SSH for a standalone - SSH

This is a discussion on SSH for a standalone - SSH ; I am trying to understand ssh and I have some problems. So I need to ask a dumb question. Make that two dumb questions. Can a stand alone, say a laptop, connecting only with "outside" servers; that is, web sites, ...

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Thread: SSH for a standalone

  1. SSH for a standalone

    I am trying to understand ssh and I have some problems.

    So I need to ask a dumb question.

    Make that two dumb questions.

    Can a stand alone, say a laptop, connecting only with "outside" servers;
    that is, web sites, email ISP's, etc., benefit from ssh tunneling?

    In cases as above, does the remote require a key?

    My laptop is not part of any network. It is the typical laptop belonging
    to a loner.

    CSSJR

  2. Re: SSH for a standalone

    >>>>> "CSS" == Claude S Sutton writes:

    CSS> I am trying to understand ssh and I have some problems. So I
    CSS> need to ask a dumb question.

    CSS> Make that two dumb questions.

    CSS> Can a stand alone, say a laptop, connecting only with "outside"
    CSS> servers; that is, web sites, email ISP's, etc., benefit from ssh
    CSS> tunneling?

    Sure, as long as you have an account on an external machine you can ssh
    into.

    CSS> In cases as above, does the remote require a key?

    There are various methods of authentication; usually you can just type in
    a password if you want.

    CSS> My laptop is not part of any network. It is the typical laptop
    CSS> belonging to a loner.

    CSS> CSSJR

    --
    Richard Silverman
    res@qoxp.net


  3. Re: SSH for a standalone

    Claude S. Sutton wrote:
    > I am trying to understand ssh and I have some problems.
    >
    > So I need to ask a dumb question.
    >
    > Make that two dumb questions.
    >
    > Can a stand alone, say a laptop, connecting only with "outside" servers;
    > that is, web sites, email ISP's, etc., benefit from ssh tunneling?
    >
    > In cases as above, does the remote require a key?
    >
    > My laptop is not part of any network. It is the typical laptop belonging
    > to a loner.
    >
    > CSSJR


    The server you connect to must be running an ssh server.

    I use it to access resources on verizon's network that are only
    available to verizon subscribers. From work I cannot access any of those
    resources, so I set up an ssh server on my home PC. I can create a
    tunnel from the work PC to the home PC and use the home PC as a socks
    proxy server. Now I can access all of those verizon services that I
    subscribe to at home, from work. An added benefit is that if I access my
    private email through that tunnel/proxy, it's encrypted before it gets
    to the the corporate network so my private email cannot be read by
    anyone monitoring the network. I should point out however that it is
    *not* encrypted between the proxy (ssh) server and the email server.

  4. Re: SSH for a standalone

    On Thu, 25 Jan 2007 16:46:37 +0000, Chuck wrote:

    > Claude S. Sutton wrote:
    >> I am trying to understand ssh and I have some problems.
    >>
    >> So I need to ask a dumb question.
    >>
    >> Make that two dumb questions.
    >>
    >> Can a stand alone, say a laptop, connecting only with "outside" servers;
    >> that is, web sites, email ISP's, etc., benefit from ssh tunneling?
    >>
    >> In cases as above, does the remote require a key?
    >>
    >> My laptop is not part of any network. It is the typical laptop belonging
    >> to a loner.
    >>
    >> CSSJR

    >
    > The server you connect to must be running an ssh server.
    >
    > I use it to access resources on verizon's network that are only
    > available to verizon subscribers. From work I cannot access any of those
    > resources, so I set up an ssh server on my home PC. I can create a
    > tunnel from the work PC to the home PC and use the home PC as a socks
    > proxy server. Now I can access all of those verizon services that I
    > subscribe to at home, from work. An added benefit is that if I access my
    > private email through that tunnel/proxy, it's encrypted before it gets
    > to the the corporate network so my private email cannot be read by
    > anyone monitoring the network. I should point out however that it is
    > *not* encrypted between the proxy (ssh) server and the email server.


    Thank you for taking the time to explain how you use it.

    I have a very superficial understanding of how it is used between "family"
    so to speak; that is multi-plant, multi-store, multi-office organizations
    and of course you are using it in a similar manner.

    I had read about tunneling and got confused that there was a feature there
    that I now understand is not.

    Thanks.

    CSSJR


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