rsync shooting itself in the foot by setting permission 000 on directory - SSH

This is a discussion on rsync shooting itself in the foot by setting permission 000 on directory - SSH ; During a backup of a large directory from a Windows XP machine to a Linux machine, rsync sets permissions on a directory to 000. This effectively prevents it from writing the subdirectories and files to it. The user my rsync ...

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Thread: rsync shooting itself in the foot by setting permission 000 on directory

  1. rsync shooting itself in the foot by setting permission 000 on directory

    During a backup of a large directory from a Windows XP machine to a
    Linux machine, rsync sets permissions on a directory to 000. This
    effectively prevents it from writing the subdirectories and files to it.

    The user my rsync script runs as on the winbox does have access to these
    files, so even when preserving permissions, it should be accessible for
    the rsync user on the target machine. I could probably work around this
    by not using the --perms option and setting an umask at the receiving
    end, but it's not very elegant.

    Any other ideas? Is this even a feature?

    The rsync version on the windows machine is

    rsync version 2.6.8 protocol version 29
    Copyright (C) 1996-2006 by Andrew Tridgell, Wayne Davison, and others.

    Capabilities: 64-bit files, socketpairs, hard links, symlinks,
    batchfiles, inplace, no IPv6, 64-bit system inums, 64-bit internal inums

  2. Re: rsync shooting itself in the foot by setting permission 000 on directory


    Steven Mocking wrote:

    > During a backup of a large directory from a Windows XP machine to a
    > Linux machine, rsync sets permissions on a directory to 000. This
    > effectively prevents it from writing the subdirectories and files to it.
    >
    > The user my rsync script runs as on the winbox does have access to these
    > files, so even when preserving permissions, it should be accessible for
    > the rsync user on the target machine. I could probably work around this
    > by not using the --perms option and setting an umask at the receiving
    > end, but it's not very elegant.
    >
    > Any other ideas? Is this even a feature?


    Rsync runs extremely poorly on Windows machines, in my experience. I'd
    suggest you make sure to use "rsync -avvH" to do a bit of testing, but
    even better do a Samba mount of the directory on the Linux machine, and
    rsync *THAT* to your local Linux box. And look into using "rsnapshot"
    to make it a bit safer and faster.


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