What is the difference between ftp encryption types SSL, TLS, SFTP and SSH ? - SSH

This is a discussion on What is the difference between ftp encryption types SSL, TLS, SFTP and SSH ? - SSH ; NK> Ertugrul Soeylemez wrote: >> The downside of SFTP is that there is no trusted arbitrator (a CA >> in SSL/TLS terminology). This is not a property of SFTP at all, but rather of some implementations, OpenSSH in particular. Both ...

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Thread: What is the difference between ftp encryption types SSL, TLS, SFTP and SSH ?

  1. Re: What is the difference between ftp encryption types SSL, TLS, SFTP and SSH ?


    NK> Ertugrul Soeylemez wrote:


    >> The downside of SFTP is that there is no trusted arbitrator (a CA
    >> in SSL/TLS terminology).


    This is not a property of SFTP at all, but rather of some implementations,
    OpenSSH in particular. Both the VanDyke and ssh.com products, for
    example, support X.509 certificates for host and user authentication.

    --
    Richard Silverman
    res@qoxp.net


  2. Re: What is the difference between ftp encryption types SSL, TLS, SFTP and SSH ?

    "Ertugrul Soeylemez" ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:emesp9$3jo$02$1@news.t-online.com...
    mmmm@buzz.com (Marcus Mender) (06-12-17 12:00:42):

    > However, if you already have an SSH server with key-based authentication
    > running, and you have got a client that supports SFTP (which is FTP over
    > an SSH tunnel), then you're already set. You can continue to use your
    > normal SSH keys for FTP authentication, which is of course preferable in
    > this case.


    A little correction. SFTP in not FTP over SSH. SFTP uses an SSH subsystem to
    start the sftp server (as Richard tell in another message) where you can
    issue commands and retry/send file and navigate on directory (with privilege
    you have from the user used to log in), using SSH protocol.

    You can have FTP over SSH, where FTP protocol is tunnelled via SSH. So,
    first you must to authenticate yourself from SSH point of view
    (username/password or username/key), and after you must to authenticate to
    FTP server. The two authentication may have different username and password.

    On same implementation, you can tunnelled a telnet protocol under SSH. For
    example you can login on your machine at office using SSH protocol (and so
    ciphering packets and medium authentication). From that you can ftp/telnet
    on you machines. The "local" (office) packet are in "clear" text, when pass
    throught SSH machine and sent to you are ciphered.

    This implementation is useful when authentication and security are not in
    application (for example trasnferring file by FTP from two machine trought
    Internet) and is not possibile to change or modify it.

    Hope this Help.

    I wish to all a Merry Christmas 2006!
    Cesare




  3. Re: What is the difference between ftp encryption types SSL, TLS, SFTP and SSH ?

    Should you decide to go TLS/SSL then you also need to consider whether
    you want to support implicit or explicit connections. Explicit
    connections are typically run on port 21 and allow you to support both
    standard unencrypted FTP sessions as well as encrypted sessions. To
    start an encrypted session the client will send the AUTH TLS or AUTH
    SSL command prior to login in order to encrypt the command channel.
    Implicit SSL on the other hand typically runs on port 990 and requires
    an encrypted SSL connection. Most all servers support explicit SSL,
    some support both explicit and implicit SSL.

    Van Glass
    JSCAPE
    Managed File Transfer and Security Solutions
    http://www.jscape.com/secureftpserver/



    Marcus Mender wrote:
    > I have seen a couple of different encryption types for ftp connections:
    >
    > TLS
    > SSL
    > SFTP
    > SSH
    >
    > Ok, provided an ftp server offers all these types: which type should I choose
    > to setup the ftp server or to select from the ftp clients view ?
    >
    > Is the security for all these types similar and the difference refers only different protocols?
    >
    > What are the pros and cons ?
    >
    > Marcus



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