? - Storage

This is a discussion on Re: SATA vs. SCSI, RAID? - Storage ; As I've been saying all along, warranty length has nothing to do with expected HD life nor reliability. Warranty length is simply a marketing and a price point decision by HD mfgs. Longer warranties cost the HD mfgs slightly more ...

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Thread: Re: SATA vs. SCSI, RAID?

  1. Re: SATA vs. SCSI, RAID?

    As I've been saying all along, warranty length has nothing to do with
    expected HD life nor reliability. Warranty length is simply a marketing and
    a price point decision by HD mfgs. Longer warranties cost the HD mfgs
    slightly more to provide; that's all.

    Since that's true, then a HD mfg could simply change the warranty length at
    their whim, if it suited their marketing and price point thinking as any
    technical design, drive life and reliability factors aren't significantly
    involved IF the warranty length is within the expected drive life:
    http://www.seagate.com/cda/newsinfo/...1,2285,00.html

    The above in essence simply announces a price reduction on all Seagate HDs
    that previously had a 1 year or 3 year warranty. The expected drive life
    remains unchanged. That was always over 5 years. The policy is retroactive
    to shipped(not manufactirered) after 6/1/04.



  2. Re: SATA vs. SCSI, RAID?

    Root,

    Generally when a HDD manufacturer switches warranty length it indicates that
    QA has determined a higher rate of production outside tolerances. Since
    major PC OEM manufacturers will continue to receive HDD manufactured within
    specified tolerances, the channel will receive a greater number of drives
    outside accepted QA tolerances.

    Since Seagate is making this bold move they must really be doing well in QA.
    Funny thing is that one of my clients had a 146 GB U320 Seagate fail this
    week and they wouldn't do AWR without charging a $250 fee. So the client has
    to either fork over $250 bucks or wait until they get around to shipping him
    a new drive. The drive is 41 days old. Hmmmm!

    Jeff Loucks
    Available Technology
    Solutions For Professionals
    www.availabletechnology.com


    "root" wrote in message
    news:ue7DAMBdEHA.244@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > As I've been saying all along, warranty length has nothing to do with
    > expected HD life nor reliability. Warranty length is simply a marketing

    and
    > a price point decision by HD mfgs. Longer warranties cost the HD mfgs
    > slightly more to provide; that's all.
    >
    > Since that's true, then a HD mfg could simply change the warranty length

    at
    > their whim, if it suited their marketing and price point thinking as any
    > technical design, drive life and reliability factors aren't significantly
    > involved IF the warranty length is within the expected drive life:
    >

    http://www.seagate.com/cda/newsinfo/...1,2285,00.html
    >
    > The above in essence simply announces a price reduction on all Seagate HDs
    > that previously had a 1 year or 3 year warranty. The expected drive life
    > remains unchanged. That was always over 5 years. The policy is

    retroactive
    > to shipped(not manufactirered) after 6/1/04.
    >
    >




  3. Re: SATA vs. SCSI, RAID?


    "Jeff L" wrote in
    message news:ubXe5WEdEHA.2452@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Root,
    >
    > Generally when a HDD manufacturer switches warranty length it indicates

    that
    > QA has determined a higher rate of production outside tolerances.


    Clueless. Read the Seagate press release.




  4. Re: SATA vs. SCSI, RAID?

    I read it. Read my post, it makes it quite clear that I understand the press
    release. The question is why all of a sudden are they Charging for Advanced
    Warranty Replacement. Perhaps a slight shell game with the costs.

    I am reposting my previous post so that you can reread it. This time it
    might be clearer to you.

    Root,

    Generally when a HDD manufacturer switches warranty length it indicates that
    QA has determined a higher rate of production outside tolerances. Since
    major PC OEM manufacturers will continue to receive HDD manufactured within
    specified tolerances, the channel will receive a greater number of drives
    outside accepted QA tolerances.

    ***Since Seagate is making this bold move they must really be doing well in
    QA.***
    Funny thing is that one of my clients had a 146 GB U320 Seagate fail this
    week and they(Seagate) wouldn't do AWR(Advanced Warranty Replacement)
    without charging a $250 fee. So the client has to either fork over $250
    bucks or wait until they get around to shipping him a new drive. The drive
    is 41 days old. Hmmmm!

    Jeff Loucks
    Available Technology
    Solutions For Professionals
    www.availabletechnology.com



    "root" wrote in message
    news:uZq$o7FdEHA.712@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "Jeff L" wrote in
    > message news:ubXe5WEdEHA.2452@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > Root,
    > >
    > > Generally when a HDD manufacturer switches warranty length it indicates

    > that
    > > QA has determined a higher rate of production outside tolerances.

    >
    > Clueless. Read the Seagate press release.
    >
    >
    >




  5. Re: SATA vs. SCSI, RAID?


    "Jeff L" wrote in
    message news:OFVSmFGdEHA.1184@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > I read it.


    Obviously you didn't comprehend it.

    >Read my post, it makes it quite clear that I understand the press
    > release.


    No, it makes quite clear that you did NOT.

    > The question is why all of a sudden are they Charging for Advanced
    > Warranty Replacement. Perhaps a slight shell game with the costs.


    No such thing has occurred. Why did you just make that up? Are we a little
    out of our depth here?

    > I am reposting my previous post so that you can reread it. This time it
    > might be clearer to you.


    What's clear is that you just don't get it.

    > Root,
    >
    > Generally when a HDD manufacturer switches warranty length it indicates

    that
    > QA has determined a higher rate of production outside tolerances. Since
    > major PC OEM manufacturers will continue to receive HDD manufactured

    within
    > specified tolerances, the channel will receive a greater number of drives
    > outside accepted QA tolerances.
    >
    > ***Since Seagate is making this bold move they must really be doing well

    in
    > QA.***
    > Funny thing is that one of my clients had a 146 GB U320 Seagate fail this
    > week and they(Seagate) wouldn't do AWR(Advanced Warranty Replacement)
    > without charging a $250 fee. So the client has to either fork over $250
    > bucks or wait until they get around to shipping him a new drive. The drive
    > is 41 days old. Hmmmm!
    >
    > Jeff Loucks
    > Available Technology
    > Solutions For Professionals
    > www.availabletechnology.com
    >
    >
    >
    > "root" wrote in message
    > news:uZq$o7FdEHA.712@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > >
    > > "Jeff L" wrote in
    > > message news:ubXe5WEdEHA.2452@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > > Root,
    > > >
    > > > Generally when a HDD manufacturer switches warranty length it

    indicates
    > > that
    > > > QA has determined a higher rate of production outside tolerances.

    > >
    > > Clueless. Read the Seagate press release.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >




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