building nas server for home network - Storage

This is a discussion on building nas server for home network - Storage ; Hi, I'm in need for (budget) storage at home. After doing a little research i decided to build my own NAS server. I've got an "old" AMD Athlon XP 2400+ with one GB of ram, so that will be more ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: building nas server for home network

  1. building nas server for home network

    Hi,

    I'm in need for (budget) storage at home. After doing a little
    research i decided to build my own NAS server.
    I've got an "old" AMD Athlon XP 2400+ with one GB of ram, so that will
    be more than sufficient i guess.

    I've been thinking of doing the following, but i wonder if it's the
    best way to do it:

    - I can use the onboard IDE or SATA port to setup a mirrored OS (two
    small drives).

    - I'll add an 8 port SATA Raid controller, for example the FastTrak
    SX8300 from Promise Technology to store all data in RAID5. I can
    attach 8x 250GB discs = 2000 GB in total , minus one disc for Raid5 =
    1750 GB for data! That should be enough for a long time!....

    - With this setup i have fault tolerance for both OS and especially
    for the data!

    What do you guys think of this setup? Is the FastTrak a good choice?
    Are there better disc configs?

    One very important question remains: i'd very much like an automated
    backup, not expensive of course. Raid5 is fault tolerant, but of
    course, i still need a way to backup my data! How can i do this? Or
    should i add 320gb dics (to have more storage) and then use a part of
    the discs for backup purposes? What's good software to backup to
    HDD? Or is there a better solution?

    This is all new for me, so i can use some advice :-)

    Thanks in advance guys!
    Kris


  2. Re: building nas server for home network

    On 16 mrt, 09:03, "kris.vandevij...@gmail.com"
    wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm in need for (budget) storage at home. After doing a little
    > research i decided to build my own NAS server.
    > I've got an "old" AMD Athlon XP 2400+ with one GB of ram, so that will
    > be more than sufficient i guess.
    >


    ....


    An additional question: i just read that there are SATA I and SATA II
    compliant raid controllers on the market. Since only two or three
    users will be accessing the NAS server, i wonder if this is important
    for me? My motherboard doesn't support PCI-Express so i'm hoping
    that SATA I will be sufficient. Also, isn't the network the
    bottleneck here and not the SATA I or II controller?

    thanks again!
    Kris




  3. Re: building nas server for home network

    kris.vandevijver@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm in need for (budget) storage at home. After doing a little
    > research i decided to build my own NAS server.
    > I've got an "old" AMD Athlon XP 2400+ with one GB of ram, so that will
    > be more than sufficient i guess.
    >
    > I've been thinking of doing the following, but i wonder if it's the
    > best way to do it:
    >
    > - I can use the onboard IDE or SATA port to setup a mirrored OS (two
    > small drives).
    >
    > - I'll add an 8 port SATA Raid controller, for example the FastTrak
    > SX8300 from Promise Technology to store all data in RAID5. I can
    > attach 8x 250GB discs = 2000 GB in total , minus one disc for Raid5 =
    > 1750 GB for data! That should be enough for a long time!....
    >
    > - With this setup i have fault tolerance for both OS and especially
    > for the data!
    >
    > What do you guys think of this setup? Is the FastTrak a good choice?
    > Are there better disc configs?
    >
    > One very important question remains: i'd very much like an automated
    > backup, not expensive of course. Raid5 is fault tolerant, but of
    > course, i still need a way to backup my data! How can i do this? Or
    > should i add 320gb dics (to have more storage) and then use a part of
    > the discs for backup purposes? What's good software to backup to
    > HDD? Or is there a better solution?
    >
    > This is all new for me, so i can use some advice :-)


    Well, different people can have different ideas about just what 'budget'
    means, but to establish a base-line from which you could work upward I'd
    suggest getting rid of the RAID controller (for the price of which you
    can buy well over 1 TB of disk today if you shop around) and using
    software RAID (which will allow you to mirror your OS on a small portion
    of some of the same disks you use to hold your data - either use
    slightly larger disks in those cases, or if you choose to use RAID-1 for
    your data just cut back on the usable data storage on one pair by the
    size of your OS).

    Use software RAID-5 if you're willing to chance a rare data corruption
    if your system dies (perhaps due to a simple loss of power) and a disk
    turns up dead on restart. If a write was being performed at the time of
    the system failure and either the associated data or the parity got
    updated but not both, when you go to reconstitute the piece of the RAID
    stripe that was on the failed disk you'll get garbage, unless you were
    lucky and that piece was the data being written (in which case you're no
    worse off than for any write operation that may or may not have fully
    completed) or was the associated parity.

    Otherwise, use software RAID-1 (mirroring - you can use all the cash you
    saved by not buying the hardware RAID card to make up the difference in
    storage required, and you'll get better performance, both when writing
    and when operating with a failed disk, in the bargain).

    Using larger (and fewer) disks would mean that you didn't need nearly as
    many ports to connect them to. The lowest-cost option would be to use
    the two ATA cable ports on your MB support four disks by themselves (at
    Ultra-100/133 speeds sharing an ATA cable may still provide acceptable
    performance for your needs), but PCI cards that add two more ATA ports
    (each of which can support another 2 disks if need be) are very
    inexpensive (SATA cards may be as well, but I haven't priced them
    recently). ATA drives have been cheap as chips for a long time, but
    SATA drives are also plummeting toward the $0.25/GB mark now. The main
    difference between them is that the most recent SATA drives support
    native command queuing, which can make a noticeable performance
    difference in heavy server use (then again, it doesn't sound as if your
    use is likely to be anywhere nearly that heavy).

    As for backing up to the disks in the same array, I don't think you'll
    find too many people who would recommend that: there are just too many
    situations where losing your data would also mean losing its backup
    copies (which ideally are kept separated, both electronically and in
    space, for that reason).

    In any event, good luck - hope it works out well.

    - bill

  4. Re: building nas server for home network

    On 17 mrt, 04:26, Bill Todd wrote:
    >
    > Well, different people can have different ideas about just what 'budget'
    > means, but to establish a base-line from which you could work upward I'd
    > suggest getting rid of the RAID controller (for the price of which you
    > can buy well over 1 TB of disk today if you shop around) and using
    > software RAID (which will allow you to mirror your OS on a small portion
    > of some of the same disks you use to hold your data - either use
    > slightly larger disks in those cases, or if you choose to use RAID-1 for
    > your data just cut back on the usable data storage on one pair by the
    > size of your OS).
    >
    > ...
    >
    > - bill-



    Bill,

    Wow! Many many thanks for all this great info!
    I must say that i learned a lot!

    -Kris


  5. Re: building nas server for home network

    On Mar 26, 4:52 am, "kris.vandevij...@gmail.com"
    wrote:
    > On 17 mrt, 04:26, Bill Todd wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Well, different people can have different ideas about just what 'budget'
    > > means, but to establish a base-line from which you could work upward I'd
    > > suggest getting rid of the RAID controller (for the price of which you
    > > can buy well over 1 TB of disk today if you shop around) and using
    > > software RAID (which will allow you to mirror your OS on a small portion
    > > of some of the same disks you use to hold your data - either use
    > > slightly larger disks in those cases, or if you choose to use RAID-1 for
    > > your data just cut back on the usable data storage on one pair by the
    > > size of your OS).

    >
    > > ...

    >
    > > - bill-

    >
    > Bill,
    >
    > Wow! Many many thanks for all this great info!
    > I must say that i learned a lot!
    >
    > -Kris



    If you don't mind me sidetracking the discussion:
    How about just buying a small purpose-built mini-NAS server from
    Adaptec:

    http://www.adaptec.com/en-US/product...ap_Server_110/
    http://www.adaptec.com/en-US/product...ap_Server_210/

    The 210 series uses 2x HD and can be set up with RAID1 for protection
    against disk failure.
    Silent, power efficient, small.

    Might be more $$ up front than a BYO solution, but tested, proven,
    supported etc.
    Hey, it even supports iSCSI !

    I have used the now-obsolete Snap Server 1100, and was very happy with
    it.


  6. Re: building nas server for home network

    In article <1175013571.314952.105720@n76g2000hsh.googlegroups. com>,
    knutmeidal@gmail.com says...
    >
    >On Mar 26, 4:52 am, "kris.vandevij...@gmail.com"
    > wrote:
    >> On 17 mrt, 04:26, Bill Todd wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > Well, different people can have different ideas about just what 'budget'
    >> > means, but to establish a base-line from which you could work upward I'd
    >> > suggest getting rid of the RAID controller (for the price of which you
    >> > can buy well over 1 TB of disk today if you shop around) and using
    >> > software RAID (which will allow you to mirror your OS on a small portion
    >> > of some of the same disks you use to hold your data - either use
    >> > slightly larger disks in those cases, or if you choose to use RAID-1 for
    >> > your data just cut back on the usable data storage on one pair by the
    >> > size of your OS).

    >>
    >> > ...

    >>
    >> > - bill-

    >>
    >> Bill,
    >>
    >> Wow! Many many thanks for all this great info!
    >> I must say that i learned a lot!
    >>
    >> -Kris

    >
    >
    >If you don't mind me sidetracking the discussion:
    >How about just buying a small purpose-built mini-NAS server from
    >Adaptec:
    >
    >http://www.adaptec.com/en-US/product...ap_Server_110/
    >http://www.adaptec.com/en-US/product...ap_Server_210/
    >
    >The 210 series uses 2x HD and can be set up with RAID1 for protection
    >against disk failure.
    >Silent, power efficient, small.
    >
    >Might be more $$ up front than a BYO solution, but tested, proven,
    >supported etc.
    >Hey, it even supports iSCSI !
    >
    >I have used the now-obsolete Snap Server 1100, and was very happy with
    >it.
    >


    then you'd be one of the few people happy with a SNAP server NAS
    (or iSCSI) solution. most of the people I know, including Adaptec,
    are NOT happy with the performance, support or reliability of SNAP
    products. There are plenty of inexpensive NAS solutions around,
    including many based on Windows. look at www.xtore-es.com and call
    or email me if you need any help figuring out the configuration.

    _____ . .
    ' \\ . . |>>
    O// . . |
    \_\ . . |
    | | . . . |
    / | . www.EvenEnterprises.com . . . |
    / .| info@EvenEnterprises.com . . . |
    / . | 310-544-9439 / 310-544-9309 fax . . . o
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Authorized - DIRECT VAR/VAD/Distributor for new mid-high end storage
    iSCSI/NAS/SAN/RAID from EMC, HP, Equallogic, Quantum, OverLand Storage


  7. Re: building nas server for home network

    I just a built a home NAS (amongst other things) using off-the -shelf
    components from Frys. $1100 for:

    Motherboard with on board graphics, Gbit NIC and SATA RAID (0, 1, 0+1)
    3Ghz Dual Core P4
    4GB Memory
    4x300GB SATA-II
    Hot swap drive bay (4x 3.5 SATA drives in 3x5.25" bays)
    Midtower chassis

    Add another $30 for a DVD-burner if you want one (I already had one
    spare) And you are good to go.
    --
    Nik Simpson

  8. Re: building nas server for home network

    >
    > then you'd be one of the few people happy with a SNAP server NAS
    > (or iSCSI) solution. most of the people I know, including Adaptec,
    > are NOT happy with the performance, support or reliability of SNAP
    > products. There are plenty of inexpensive NAS solutions around,
    > including many based on Windows. look atwww.xtore-es.comand call
    > or email me if you need any help figuring out the configuration.
    >


    The 110/210 is different (newer/better) than the discontinued
    1100/2100 series.
    I have heard little negative about the 1100 series, and even fewer for
    the 110.
    I would absolutely like to know what experiences people have with them
    (110/210), and I will happily change my mind about them.


    > _____ . .
    > ' \\ . . |>>
    > O// . . |
    > \_\ . . |
    > | | . . . |
    > / | . www.EvenEnterprises.com . . . |
    > / .| i...@EvenEnterprises.com . . . |
    > / . | 310-544-9439 / 310-544-9309 fax . . . o
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Authorized - DIRECT VAR/VAD/Distributor for new mid-high end storage
    > iSCSI/NAS/SAN/RAID from EMC, HP, Equallogic, Quantum, OverLand Storage


    Quite a long signature...
    And I couldn't bring up that link...


+ Reply to Thread