Question about Microsoft's Format command - Storage

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  1. Question about Microsoft's Format command

    Are a disk's bad sectors marked while formatting?


  2. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command


    "yukuan" wrote in message
    news:1119723267.948141.224470@g49g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    > Are a disk's bad sectors marked while formatting?


    The simple answer is yes. But I suspect you need to ask a more precise
    question. What do you have in mind when you say "bad sectors marked "?



  3. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command

    I means it recording which sector is bad in the FAT, while formatting
    with fat16, fat32 etc.


  4. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command


    "yukuan" wrote in message
    news:1119724277.788790.61400@g14g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
    > I means it recording which sector is bad in the FAT, while formatting
    > with fat16, fat32 etc.


    In general on a modern HD there should be no bad sectors.



  5. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command

    How about the virtual HD, flash pendrive?


  6. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command

    Yes. FORMAT is who creates the new empty FS volume, the bad blocks are
    marked during this.

    --
    Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    StorageCraft Corporation
    maxim@storagecraft.com
    http://www.storagecraft.com

    "yukuan" wrote in message
    news:1119723267.948141.224470@g49g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    > Are a disk's bad sectors marked while formatting?
    >




  7. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command

    THX all you for these response.
    I still have some questions:
    How does FORMAT decide that a block is bad?
    Does It use the procedure of write, read and compare.
    or just decide bad block via got a action-fail message from the
    storage's controller?


  8. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command


    "yukuan" wrote in message
    news:1119764390.690762.268870@g43g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    > THX all you for these response.
    > I still have some questions:
    > How does FORMAT decide that a block is bad?


    Writes it and sees if it can be read.

    > Does It use the procedure of write, read and compare.


    Right but I don't think there's a compare.

    > or just decide bad block via got a action-fail message from the
    > storage's controller?


    That happens on a write fail and a read fail. The read fail is the usual
    case.



  9. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command

    Still,
    during the lifetime after FORMAT, what's going on if the storage gets
    new bad blocks?
    Will these bad blocks be recorded?


  10. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command


    "yukuan" wrote in message
    news:1119767127.694486.251990@g43g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    > Still,
    > during the lifetime after FORMAT, what's going on if the storage gets
    > new bad blocks?


    Mostly the drive detects a block going bad before it's completely
    unreadable. The drive flaws(replaces it with a good one) the sector and you
    never see a thing. Occasionally if the sector goes bad while it's holding
    file data then the file will become unreadable and the sector show up as a
    visible bad sector. When many visible bad sectors start showing then the
    drive is likely about to die.

    > Will these bad blocks be recorded?


    "recorded"?



  11. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command

    Ron Reaugh wrote:
    > Mostly the drive detects a block going bad before it's completely
    > unreadable. The drive flaws(replaces it with a good one) the sector and you
    > never see a thing. Occasionally if the sector goes bad while it's holding
    > file data then the file will become unreadable and the sector show up as a
    > visible bad sector. When many visible bad sectors start showing then the
    > drive is likely about to die.


    Are the visible bad sectors going to be marked into the FAT?

    > > Will these bad blocks be recorded?

    >
    > "recorded"?


    I meant the new visible bad blocks are marked/signed/redorded into the
    FAT.

    Thank you.


  12. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command


    "yukuan" wrote in message
    news:1119839887.413654.4400@g44g2000cwa.googlegrou ps.com...
    > Ron Reaugh wrote:
    > > Mostly the drive detects a block going bad before it's completely
    > > unreadable. The drive flaws(replaces it with a good one) the sector and

    you
    > > never see a thing. Occasionally if the sector goes bad while it's

    holding
    > > file data then the file will become unreadable and the sector show up as

    a
    > > visible bad sector. When many visible bad sectors start showing then

    the
    > > drive is likely about to die.

    >
    > Are the visible bad sectors going to be marked into the FAT?


    Visible = = "marked into the FAT"



  13. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command

    > I still have some questions:
    > How does FORMAT decide that a block is bad?
    > Does It use the procedure of write, read and compare.


    No, it uses IOCTL_DISK_VERIFY.

    --
    Maxim Shatskih, Windows DDK MVP
    StorageCraft Corporation
    maxim@storagecraft.com
    http://www.storagecraft.com



  14. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command

    That is a funny statement :-)

    "Ron Reaugh" wrote in message
    news:Fuhve.1025350$w62.420029@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >
    > "yukuan" wrote in message
    > news:1119724277.788790.61400@g14g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
    >> I means it recording which sector is bad in the FAT, while formatting
    >> with fat16, fat32 etc.

    >
    > In general on a modern HD there should be no bad sectors.
    >
    >




  15. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command


    "Ramesh Pun" wrote in message
    news:11c3qf14t25pg2a@corp.supernews.com...
    > That is a funny statement :-)


    A correct one however. I should have said no visible bad sectors. Every
    drive has lots of bad sectors but the drive itself keeps these isolated and
    out of the way and invisible.
    >
    > "Ron Reaugh" wrote in message
    > news:Fuhve.1025350$w62.420029@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > >
    > > "yukuan" wrote in message
    > > news:1119724277.788790.61400@g14g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
    > >> I means it recording which sector is bad in the FAT, while formatting
    > >> with fat16, fat32 etc.

    > >
    > > In general on a modern HD there should be no bad sectors.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >




  16. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command



    Ron Reaugh wrote:
    > "Ramesh Pun" wrote in message
    > news:11c3qf14t25pg2a@corp.supernews.com...
    > > That is a funny statement :-)

    >
    > A correct one however. I should have said no visible bad sectors. Every
    > drive has lots of bad sectors but the drive itself keeps these isolated and
    > out of the way and invisible.


    What if the drive gets _too_ many bad sectors?
    Is it goint to crash?


  17. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command


    "yukuan" wrote in message
    news:1120054213.053949.157610@g44g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
    >
    >
    > Ron Reaugh wrote:
    > > "Ramesh Pun" wrote in message
    > > news:11c3qf14t25pg2a@corp.supernews.com...
    > > > That is a funny statement :-)

    > >
    > > A correct one however. I should have said no visible bad sectors.

    Every
    > > drive has lots of bad sectors but the drive itself keeps these isolated

    and
    > > out of the way and invisible.

    >
    > What if the drive gets _too_ many bad sectors?


    Retire the drive.

    > Is it goint to crash?


    More bad sectors than the drive can handle internally could be used as a
    definition of a drive crashing.



  18. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command



    Ron Reaugh wrote:
    > >
    > > What if the drive gets _too_ many bad sectors?

    >
    > Retire the drive.
    >
    > > Is it goint to crash?

    >
    > More bad sectors than the drive can handle internally could be used as a
    > definition of a drive crashing.


    But FAT can handle bad sectors, couldn't it?
    When does OS mark the bad sectors?
    I think it may do it in two situations:
    1. FORMAT time
    2. Normal data access time
    Am I right?


  19. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command


    "yukuan" wrote in message
    news:1120097751.845132.248630@f14g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
    >
    >
    > Ron Reaugh wrote:
    > > >
    > > > What if the drive gets _too_ many bad sectors?

    > >
    > > Retire the drive.
    > >
    > > > Is it goint to crash?

    > >
    > > More bad sectors than the drive can handle internally could be used as a
    > > definition of a drive crashing.

    >
    > But FAT can handle bad sectors, couldn't it?


    Not without first being involved in a file going bad.

    > When does OS mark the bad sectors?


    Usually during the initial format and later if a file becomes unreadable.

    > I think it may do it in two situations:
    > 1. FORMAT time
    > 2. Normal data access time
    > Am I right?


    Basically.



  20. Re: Question about Microsoft's Format command



    Ron Reaugh wrote:

    > > But FAT can handle bad sectors, couldn't it?

    >
    > Not without first being involved in a file going bad.
    >
    > > When does OS mark the bad sectors?

    >
    > Usually during the initial format and later if a file becomes unreadable.
    >


    For FAT16 and FAT32 on MS's platform, is the statement above still true?


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