Re: Bad Sectors problem - Storage

This is a discussion on Re: Bad Sectors problem - Storage ; On Feb 6, 9:30 am, n...@spam.invalid (Aamir) wrote: > ... > Fourth, i also noted these from motherboard bios > ... > +1.5Vin 1.532V > Vccp -1.717 -1.705 V > +3.3Vin 3.293 ~ 3.310 V > +5Vin 5.2631 ~ 5.2636 ...

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Thread: Re: Bad Sectors problem

  1. Re: Bad Sectors problem

    On Feb 6, 9:30 am, n...@spam.invalid (Aamir) wrote:
    > ...
    > Fourth, i also noted these from motherboard bios
    > ...
    > +1.5Vin 1.532V
    > Vccp -1.717 -1.705 V
    > +3.3Vin 3.293 ~ 3.310 V
    > +5Vin 5.2631 ~ 5.2636
    > +12Vin 11.812~11.750 V[/color:83981915e1]
    > Are these values satisfactory ??
    >
    > Fifth, How can i check if power supply is going smoothly or not??


    Voltage measurements when system is fully loaded (multitasking to
    all peripherals simultaneously) tell whether the power supply is
    'smooth'. Those BIOS numbers still must be 'calibrated' by a 3.5
    digit multimeter.

    Assuming those BIOS numbers are accurate, well, each voltage is in
    spec. But 5 volts being so high and +12 volts so low implies a
    marginal power supply or noise problem. Unfortunately, the only way
    to see a possible power supply noise problem is with an oscilloscope.

    Meanwhile, a lower 12 volts should not adversely affect disk drive.
    Computer will have nothing to do with bad sectors. Disk drive
    controller is on the disk drive. No disk drive controller exists on
    motherboard. Motherboard simply sends command to a disk drive
    computer. Disk drive computer handles all disk sector access which is
    why bad disk sectors cannot be created by anything on motherboard.

    Only symptom (as provided) that might explain errors on both drives
    is the unusually high 5 volts and moderately low +12 volts. Again,
    these numbers are in spec but the voltage difference could be
    explained by to too much 12 volt load or by excessive voltage noise
    that can only be observed with a scope. If using a different supply
    and that 'high 5 and low 12' disappears, then that might solve the
    disk drive sector failures. But again, this is all speculation until
    those BIOS measured voltages are 'calibrated' with a meter.


  2. Re: Bad Sectors problem

    w_tom wrote:
    > On Feb 6, 9:30 am, n...@spam.invalid (Aamir) wrote:
    >> ...
    >> Fourth, i also noted these from motherboard bios
    >> ...
    >> +1.5Vin 1.532V
    >> Vccp -1.717 -1.705 V
    >> +3.3Vin 3.293 ~ 3.310 V
    >> +5Vin 5.2631 ~ 5.2636
    >> +12Vin 11.812~11.750 V[/color:83981915e1]
    >> Are these values satisfactory ??
    >>
    >> Fifth, How can i check if power supply is going smoothly or not??

    >
    > Voltage measurements when system is fully loaded (multitasking to
    > all peripherals simultaneously) tell whether the power supply is
    > 'smooth'. Those BIOS numbers still must be 'calibrated' by a 3.5
    > digit multimeter.
    >
    > Assuming those BIOS numbers are accurate, well, each voltage is in
    > spec. But 5 volts being so high and +12 volts so low implies a
    > marginal power supply or noise problem. Unfortunately, the only way
    > to see a possible power supply noise problem is with an oscilloscope.
    >
    > Meanwhile, a lower 12 volts should not adversely affect disk drive.
    > Computer will have nothing to do with bad sectors. Disk drive
    > controller is on the disk drive. No disk drive controller exists on
    > motherboard. Motherboard simply sends command to a disk drive
    > computer. Disk drive computer handles all disk sector access which is
    > why bad disk sectors cannot be created by anything on motherboard.
    >
    > Only symptom (as provided) that might explain errors on both drives
    > is the unusually high 5 volts and moderately low +12 volts. Again,
    > these numbers are in spec but the voltage difference could be
    > explained by to too much 12 volt load or by excessive voltage noise
    > that can only be observed with a scope. If using a different supply
    > and that 'high 5 and low 12' disappears, then that might solve the
    > disk drive sector failures. But again, this is all speculation until
    > those BIOS measured voltages are 'calibrated' with a meter.


    That last isnt even possible. The problem aint with the 'calibration'
    its actually with the pathetic lack of resolution of the onboard sensors.



  3. Re: Bad Sectors problem

    "w_tom" wrote in message news:1170842072.783656.229040@v33g2000cwv.googlegr oups.com
    > On Feb 6, 9:30 am, n...@spam.invalid (Aamir) wrote:
    > > ...
    > > Fourth, i also noted these from motherboard bios
    > > ...
    > > +1.5Vin 1.532V
    > > Vccp -1.717 -1.705 V
    > > +3.3Vin 3.293 ~ 3.310 V
    > > +5Vin 5.2631 ~ 5.2636
    > > +12Vin 11.812~11.750 V
    > > Are these values satisfactory ??
    > >
    > > Fifth, How can i check if power supply is going smoothly or not??

    >
    > Voltage measurements when system is fully loaded (multitasking to
    > all peripherals simultaneously) tell whether the power supply is
    > 'smooth'. Those BIOS numbers still must be 'calibrated' by a 3.5
    > digit multimeter.


    > Assuming those BIOS numbers are accurate, well, each voltage is
    > in spec. But 5 volts being so high and +12 volts so low implies a
    > marginal power supply or noise problem.


    Obviously that depends on what the voltages are without any power drawn.

    > Unfortunately, the only way to see a possible power supply noise
    > problem is with an oscilloscope.


    Nope, unless you're interrested in High Frequency noise.
    High Frequency noise will not cause bad sectors.

    >
    > Meanwhile, a lower 12 volts should not adversely affect disk drive.
    > Computer will have nothing to do with bad sectors. Disk drive control-
    > ler is on the disk drive. No disk drive controller exists on mother-
    > board. Motherboard simply sends command to a disk drive computer.


    > Disk drive computer handles all disk sector access which is why
    > bad disk sectors cannot be created by anything on motherboard.


    Pity that some drives in the past wrote bad sectors when something
    wasn't as it should be on the interface. It was a firmware problem
    in the drive controller. Pity about 'Write Long' too.

    >
    > Only symptom (as provided) that might explain errors on both drives
    > is the unusually high 5 volts and moderately low +12 volts. Again,
    > these numbers are in spec but the voltage difference could be
    > explained by to too much 12 volt load or by excessive voltage noise
    > that can only be observed with a scope. If using a different supply
    > and that 'high 5 and low 12' disappears, then that might solve the
    > disk drive sector failures. But again, this is all speculation until
    > those BIOS measured voltages are 'calibrated' with a meter.


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