SSD retrofit in an old laptop? - Storage

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  1. SSD retrofit in an old laptop?

    How close are we to an 8 GB IDE 2.5" form factor SSD hard-drive
    replacement for an old laptop or notebook computer, allowing it to
    become a totally silent word processor / email / whatever, with long
    battery life? Target price: $150 (US) or less.

    --
    Jonathan Berry


  2. Re: SSD retrofit in an old laptop?

    "Jonathan Berry" writes:
    > How close are we to an 8 GB IDE 2.5" form factor SSD hard-drive
    > replacement for an old laptop or notebook computer, allowing it to
    > become a totally silent word processor / email / whatever, with long
    > battery life? Target price: $150 (US) or less.


    http://www.logicsupply.com/product_i...roducts_id/337

    plus

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820211048

    total under $100.

  3. Re: SSD retrofit in an old laptop?

    Jonathan Berry wrote:
    > How close are we to an 8 GB IDE 2.5" form factor SSD hard-drive
    > replacement for an old laptop or notebook computer, allowing it to
    > become a totally silent word processor / email / whatever, with long
    > battery life?


    1. Replacing your laptop's hard drive may cut down on noise enough to
    make you happy (though I'm not unhappy with the amount of noise my aging
    Thinkpad 570E's laptop's hard drive makes, and newer drives allegedly
    are even quieter), but it won't make the laptop anywhere nearly 'totally
    silent' unless the laptop doesn't have an internal cooling fan for the
    processor/MB (mine does).

    2. Replacing your laptop's hard drive won't make a significant
    difference to battery life, since the hard drive typically is only about
    15% of the total load (the processor and display, including back-light,
    being the major culprits - converting to led back-lights should help the
    latter soon in new laptops). I've had luck using supplementary
    batteries that I steal from my power tools when I want longer
    disconnected operation (my 18v Makita batteries need about 4 3A diodes
    to step them down under minimal load when fully charged to the 17v upper
    limit that my Thinkpad's hardware manual specifies), but of course there
    are commercial sources for laptop-specific supplementary batteries as
    well (or you can cobble up your own using NiMH cells - it takes about 12
    in series to produce what my Thinkpad wants to see, but using AAs you'd
    probably want to get fairly high energy ones - over 2Ah - and use them
    in parallel pairs or even triplets; my Thinkpad cuts over to using the
    internal battery when its external supply voltage drops to about 12.5v,
    which is about a reasonable maximum discharge limit for both the
    approaches I just described).

    - bill

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